Different count frames in hive
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Littlerock, California, USA
    Posts
    1,072

    Default Different count frames in hive

    My plan is to move to 11-frame deep brood boxes and 9-frame medium supers. My equipment is mixed with different ages of frames and I am now retiring the 2008 frames and replacing with 2011 frames.
    I have a recently vacated hive so I replaced five 2008 1-3/8" frames with five 1-1/4" frames alternating with the 2009 and 2010 standard 1-3/8" frames in the bottom brood box. The upper brood box still has ten 1-3/8" frames. When I put on supers I plan on using a 9-frame spacer to align the frames. Will the different configurations restrict movement through the hive?
    BTW I will scrape, crush and strain the 2008 frames down to the foundation to make them ready for re-use. Sound like a good plan as long as the frames are in good shape?
    “Everything will be all right in the end... if it's not all right then it's not yet the end”

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,668

    Default Re: Different count frames in hive

    I am trying to go to all 1 1/4 frames, but there are still a few 1 3/8 frames hiding in my brood boxes. I run 8 or 9 frames in my honey supers. I have not seen any apparent problems or restrictions with different size frames and spacings.

    In doing cutouts of feral hives, I find curvy brood combs with spots of 1 3/8 spacing for drone comb, with 1 1/4 spacing on parts of the comb with worker brood. I see comb spacings of various widths for honey storage combs. The funky shaped, variable shaped and spaced natural combs seem to work just fine for the wild bees. If it caused problems, I imagine the bees would try to correct them and eliminate the restrictions.

  4. #3

    Default Re: Different count frames in hive

    Countryboy what does it do for you. Cutting frames down to 1 1/4
    David
    My-smokepole
    http://www.davidspaintingandwallpapering.com"

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Littlerock, California, USA
    Posts
    1,072

    Default Re: Different count frames in hive

    Below is a link to a thread that I had posted, it turned out to be very informative:
    https://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ight=11-frames

    Here is a link to the search page:
    https://www.beesource.com/forums/sear...archid=3687053

    I am keeping russian/carniolians and since they are reported to be slow to build up in the spring and overwinter in smaller clusters. I wanted to see if the narrow frame brood nest gives them and advantage. I decided to give it a go in my climate to see how it works.
    “Everything will be all right in the end... if it's not all right then it's not yet the end”

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,668

    Default Re: Different count frames in hive

    Countryboy what does it do for you. Cutting frames down to 1 1/4

    With 1 3/8 frames in the broodnest, the bees put honey at the top of the frame, and draw the comb out wider. Often, they end up putting some drone comb at the bottom of the frames, which makes the bottom wider. When removing frames, there is a lot less chance of rolling the bees and queen with narrow frames.

    I find that the bees make a lot less burr comb between top bars with 1 1/4 frames. This makes it easier for me to do inspections.

    I can fit 11 frames in a 10 frame box. This extra frame allows me to have 10% more comb in any given cluster size. In cold weather, the amount of brood the cluster can cover is often a limiting factor in spring buildup. With narrow frames, I give the bees the ability to cover 10% more brood with the same cluster size.

    With 1 1/4 frames, I only need one layer of bees between frames to keep brood warm. With standard 1 3/8 frames, you need 2-3 layers of bees to keep brood warm, simply because of the larger air gap between frames. By running narrow frames, I free up bees to do other tasks in the hive.

    In feral hives that I have found, the worker brood combs are typically spaced at 1 1/4. When given a choice, the bees space brood combs like this. To me, that implies this spacing is the most efficient for the bees.

    For the way I run my bees, this seems to be working well for me.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •