Queen Mating studies
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Green Lane, PA
    Posts
    831

    Default Queen Mating studies

    In an attempt to improve my mating yards I've been searching for any studies on the distance queens fly, location of drone yards, and anything else relating to those two subjects.

    I am of particular interest of any studies using rfid to track queens returning from mating flight. Some of the books I've read seem to indicate the queen only leaves for mating between 12 and 3pm.

    Distances of drone colonies from mating yards also seems to be extremely debatable as some say 0.5 miles to 1.5 miles while others keep them further and some keep them as close as a few hundred yards. One study in particular used cordovan queens and drones. They placed the drone colonies at varying distances and found that most of the queens mated best with drone colonies something like 10 miles away. Don't quote me on that, I'm going off memory.

    Any info would be appreciated.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrior, Alabama
    Posts
    1,105

    Default Re: Queen Mating studies

    Do a search for drones, mating, queen flights, drone congregation areas on this forum. That will turn up alot.

    check:
    http://www.montybees.org.uk/content/...regation-areas

    have fun.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Green Lane, PA
    Posts
    831

    Default Re: Queen Mating studies

    I have searched and read alot of things on drone colonies and mating yards, but there is alot of conflicting information.

    Also I did a brief search on Radio Frequency Identification for honey bees/queen bees, and found very little. I did read that researchers have attached RFID tags to ants for tracking purposes. I think RFID would be fairly easy to implement on queens since, we already attach numbered disks onto them. One could easily track the times queens leave for mating and the actual time they spend mating. Does anyone know of any queen mating studies using RFID?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    2,727

    Default Re: Queen Mating studies

    A study done in the 80's, in Canada I think, showed that nucs placed close to the drone source had queens that started laying earlier than those that were farther away.

    I can't remember the distances involved but other articles/books I've read say drone colonies from 1/4 to 1/2 mile away is best. I do remember that the study above said nucs 13 km from the drone source had no queens mate and most failed to return from the mating flight.

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