Suburban Hive Location - Page 2
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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lee\'s Summit, MO
    Posts
    2,514

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    Breeding venomous snakes...? I need you as a neighbor. They think I'm crazy for having bees and using my 2nd story deck for bow practice. It's the same height as my deer stands and makes for great quick practice sessions after dinner. With you as a neighbor there'd be less whispering about me.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

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  3. #22
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Covington, Ga, USA
    Posts
    1,548

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    Ok, here is my particular situation:

    Live in a neighborhood on 1 acre Lot, had 13 hives in the back yard at one time. 18 kids play in and around and through my yard, and yes, even really really close to the bees. I have 4 neighbors who are GENUINELY ALLERGIC to bees, and have the docs to prove it as well as the Epi-Pens. The one who is the most allergic is also the same one who came and got me when he found my 1st swarm, and he didn't overreact. EVERYONE in the neighborhood is completely OK with it and only 1 child has been stung other than me, and he is my middle child and was helping me harvest frames from a hive and one got him on the ankle. I teach and alert the parents and children so that they do indeed know the danger, and I watch for aggressive actions from the hive. This is my 3rd year and EVERYONE around me just waits until its harvest time........they love it and I keep spares just for them. Nothing better than fresh honey they say, and even a few actually help me sell it. I also take them back to the hives so they can see, teach them about flight paths and such. Some are well-to-do, and some are not. Teaching was the key, understanding was the key, and knowledge of them was the key. Love my bees, my neighbors love my bees, and my bulldog, well, not so much because if and when he gets stung, hes too fat to bite his butt and literally twitches in a 90 deg angle until i remove the stinger for him

    Knowledge is the key, teaching is the key. You may even consider having an extra suit around to teach. It makes one heck of a difference. They will go into their yards to forage and to die and to find water.....they are wild creatures, but if maintained and not "pestered by the neighborhood hey yawll watch this" kid, they will be just fine!
    "You laugh at me because I am different, but I laugh at you because you are all the same."

  4. #23
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Billerica, MA
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    I had a lot of curious neighbors when the stockade fence went up last April. They got even more curious after the stand went in with two empty hives on it. One neighbor still walks by the fence slowly, looking between the panels to see exactly what I've got going on back there. It's hard to hide the white jacket, veil and smokepot though. I told one neighbor in passing, as he came out and asked me what I was up to. He thought it was a cool hobby albeit a little nutty, but was glad I told him as his oldest son, in his 20's, is allergic. After the spring/summer flow this year I plan to bring a pound or two to each immediate neighbor, and let them know that truly local bees provided this for them, and have been in the area for over a year. I do have a backup location that can hold all my hives plus some, but it's not the same having them away from where I can pull up a chair, in my yard, and enjoy the coming and going. So, not everybody knows, but I'm not actively hiding anything either.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    8,315

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    Quote Originally Posted by blazin View Post
    What do you all think of this location? Am I asking for trouble with the no sun factor?
    I can't quite visualize the location, but it seems like it's in a 5' wide space bordered on one side by a garage and another by thick foliage. If there's adequate space for the bees to get in and out of the hive without flying over your neighbors property it should do ok.

    I had bees on the side of my house in an 8' wide strip. It had little direct sun and the bees could fly out and straight up, or out and horizontally for about 20' before gaining altitude. We do not have moisture issues or SHB problems however.

    I was always amazed at how fast they flew over the house and then dropped straight down onto the landing board when they were working something from a direction behind the hive. It seemed that they're able to manuever incredibly well once they on something and are well oriented.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ridgewood, NJ, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    Barry- That is pretty much correct how you have described the area. The strip is long and narrow, probably about 5'x40' with thick high bushes on one long side and a garage on the other long side. The far short side points to my neighbors behind me who have the pool. I am going to put up some sort of visual and flight path barricade on that side. The near short side faces my property and the hives will face my property, but not facing directly into my backyard or towards my patio. In order to go to my back neighbors the bees would have to do a complete 180 turn in that narrow strip as soon as they leave the hive and then fly up over the barricade. In order to get to my next door neighbors they would have to make a 90 degree turn and fly straight up about 12'. The easiest way for them to go is straight out of the hive, down the strip and across my property.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    8,315

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    I think you'll be ok, but there are a couple of considerations you'll have to deal with.

    First, if there's anything in a neighbor's yard that satisfies a bee's needs the bees will get to it regardless of fences and property lines. If they like the pool they're going to be in it. If any of your neighbors have plants they like they'll be on those too, but probably not as much as folks may think. And people don't seem nearly as bothered by a bee gathering pollen and nectar off of their plants as they are when it's floating in their pool with a thousand of it's sisters. People are funny that way.

    The second is that if you get the bees up and over an obstacle they're probably going to maintain that height until they're on their forage, and then they're likely to travel back at a height that keeps them out of most peoples consciousness until they're nearly on their hive. A 6' or 8' fence will tend to elevate them enough to completely avoid using the neighboring yards as a flight path.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Lee\'s Summit, MO
    Posts
    2,514

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    Ditto that about forcing them up as they come and go. Some employees walk under the flight path of my OB hive every morning and evening. They know they're here and I put the entrance/exit under the roof line and it's over 10 foot above their heads. I've got a tree planted in front of the entrance/exit to lessen the visibility even further and force the bees even higher in a few years. It's a 5 frame hive so the numbers aren't huge and unless you're watching the entrance/exit (20 foot from the sidewalk) you never know they're there except they do occasionally beard in the dead of summer.
    Ninja, is not in the dictionary. Well played Ninja's, well played...

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Huntersville, NC
    Posts
    138

    Default Re: Suburban Hive Location

    I am in a suburban neighborhood and I do not tell my neighbors about the bees. Because of our kids (and their friends) some of the neighbors know about them and have said nothing. We might have had a couple of very casual conversation over the last couple of years. I simply act as if it is as typical as having a dog and take comfort in including the fact that the hives have been there for about 4 years, so why would a complaint start now?

    Unless you are willing to have a neighbor's objection keep you from having bees in your yard I don't understand telling them ahead of time. If you are willing to not keep the bees in your yard because of a neighbor's objection then I guess I can see the discussion happening but I am not as generous with the rules of my private property as others are.

    To tell or not to tell is probably as much a personality thing as anything. I am a "do not tell" kind of a guy but very willing to have a very positive conversation, educate, share information and honey etc. with any one that wants to have the conversation.

    In the original poster's set of questions, the swimming pool would be my biggest concern. Putting the pond in first is probably the best thing that you can do. Adding an attractant to the water is really smart. Lemon grass oil is what I have used (I use a bird bath with rocks in it for my water source). I have wondered if a teaspoon of honey mixed into the water would be good as an attractant, not sure. If the pool owner shows you hundreds of bees in his pool I think that even I would look for another beeyard given that the pool was there first and I do want to be a good neighbor.
    Last edited by Will O'Brien; 01-15-2011 at 01:38 PM.
    Thanks,
    Will

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