Africanized Bees - Are they really that bad? - Page 11
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  1. #201
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,253

    Default Re: Africanized Bees - Are they really that bad?

    Paul, in your research, have you come across any indications that the Beeweaver strain will do well, or can be adapted to, northern climates?

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  3. #202
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,354

    Default Re: Africanized Bees - Are they really that bad?

    There are people on this board that keep them as far north as New York. I keep them at 7500' in the Rockies - gets pretty cold and snowy up here. **** cold in fact.

    I have also found one of the biggest myths of African genetics is that they can't survive cold. That' total hogwash in my experience. They survive here plenty well, and it gets darn cold - sometimes down to -30. I think the biggest factor in bees like this not migrating North is that it really is not the climate they are best adapted to - sort of like why they didn't migrate East of Texas.

    Go down to South America where they are full blown Scutellata and I am sure those bees won't survive the Winter. They have probably never even seen a Winter.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

  4. #203
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    manhattan beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Africanized Bees - Are they really that bad?

    Designer breeds of dogs, roses, or any other human valued hybrid organism is a anachronism in Nature. Invariably, the selected genetics ends up eliminating advantageous and vigorous traits in service to the narrow range of human perceived values. This is the idea that bothers me most about the breeding programs, the dollars they attract and the powerful industries that cater to that system. This is your "what is going to save the beekeeping world" ---or any other world, for that matter. I am sick to death of hearing about the vaunted technological fixes that are going to deliver us from our hubris. The word biomimicry is being used in some scientific circles to direct attention to the way the natural world actually works, not the way we wish it would work.
    As to the bees we use here, they are easy to keep, don't need fussing and feeding, and act like bees---not zom-bees. I am not convinced of the utility of feeding commercial honey hives great quantities of syrup and fake pollen in order for them to turn it into honey, but that is the model urged by folks doing honey production on the Calfifornia coast. Not all of them, but a lot of them. Conventional club keepers are urged this is the "right method" also.

  5. #204
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,768

    Default Re: Africanized Bees - Are they really that bad?

    >have you come across any indications that the Beeweaver strain will do well, or can be adapted to, northern climates?

    I had Weaver Buckfasts in Western Nebraska (the panhandle) from the mid 70's to the mid 80's (two winters it was -40 F and one of those it was -40 F every night for a month). I also had them in the late 80's in Laramie at 7,200 ft and a winter that was also -40 F for a week or more and in Eastern Nebraska in the late 90's up to 2001. Wintering was not an issue other than Varroa issues...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

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