Osteoarthritis - Hand Surgery
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    12,001

    Default Osteoarthritis - Hand Surgery

    Found out today that the pain I've been having in my hand at the base of my thumb is due to arthritis. X-ray showed little to no cartilage between the bones. Also have bone spurs. Doctor said I will need surgery in time, when I can't deal with the pain anymore. It appears the hand is put in a cast for 6 weeks after surgery and it can take up to several months to regain full use of the hand.

    Has anyone had this surgery? I'd sure like to hear from someone that's been through this.


    There are two types of procedures. This is the most common:

    http://www.eatonhand.com/hw/hw003.htm

    One that hasn't been around that long is this, where the trapezium bone is left in place and a prostheses is used:

    Joint replacement (arthroplasty). In this procedure, surgeons remove part or all of the joint and replace it with a graft from one of your tendons. New plastic or metal devices called prostheses also are being developed to replace the joint. Currently, however, doctors prefer soft-tissue (tendon) arthroplasty.
    Regards, Barry

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Asheville, NC
    Posts
    264

    Default

    what caused it? repetitive motion?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    12,001

    Default

    Yeah, a lot of hard use. Almost 30 years of construction. Could be genetics as well as my Grandmother has arthritis.
    Regards, Barry

  5. #4

    Default

    Sorry for the problems B. Don't you pay the bills swinging a hammer?

    This is gonna sound odd, but have you tried beestings for the pain? RIght at the sight? How much do you get stung keeping bees?

    I do not know anyone that had that surgery and have not cared for patients that had. The informal things heard about arthritic surgery is that they need repetition at some point in the future (hips and knees). My builder saw the local hand expert for a genetic lineage defect that alters use of hands and was very unsatisfied...

    On the overall subject of healthcare I'd suggest a book by Norton Hadler "Worried Sick". It is not specific to arthritis but it offers a paradigm shift for those willing.

    Good luck. STOP TYPING SO MUCH lol

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    parker county, tx
    Posts
    7,923

    Default

    How about glucosamine and chondroitin? I've heard doctors recommend it. I've never used it because my aches and pains aren't that severe yet, but if I ever start having pain from ostoarthritis, that's the first thing I will try. Just an idea.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Yuba County, California, USA
    Posts
    6,528

    Default

    At the very least, Try the beestings, they do wonders for me! Start out with one sting in the infected joint and see how it does. If not satisfactory, try 2 the next time. You'll have to work out the amount of stings and the frequency, but over time, you'll start reducing the stings to littler or none.

    I use the stings for arthritis and for nerve pains due to multiple spine discs degenerating with herniated dics.

    Best of luck!
    Live real time bee chat, most evenings...
    https://www.rumbletalk.com/client/chat.php?4%40HY_hmJ

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonfly View Post
    How about glucosamine and chondroitin? I've heard doctors recommend it. I've never used it because my aches and pains aren't that severe yet, but if I ever start having pain from ostoarthritis, that's the first thing I will try. Just an idea.
    Forget surgery! It is LAST resort!

    Glucosamine and chondroitin is the way to go. Make sure capsule also contains manganese. Use it 90 days at least. I use it in dogs (yes human product in dogs) all the time with excellent success. Beware of fake formulas (bought OTC) which do not have enough of glucosamine. I use Pure Encapsulation's product "Glucosamine Chondroitin with manganese". I know it is good because they send me quarterly independent lab analysis. I carry this product routinely in the hospital. You have to find someone who carries it. As far as I know they sell it only to doctors.

    If you can not find this product start using Knox Gelatine. One to two packets a day in juice. Make sure you start supplementin Calcium in colloidal form. Tums and other metallic Calcium formulations (lactate, carbonate...) are useless.

    P.S. Glucosamine is not cheap i.e. the cheaper the product doesn't mean the same product. It means it doesn't have enough glucosamine regardless what the label says. Instead it has a filler, usually milk powder.

    Try this for 90 days! If you have wear and tear osteoarthritis you will not need surgery.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RayMarler View Post
    At the very least, Try the beestings
    Beestings are OK but you have to rebuild your cartilage. And that is what your glucosamine/chondroitin does. It is raw product which will you body use to rebuild new cartilage all over your body. Good luck.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    12,001

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by nursebee View Post
    Don't you pay the bills swinging a hammer?
    Yes, sorta. Nowadays, it's shooting nails with air. However, it's my left hand/thumb that's giving me problems, not the right. I would have figured it the other way around.

    This is gonna sound odd, but have you tried beestings for the pain? RIght at the sight? How much do you get stung keeping bees?
    No, not odd. I plan to start giving stings a try. I've been away from bees for the most part over the last five years and just now getting back into it, so I haven't had many stings for awhile. Use to get plenty.

    My builder saw the local hand expert for a genetic lineage defect that alters use of hands and was very unsatisfied...
    I'm not rushing into this for sure. Right now it's just a constant low grade pain and stiffness that flares up every so often. I use to take glucosamine for years, and then stopped. I just started taking it again, but I'm not sure much can be done for the thumb joint once the bone is rubbing bone. Now it's pain management, no?
    Regards, Barry

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    12,001

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pcelar View Post
    you have to rebuild your cartilage. And that is what your glucosamine/chondroitin does.
    OK, I'm taking it and will increase the dosage. I was taking a minimal dose that I use to take (which helped a lot then) but will up it to full dose (1500 mg) for now.
    Regards, Barry

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,105

    Default

    Sorry to hear that Barry........... I agree with others on
    the glucosamine and chondroitin therapy. It's worth a shot.

    My mom suffered with hand pain from arthritis for years.
    At the time I worked in a hospital pharmacy and got her
    a cream that uses capsaicin (hot pepper). She marveled
    at the pain relief she got from that.

    http://altmedicine.about.com/od/comp...icin_cream.htm
    Closing in on retirement.......

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    OK, I'm taking it and will increase the dosage. I was taking a minimal dose that I use to take (which helped a lot then) but will up it to full dose (1500 mg) for now.
    Try to find Pure Encapsulation's product or Knox Gelatine. Do not buy Glucosamine OTC. ABC News did hidden camera investigation and they found that many preparations didn't have even 10% of claimed quantity.

    CHECK IT OUT!

    20/20’s Arnold Diaz reports that some products may have much less of key ingredients than listed on the label. (ABCNEWS.com)

    Nutritional supplements, in particular, have crossed over from the shelves at the health food stores into supermarkets, drugstores, and discount stores. Even entire chains, like GNC and Vitamin Shoppe, are built around them.
    But as 20/20’s Arnold Diaz reports, some believe the herbal explosion is a double-edged sword. While on one side, many of the products are effective and can improve a person’s life, new laboratory tests obtained by 20/20 reveal that some products may have much less of the key ingredients than they list on the label. And as manufacturers rush into lucrative new markets, critics argue there are not enough safety nets.
    If you pick up a bottle of prescription or over-the-counter medication, you can be pretty sure it’s been through lots of testing and government scrutiny before it gets in your hands. But with nutritional supplements, there are no guarantees. That’s because herbals, vitamins and minerals are regulated like food and their manufacturers do not have to prove their products are safe or effective. And the government has taken a hands-off approach when it comes to making sure that what is listed on the label is what’s really in the bottle.
    Lab Tests Yield Surprising Results
    Dr. Tod Cooperman, who runs a company that analyzes supplements called Consumerlab.com, believes consumers are in the dark about what’s in the supplements. “There’s no way for a consumer to know what’s in a pill,” he tells 20/20. “The only way to know what is inside … is to test them.”
    20/20 paid Consumerlab.com for a detailed analysis of tests it had done on 100 bottles of some popular herbal supplements. The results revealed one in four of the bottles did not have what the manufacturer claimed on the label.
    Consumerlab.com tested chondroitin products — supplements used by thousands of arthritis sufferers — and found that eight of the 15 brands did not have the amount of chondroitin listed on the label. In fact, four bottles had less than 10 percent of the chondroitin they claimed to have. The products ranged from $6 to $55 per bottle.
    Chondroitin manufacturers that responded to 20/20 say their tests show no problem with their products. They say scientists disagree over the best way to test chondroitin and that results from different labs can vary substantially.
    Tests of a new supplement called sam-e — which claims to improve mood and relieve joint pain — revealed that six out of the 13 products tested had less than half the sam-e they listed on the label. One product had almost no sam-e at all.
    In response, two manufacturers blamed the problem on a labeling mistake. One wrote, “We simply goofed when the label was made for this batch.”
    Finally, Consumerlab.com tested products containing gingseng, a popular pick-me-up. Their results showed that five out of 21 products have less ginseng than what their labels claimed. And the lab also found eight bottles contained quintozene, a pesticide sometimes sprayed on ginseng when it’s growing.
    The manufacturers say the tested samples must have been older products because now they only use “certified quintozene-free” materials.
    Consumerlab.com sells its seal of approval to products that pass its tests. Some companies argue this is a conflict of interest, and they also object to the fact that the company uses only one bottle of each brand it tests. But the company stands by the accuracy of its results.
    Whether it’s ginseng, sam-e or chondroitin, Consumerlab.com says its test results are a snapshot of an industry with obvious problems. “Until someone is actually out there checking, there’s not a huge incentive to fix the problem,” says Cooperman.
    But the manufacturers says there’s no problem. David Seckman, head of the National Nutritional Foods Association, says the trade group and the manufacturers run programs that encourage quality control. “We think that the industry should follow good manufacturing practices,” he says.
    Last edited by pcelar; 03-11-2009 at 02:26 PM.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    I have had many patients with knee or hip replacements and most of them were very happy with the results. The few that have had joint replacement in the hands were satisfied, as well. If it were me, I would put off the surgery as long as I had satisfactory function and comfort using other methods. As far as bee sting therapy goes, osteoarthritis may not respond as well as rheumatoid arthritis as it is not an autoimmune disease like rheumatoid is.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    hamburg, new york, usa
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Todd View Post
    I have had many patients with knee or hip replacements and most of them were very happy with the results.
    I have also seen many of my clients with infections and other problems. Also those have to be fiddled with and replaced every 5-10 years. My next door neighbor died from complications due to hip replacement surgery. So, when doctors talk about percentages they should have in mind that surgical or post surgical complication for that person it is 100%. Barry in my book elective surgery is very, very, very... LAST option for both animals and people. Have a nice day.
    Last edited by pcelar; 03-12-2009 at 05:56 AM.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Buda, Texas
    Posts
    922

    Default

    As stated, I would avoid surgery if I could get relief using other options and would advise taking pcelar's advice regarding supplements. Once you have surgery, you can't undo it and you may have problems that you did not have before. I have seen every complication there is from the most minor to the most serious. But surgery DOES help LOTS of people live better lives, and without a complication rate of 100%. It may be the last option, but it is certainly worth considering. I make my statements based on both statistics from places like WebMD (states 85% of knee surgeries last 20 years or more) but also on 10 years of experience in the hospital working at the bedside of thousands of patients.
    "I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep. " John 10:11

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    I'm not sure glucosamine/chondroitin works. My wife used it for her knee and it didn't help her. She eventually had a knee replacement and is doing fine.

    Are there any large controlled studies that show that glucosamine/chondroitin is effective? What are it's side effects?

    Surgery is not necessarily the last resort. Find a surgeon that does nothing but the surgery that you need and find out (independently if possible) what his/her success rate is. Often at large medical school hospitals doctors publish the results of their work. The peer review that the article goes through makes the published results more reliable. You can usually find this research on the Internet.

    I had a major procedure done a few years ago at The Cleveland Clinic. Before I visited the physician I new what his success rate was by reading his research articles on the Internet. But, I still asked him what his success rate was on the first visit. What he told me was the same as in the published research.

    When you visit a physician do your home work using the Internet beforehand. Learn as much as you can about your condition. For many common conditions there are web forums specific to a single condition. Reading these with a critical eye can help find treatments, physicians, etc.

    Write down a list of all the questions you want to ask the physician. Take someone with you on physician visits. Four ears are better than two.

    Good luck.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Charles Koch

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •