Curious Question: What state is best?
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  1. #1

    Default Curious Question: What state is best?

    As it says: what state has the best honey flows? I'm not talking about the best honey, but the longest/best/most productive honey flow without being migratory? I know this depends a lot on the specific location, but in general, I know a lot of southern states have a great early flow but that falls off fast. I'm in Indiana and our nectar flow is really picking up and as far as I know soybeans bloom most all summer and into august in which a lot of fall weeds and plants continue producing a small flow. Which states would you consider the best as far as providing a consistent nectar/honey flow for a long time?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
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    Maine ranks 50th I believe. Not sure if we're behind or ahead of Alaska.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #3
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    Without being migratory? How far would you consider moving bees to be "migratory/". NC has a good flow in the east. Gallberry, Tupelo, clover, dandelion, kudzu, blackberry, holly, privet, goldenrod, tulip poplar,sourwood, cotton and many others can be found in the same locale in eastern NC. The climate is generally mild, and as long as there is no drought like we had last year(or a late freeze) we have a pretty long honey harvest season.
    Banjos and bees... how sweet it is!

  5. #4
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    I haven't looked lately, but it seems like North Dakota used to top the charts all the time on honey production.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  6. #5
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Accoding to this: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_...ar/hny0303.htm looks like HI has the highest per colony yield.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by AstroBee View Post
    Accoding to this: http://www.nass.usda.gov/Statistics_...ar/hny0303.htm looks like HI has the highest per colony yield.
    Thanks AstroBee, that basically sums it up

  8. #7
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    Kennebunk, Maine
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    George is right. Maine is so bad that I am sending my bees to New Hampshire. Not a drop in the two years that I have been here. I always got honey when I lived in Massachusetts.

  9. #8
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    White County, Arkansas
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    Stupid question here. Does the number of colonies in the state compared to the amount of honey per colony change the numbers of per hive amount? I don't know if I phrased that correctly.

    I mean if all the colonies were the same in each state would that not change the yield numbers? Or would it be ... I'm starting to confuse myself by over thinking this.

  10. #9
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    well I don't know about honey flow... and the honey flow in North Dakota (especially the western side) can fluctuate greatly (from 0 to 200 pounds in the bat of an eye). I do know that all the great bee keepers in some way form or fashion spring from Minnesota.. it's probably something they put in the water.

    hawaii... now that has got to be a misprint or are they also including all that most excellent high fructose corn syrup that they pour into those hives as part of their honey crop?

  11. #10
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    best state qualified...

    best state for keeping bees based on maximum $ generated...... california.

    best state for rearing spring time bees.... central texas or cental florida.

    best state for collecting a significant honey crop.... anywhere along the missouri river in either south or north dakota.

  12. #11
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    Fredericksburg, Va
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    best state for lowest commute time/cost - the state in which you live
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  13. #12
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    Tulsa, OK
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    What kinds of plants are the bees working along the Missouri river?

  14. #13
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    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
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    Default Yeild Per Colony!

    According to the statictical data referenced previously in this post, it appears the best states by "yeild per colony" are:

    HI 136 pounds per colony
    LA 124 pounds per colony
    NY 98 pounds per colony
    WI 95 pounds per colony
    SC 94 pounds per colony
    FL 93 pounds per colony
    VT 89 pounds per colony

    My state TN = 61 pounds per colony
    Oh well, we do the best we can...
    “My child, eat honey, for it is good, and the drippings of the honeycomb are sweet to your taste.” (Proverbs 24:13)

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    So,
    Do people in residential/hobbiest settings usually yield more than commercial? My mentor, the guy across the street, has been getting 120 lbs or more off of each of his 3 hives here in Oregon for a years. I guess state may not be a the most meaningful scale look at?

  16. #15
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Bee View Post
    According to the statictical data referenced previously in this post, it appears the best states by "yeild per colony" are:

    VT 89 pounds per colony
    I don't know about other states. The averages are just thsat. Averages. My 10 year average in Vermont is better than 100.

  17. #16
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    Amador County, Calif
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    It's got to bee Calif,

    60 pound avg... you were talking surcrose weren't you,
    HONEY... what's that? lol

  18. #17
    Join Date
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    ndvan ask:
    What kinds of plants are the bees working along the Missouri river?


    tecusmeh replies:
    yellow sweet clover, white sweet clover (can't u just smell it in the air), and of course alfalfa. the east side of the missouri is (or at least was) fairly agriuclturally diverse.. the west side more rolling plain and expansive grazing type operations.

    of course it's the view of the great plains that really gets the girls inspired.

  19. #18
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    Arundel, Maine USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Luke View Post
    George is right. Maine is so bad that I am sending my bees to New Hampshire. Not a drop in the two years that I have been here. I always got honey when I lived in Massachusetts.
    ok, you and I are only about 5 miles apart and I've had the same problem. I thought I was just a bunk beekeeper. Perhaps there is hope for me. I do know a few beeks around here who have produced quite a harvest though
    Let's BEE friends

  20. #19
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    Jul 2007
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    Suffolk NY
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    Fred- are those total yields or honey surplus?

  21. #20
    Join Date
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    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
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    Yield per Colony as per the link earlier in this post.
    “My child, eat honey, for it is good, and the drippings of the honeycomb are sweet to your taste.” (Proverbs 24:13)

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