Keeping Honey warm while bottling
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    Default Keeping Honey warm while bottling

    I am having trouble keeping the honey lightly warm while I bottle. For years, I have used a heating pad but I have not been happy with it lately. when it is time to pour, the honey is cold and takes forever to bottle.

    I keep the bottling buckets in the house and I can not keep the temp of the room hot. It is usually around 65 or so.

    I have thought about using the bucket heater that fits around the bucket. Anyone ever tried this method?

    Any suggestions or thoughts?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    Silicon Valley, CA
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    Default

    Suggest that you build an insulated cabinet (or convert a fridge) to store the buckets in. Put a lighted 100 watt bulb at the bottom of the enclosure to heat the space. The buckets should probably be at least 6-8 inches above the bulb.

    I use something similar to warm the frames before extraction. Gets them up to 90-100 in a couple of days.

    Fuzzy

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    8,238

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    Any suggestions or thoughts?
    Yeah, invest in a water jacketed bottling tank.

  5. #4
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    Jul 2004
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    how about the bans that fit around a plastic bucket.... do they work well?
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
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    Seattle, Washington State
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    The problem with a converted freezer or water jacketed tank is the space. I just do not have the space.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Suffolk, VA
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    Yes, the strap heaters work well, but they probably will get the honey hotter than you want. I guess you could closely monitor the temps to prevent it from getting your honey too hot, but that's another thing to worry about. I have one and it has been my experience that these heating straps are very good at liquifying buckets that have crystalized, which is much hotter than what is needed to simply pour honey quickly. I'm going from distant memory, but I believe that the straps will get the honey in the 125 F range, perhaps hottter right next to the band.

  8. #7

    Default bands

    they can darken the honey if not watched closely.
    bob

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fuquay Varina, NC
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    261

    Default

    I use the bucket heaters and stir the honey frequently until the temp reaches in the mid 90's. Drastically helped the flow on those clam shell type gates right above the o-ring where previously always seemed to ooze out honey.
    Hughes Honey Apiary
    http://www.hugheshoney.com

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tompkins County, New York
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    118

    Default

    I just put in a similar question in the honey section; my strap-type heater melted the plastic on a bucket! So I'm gingerly using a rheostat to regulate it, and it's taking 48 hours to liquefy a bucket. I'm wondering if mine is just defective. My husband is thinking "heat tape." I'm thinking that since we bottle in the laundry room, we close the door and crank up a space heater.
    My beekeeping blog: The Bee Yard

  11. #10

    Default

    A Letrokennel pad might work. It's ABS plastic, so it's waterproof and cleans easily. They claim 100 degrees, but mine is hotter than that when run without the rheostat. The rheostat would likely work well with the other heating units if they run too hot.

    http://www.khmfg.com/products/dogs/lectroKennel.htm

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  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Saskatchewan, Canada
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    335

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    I have used bucket heaters in the past but did not like them. The best method for warming honey is a deep freeze or fridge with light bulbs controled by a Ranco thermostat. If you do not have room for that I would use a heating mat used by gardeners to geminate seed. A pail placed on this with an insulated jacket would work fine.

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Thaxton, Mississippi
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    473

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    I built a cabinet from plywood. It is approximately ;; L 5ft, Ht 2 ft, W2ft with a raise up lid on top. I installed two light bulbs. I can place four 5 gal. buckets inside at a time. I have been amazed how well this works.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Colorado
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    1,523

    Default

    we close the door and crank up a space heater. [/QUOTE]

    Dats what I do. Get the room up to 95 F. Then overnight the full supers in there. Then work in it for one day With the step-son. The heat keeps the grandkids out from under foot. In mid-summer it's not hard to keep a room at 95.

    Hawk
    KC0YXI

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