How are your winter loss rates this spring
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,591

    Default How are your winter loss rates this spring

    How are all of your bees coming through winter? What percent (%) losses are you seeing?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,082

    Default

    I've seen 7.4% loss as of 03/01/08. Lost 4 out of 54 of my full size hives. My nucs however aren't fairing as well. Lost 7 of 11 as of yesterday. I've gotta do better with the nucs this next year.
    Last edited by Dan Williamson; 03-06-2008 at 01:22 PM. Reason: Update.... miscounted my original hives by 1 and found one queenless which I combined.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    los angeles, ca
    Posts
    109

    Default

    I'm In Los Angeles
    6 hives one late nuc doing poor
    kirk
    I like bugs

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Bismarck, ND USA
    Posts
    511

    Default

    Had 52 dead out of 480 by the time I left CA on January 20, about 11%. Not bad IMO, much better than last year.
    Gregg Stewart

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Fruitland ,Idaho
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Less than 10% and very happy with that. What is yours?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,591

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Noyes View Post
    Less than 10% and very happy with that. What is yours?
    Hi there Nick,

    I am running about 3% loss which I was happy with, but what I struggled with was brood production this Jan. I can only think it was the low temps of Jan that was holding back the bees.

    Action (beesource member) helped me go through the bees in Jan, sometimes 25 frames of bees and only 3 frames of brood. This was fraustrating at times.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Default

    Winter loses so far this winter are: lost (1) of (2) hives I thought would not make it to the New Year, the (30) I thought would see spring are looking good.

    Spring is still about 7 weeks away with the first pollen coming in. The Popular and Red Maples should start blooming around the end of the first week in April.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hillsboro,Ohio
    Posts
    193

    Default

    So far, I have not has any dead outs. But I am no where as large as an operation as most of you. I have 8 strong, 1 weak, and 1 nuc that is hanging in there. Winter is hanging on far too long in Southern Ohio. I keep reading posts, from the South, about things in bloom and it is killing me to look out at 3" of snow.
    Keith,
    I was reading a post of yours awhile ago about selling pollen patties. Have you got any for sale?
    Marcus
    life is like a box of chocolates,you never know what you are gonna get

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cleveland, Texas
    Posts
    1,377

    Default

    I have lost 1 of 15 hives. Tried to requeen this hive 3 times last fall, guess it never took as it is still queenless and has just a handfull of bees left (so technically its not dead yet, but I have no hope for it).
    "The UNKNOWN, huh? That would be SNORBERT ZANGOX over in Waycross."

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Bena, VA
    Posts
    275

    Default Lost 2 out of 13

    We warmed up to the mid 50's yesterday afternoon. On 2 FEB I had 13 out of 13 making it. Yesterday, 23 FEB, I had two dead, small clusters out of touch with stores. Hopefully the others make it through. Now I have additional concerns with the frames of honey and our newest pest, SHB.

    Pete0
    Bena, VA

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    So far I'm 9 for 9 The observation hive that I thought wouldn't is still hanging in there, even though it is only softball size cluster and 1/3 frame of honey left...

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sparta, Tennessee
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    I checked one yard yesterday since the temp warmed up to 32F, which was set up with sugar on top of newspaper and tar-paper wrapped hives. Five NUCs side by side (with Peggjams Carni queens) and then wrapped as one unit. All five are doing fine, one is working the sugar in a big way, so I added more sugar. Four full size hives all are fine. My weather is about the same as Mountaincamps so we have a while to go yet. I'm pleased so far.

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,373

    Default

    In my home yard I had thirteen full-size hives. In early January, just before I began stimulative feeding, I found one had gone queenless. I could have combined one of my five overwintered nucs to replace their queen, but instead I combined them with the weakest of my other twelve queenright colonies. So, technically, I lost one full-size hive. The nucs are another story -- one has just finished replacing their lost queen. It seems they may have been completely successful - I should know for sure in about another week. One other nuc is also queenless and has three ripe queen cells -- I hope they are also successful. So, despite some problems, my five regular nucs that I overwintered are okay for now.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Knoxville, Tennessee,USA
    Posts
    207

    Default

    I have only lost one. The state apirist came to inspect the hive as well as take samples of the few dead bees left. The laboratory results were inconclusive and the bees did not die of varroa, tracheal, nosema or foulbrood. The hive was strong going into the winter with a queen. The "dead out" was mysterious. My other hives are really starting to build up for the early spring honeyflow. They are bringing in pollen big time.

  16. #15
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    eastern Hanover, Virginia
    Posts
    361

    Default

    I lost 1 out of 5, looks like they were just a few inches away from stores.

  17. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
    Posts
    311

    Default

    I probably lost 4 out of 6 hives, two of those four I confirmed yesterday, two remaining ones are headed by Russian queens, so I'm not sure whether they made it or not. I am waiting for a warmer day to open them and find out. Tough lesson to learn, one confirmed dead hive died of varroa, second confirmed dead seemed to have lost queen late, they tried to raise emergency queen, but must have been too late to mate. Tons of dead drones in that hive, few workers, lot's of empty queen cells. That one I am real bumped about, it was my best hive, produced 150 pounds last year. I wanted to make some nucs from it this year. I overwintered four nucs, one made it so far, and seems to e thriving. I NEED one day of good weather soon or I'll go nuts... :-)

  18. #17

    Default

    Hi Keith
    Yeah, that cold makes it hard to entice those queens to get with the brood rearing. Now you know what some of us Northern beeks go through.

    So far 10% loss. True dead outs were rare indeed with less than 1% but after combining the small ones we have about 10% MTs. It hurts to kiss off a good queen but then if she was that good she wouldn't have been so small to begin with, I guess.
    I sure feel bad for those that had the devastating losses.
    Sheri

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    New Albany, Ohio
    Posts
    351

    Default Hope I'm not jinxing myself...

    Two weeks ago it was warm enough to check hives. Out of 14 hives, one was dead. It was weak and I had moved it to the quarantine yard to feed it, but it didn't make it. Small cluster of bees, almost no stores left. They had stopped taking syrup in January.

    Now, the weather here is too much like it was last year when most of my hives froze out or starved in the February four week cold snap. Big difference this year is that when I looked two weeks ago, all the hives had good weight and nice clusters covering 6 frames in most cases.

    Still feeding two, including a cut out that I did in late September.
    John
    www.G-honey.com since 2001

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,600

    Default

    Right around the same as Sheri-and the same situation.Few actually dead but they might as well be since they are too small to pollinate.So they get combined and the equipment gets stacked to remake later.Sometimes those combines pull ahead , sometimes they revert back to dinks.Kind of sad to find a dink later on with 3 queens and none of them any good

  21. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Lynchburg, VA
    Posts
    2,530

    Default

    Currently, I have 18 of 18. All of them were started lasted year with no drawn comb, all from foundation. Four were started from packages in April, one from a swarm from a bee tree in early July, and the rest (thirteen) were from nucs started in mid-July to mid-August.

    The frames for four nucs came from the packages and the rest (nine nucs) from the swarm I caught. I lost at least one swarm from one of the package hives. Most of the queens I bought from Purvis Brothers. But I used swarm cells in four hives and bought a couple Russian queens from Long Creek Apiaries . I have been lucky so far.
    From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Charles Koch

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