Candle Problem and Candle Questions
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,397

    Default Candle Problem and Candle Questions

    I poured some candles a few minutes ago and remembered, after I poured, that I forgot to spray the molds. Is this going to be a problem???

    What are you all using to package your candles??? I was thinking of a clean plastic bag of some sort.

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,397

    Default

    My molded candles are still cracking on top. Maybe the wax is too hot. Any suggestions?

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
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    4,397

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    Am I missing something? Dont you just melt the wax, pour it in to the mold and call it good? Some people recomend heating the molds. Some people say poking relief holes and then filling them again.

    Any help would be MUCH appreciated.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Annapolis Valley, N.S. Canada
    Posts
    307

    Default

    Hi Chef. I have just started to make candles myself. I do not know what kind of molds you are using, I am using Candle-Flex molds. Apparently you only have to spray them every other time or so. I usually try to pour my candles when the wax drops to around 165 degrees and I always save just a bit in the pour pot to top off all my pours ( right after I have done my last mold I go top them all off ) I have yet to have any cracks but I still have the odd one with a small hole around the bottom where the wick is but nothing serious enough to even address. I haven't tried the metal molds ( that's next ). I will be interested to hear what other people are going to say.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Freedom Indiana
    Posts
    30

    Default

    Not sure about the cracks.
    I use only metal mold for my candles.
    I've never used a release agent on them.
    I simply put them in the freezer for 5 or 10 minutes if they refuse to come out.
    Do not leave them in too long as it will affect the look of the wax.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    1,683

    Default

    the cracks are likely air bubbles. Sometimes they are a bugger to get out.
    If it cracks it's there. Just gotta find it. I find it harder to get the cracks out of the metal than the candle flex

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    south dakota
    Posts
    113

    Default

    i think candles look like crap when they are inside plastic. people like to pick them up, hold them and smell them. your candles are cracking because they are cooling too fast. cover them up with something to keep them warm longer and cool more slowly. if you are using flex molds you only have to spray every 5th or 6th time. if using metal molds you need it more often.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Julian, NC, USA
    Posts
    252

    Default

    Candle Flex molds and other silicone molds require no release agent. My wife has poured literally thousands without ever spraying a release agent.
    Candles pour best at 165 degrees. (the cooler the better until the point of creating lines as you pour) Cracks are unusual. Sink marks are normal and caused by the wax being too hot or the mold cooling too quickly. Silicone molds have a natural insulation built in and cool more evenly causing less sink.
    Packaging is a matter of taste. The only valid options are cello bags and shrink wrap. If you are selling in an outdoor market, you must protect your candles from dirt. Packaging is essential for the serious candle marketer. Leave one or two candles unwrapped for the customers experience. These can be cleaned or remelted later.
    Slow consistant pouring also helps give time for trapped air to get out. Patience is essential in candle making.

    Kurt

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Coquitlam, BC. Canada
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I have made several different types of candles over the last few years. First you should have a good thermometer and the temp. For pouring should be between 160 Ė 175 deg. F.
    Molds that are the best to use and you donít need any mold releasant are Silicone and Rubber. You do have to top the candles sometimes. The metal ones can be difficult to use. After you pour the wax you can let the top part set and remove the wick holder and top up so there are no lines. For metal molds you can add a mold releasant into the wax, (it looks like wax pellets.)

    A paper label and some raffia go a long way

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