Breakthrough in Varroa mite battle
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  1. #1
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    Default Breakthrough in Varroa mite battle

    Recently read this from New Zeland,

    http://tvnz.co.nz/view/page/413551/1506705

    What do you think?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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  3. #2
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    Mite resistant bees! Now who would have ever thought of that :confused:

    The world has been saved!!!!!!!!
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  4. #3
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    jep thats what i thought it was just that easy.... too bad we dont have anybody in this country that smart jez..... wait maybe we just dont have an island

  5. #4
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    Still....aside from the shallow press knowledge....ya gotta applaude the scientist's work. There's no doubt they are aware of their coworkers throughout the world. If we could get their Varroa resistance together with our Russians, SMT/VSH, Minn. Hygienic, etc., we would certainly continue to have V. destructor by the short and curly legs.

  6. #5
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  7. #6
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    Default

    Let me put it another way,

    Does anyone know of the reaserch being done breeding vorroa-resistant bees at Hamilton's Ruakura Research Center in Zew Zeland?
    I cant find any links to this reaserch.
    Last edited by Ian; 01-16-2008 at 12:59 PM.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #7
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    >>If the experiment is successful the island, and possibly others like it, could become vital breeding centres for large numbers of highly resistant queens. These could then form the basis of a continuous flow of new genetics to the mainland, helping to maintain high levels of resistance in commercial hives.

    Would provide an oportunity for thier queen and package industry. One benifet of breeding on an inland, is a controled gene pool.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  9. #8
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    >>wait maybe we just dont have an island


    Hawaii
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #9
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    Breakthrough will only come when the government tells use we have to stop treatments because varroa mites are on the endangered species list.
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  11. #10
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    Actually we do have some people that smart in this country. I bought my bees from a person who has developed a mite resistant strain of his own. He has combined the advantages of the following races: Italian, Carniolan, Russian, Buckfast, and Minnesota hygenic into his own racial conglomerate which he has not treated for the last 10 years. He averages about a 2% loss in the winter. These bees are honey makers too. The hive I bought from him, I split this spring with 3 frames and this 3 frame nuc of these bees made a total of 13 supers of honey this year, 4 from foundation, and nine drawn comb supers during the sourwood flow. One of the swarms that came off the mother hive made 9 supers of honey total. 3 from foundation and 6 during the sourwood flow. He has really hit on something and I will continue to expand with only this superior bee.

  12. #11
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    >>he has not treated for the last 10 years. He averages about a 2% loss ...These bees are honey makers too.

    Their performance is something to be admired.
    Is the breeders name someone we all would recognize?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  13. #12
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    CS

    Am I to understand that you bought a hive, split it, then it swarmed and you captured the swarm, and in all those bees made 13 + 9 = 23 supers of honey??

    Dave

  14. #13
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    meduims perhaps,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #14
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    Ian,

    You would not recognize his name. He is a local beekeeper here in east tennessee. He is a guru when it comes to managing his bees. You may recognize however, my other mentor Odra Turner, the man here who made 18 supers 3 springs ago, within a half a super of the Guinness Book World Record. I really got lucky with my mentors as this is only my second year in the business. I did not understand what "mediums" meant.

    drobbins,

    The one hive came through the winter with a massive amount of bees which decided to draw queen cells this February. Odra helped me split the bees. The split was an artificial swarm technique. However, the original hive off of which this split was made, swarmed twice. The first swarm, I hived, and it made 9 total supers this year while the afterswarm made about 6 this year.

  16. #15
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    wow, that's quite a story
    you're not that far from me and the weather is similar
    I know we had really warm weather last winter but a Feb split is quite a feat
    then we had a really bad freeze at Easter that wiped out most of the Tulip Poplar
    not to mention the drought which killed everything else
    you need to breed those bees, me and everyone else here want some

    Dave

  17. #16
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    Rut Roh, they seem to have forgotten to mention that small cell is required to have bees that are mite resistant. That must be planned for the addendum later??????
    "Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts." Winston Churchill

  18. #17
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    What are you talking about Bizzybee?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
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  19. #18
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    "I bought my bees from a person who has developed a mite resistant strain of his own. He has combined the advantages of the following races: Italian, Carniolan, Russian, Buckfast, and Minnesota hygenic into his own racial conglomerate which he has not treated for the last 10 years."

    Great adverstising but who wrote it, the guy selling the bees? I used to buy the magic bullet proof Babcock-Lightner bees, virtually verbatim sales pitch! Think 10 yrs later they've pretty much all died from mites and all the the things they were immune to. Every other year we have the great new bullet proof bee somewhere and every year we find out bees are pretty much bees, some with better traits, some with worse traits depending on the quality of the breeding program and stock.

    NZ is 2 years away from solving the mite problem with queens? How do they have any idea how long it will take and what obstacles they will encouter or how mites will adapt in 2 years? I'll keep buying the dependable stock I've used for years and rotate in the best qualities I can. I'll buy the new bullet proof bees after someone has acutally established such a thing can exist in nature.

  20. #19
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    Joel do you know of the reaserch being done in New Zealand, or are you speaking of personal opinion?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  21. #20
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    Joel,

    I am not the one sellling the bees. I have only bought a split from this man. He and I went to the same sourwood location this year and did well. He has really hit in on something. I say this from my perspectives. He selects qualities and then floods the field with these drones produced by the superior queens. Over the years they have, just as in nature, with a little coaxing extirpated the weaker traits in favor of the strong survivor colony. The only disadvantage is that their swarm tendancy is very strong. However, the swarms tend to make quite a bit of honey regardless. Mr. Goodman is also brilliant in making a profit in the business. I have learned from him who averages a yearly income of $40,000 how to make a profit in this fickle business.

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