Do I really need pollen patties for this spring ???
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  1. #1
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    Question Do I really need pollen patties for this spring ???

    I am not splitting, nor pollinating , nor queen raising this spring ?? I have good sources of early pollen here and I do plan to feed a little syrup . Do I really need to spend the extra on something like bee-pro ??


    I am trying to stay on budget for 08'



    Thanks Brad

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  3. #2
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    if your satisfied with the build up of your bees leading up to the first flow I would say dont bother with the patties.

    "stay on budget" what the heck is that cant say I have ever seen that in any beekeeping books

  4. #3
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    Like riverrat said.......... No need to feed if they are in good shape and you're not looking for fast take off.

    However, in light of the uncertainty on CCD and possible links to nutrition, feeding quality food makes sense. I feed pollen patties.
    Closing in on retirement.......

  5. #4
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    I also don't want to increase the number of my hives right now. I have constraints on the the amount of hives I can maintain. The only reason I will feed patties is to build up the colonies in order to perhaps get some comb [or liquid] honey from the early flow from the fruit trees, Black locust and Black raspberry; a few others maybe. Strong, populous hives are good for comb honey. If it is a good flow and capped I would like to remove it early. It is all for fun; a hobby for me.
    Last edited by Oldbee; 12-15-2007 at 06:59 PM.

  6. #5
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    I've been messing with the idea of pollen patties for several years. I can't say I can get mine on the hives before the natural pollen comes out (largely willow and maple).

    This year I've moved to laying pollen patties under sugar/candy boards.

    I'll have to let you know.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO

    http://www.MakingPlasticFramesWork.homestead.com
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  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunky View Post
    I am not splitting, nor pollinating , nor queen raising this spring ?? I have good sources of early pollen here and I do plan to feed a little syrup . Do I really need to spend the extra on something like bee-pro ??

    You have a good source of pollen early, you dont need the patties.
    You mention your not pushing them in anyway, other than honey production, natural build up is adequate.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #7
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    Experement! Try pollen patties on 1/2 of your hives and at the end of season which hives produced the most excess honey. Be sure to post the results for others.
    Clint
    Clinton Bemrose<br />just South of Lansing Michigan<br />Beekeeping since 1964

  9. #8
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    Spunky,
    If your going to feed sub do it in the fall.
    Merry Xmas

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunky View Post
    I am not splitting, nor pollinating , nor queen raising this spring ?? I have good sources of early pollen here and I do plan to feed a little syrup . Do I really need to spend the extra on something like bee-pro ??
    I am trying to stay on budget for 08'
    Thanks Brad

    At EAS this past summer, a speaker from...I think she's a Post Doc at Cornell...Ontario. I believe her name in Heather Matilla. Something like that. Anyway, she gave a great talk on pollen substitutes. Are they necessary and economical.

    I thought her science was quite good, and her logic made sense. She used brood area measurements, and colony production to judge whether PS was helpful.

    She showed over a number of seasons that indeed, pollen substitute did help the colonies build up faster and produce a larger crop. But, she also found that it doesn't make a difference every year. I can't remember the figures, but it only mattered one year in a few. In those years, the difference was significant.

    So, you have an early pollen flow. Except once in awhile, the season is delayed by weather, and the bees use up all their Fall stored pollen, and brood rearing stops...right when they need to be raising bees.

    So her conclusion was to feed. It doesn't really cost much per colony, and you don't know which year you need it until it's too late.

  11. #10
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    Clintonbermrose and Michael make some good points. The idea is to start feeding pollen patties before they start bringing in natural pollen, by the time that natural pollen sources are available brood rearing will be in full swing and they will be able to take advantage of early nectar flows instead of using energy to build up the hive population. This will give you and opportunity to make splits that will have more time to develop and will even give you a honey crop later in the year. Or if you donít want more hives the ones you have will give you more honey. Which will make you profit over the cost of the pollen substitute. It takes money to make money.
    The Busy Bee teaches two lessons: One is not to be idle and the other is not to get stung.

  12. #11
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    spunky writes:
    I am trying to stay on budget for 08'


    tecumseh chimes in:
    spunky there is the old saw about being penny wise and pound foolish. so my question spunky is how will this buck or so in expense effect you output? may I assume you are trying to collect something of a honey crop?

    like most (perhaps every would be a better word) systems, bees will only produce to the most limited resource (see Michael Palmer's response). the question: is pollen (protein) the most limiting source.... you could likely inspect the frames and determine via observation just how limiting pollen might be however the unknowns (once again reference Michael Palmer's response) of future event is what a pollen patties INSURES againist. so is this buck or so of insurance worth the money? for me yes it is. for you it is a question only you can answer.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by tecumseh View Post
    spunky writes:
    tecumseh chimes in:
    ....what a pollen patties INSURES againist. so is this buck or so of insurance worth the money? for me yes it is. for you it is a question only you can answer.
    +1

    key word: insurance

  14. #13
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    Default feeding

    So does anyone using bee-pro and 1:1 syrup know appx. how many patties one could get out of 2lb of mix ???



    Staying on budget is important in any facet of life, not just beekeeping


    Thanks for the replies

  15. #14
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    Big Grin How many swarms would you like to cast?

    Last year I was cleaning out a closet and found a full bag of "Brood Builder" from way back.
    As I was looking it over, trying to remember when it may have been purchaced, I noticed a rather offical looking warning label on the side:
    WARNING: THE OVERUSE OF THIS PRODUCT MAY RESULT IN TOO MANY BEES!
    Funny; but oh so true if you are not wanting to expand.
    I fed that bag and a number of bags of Beepro going into California last spring.
    I had, (have) bees coming out of my ears.
    I have exactly ONE more hive than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond dispute!

  16. #15
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    short answer is NO. If it weren't for pollination and nuc sales I probably wouldn't feed myself. I have great spring and early summer pollen flows in my area.

    Pollination and nuc sales require it for me.

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunky View Post
    So does anyone using bee-pro and 1:1 syrup know appx. how many patties one could get out of 2lb of mix ???



    Staying on budget is important in any facet of life, not just beekeeping


    Thanks for the replies
    For every pound of dry, you end up with about twice the poundage after mixing with sugar syrup/honey. You would have about 4 pounds, or 4 one pound patties.

  18. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by spunky View Post
    Staying on budget is important in any facet of life, not just beekeeping
    I just want to make a small correction in your statement.

    "Staying on budget is important in any facet of life, just not beekeeping"

    Just for the record, I made about $100 gross profit this year. Thanks to the West Virginia Bear Damage stamp sold to all bear hunters.
    What I Smoke has a Sting to it

  19. #18
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    There is a little know fact that leprechauns were in fact taken over to the New World with the settlers, and the american natives at the time called them "le tui inti ta oo minki" or in English "little green men who throw pollen sub at white man's flies" and this is how the honeybees have been surviving in the wild until the 1990's when leprechauns were actually mass killed by the beginning of global warming, but the subsequent decline of the honeybees was blamed on an innocent bystander, the varroa mites, who appeared about the same time.



    Seriously, though...if you do this for a hobby and for fun, and don't care about an extra 20 lbs of honey per hive, and would rather not have to fight swarms anymore than you already do, don't bother feeding the pollen sub. Most environments provide ample pollen in the fall and spring, and unless you are moving them or disrupting them by pollination they can make use of this.

    Rick

  20. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScadsOBees View Post
    don't bother feeding the pollen sub. Most environments provide ample pollen in the fall and spring, and unless you are moving them or disrupting them by pollination they can make use of this.
    Now there is a level headed answer!!

  21. #20
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    "For every pound of dry, you end up with about twice the poundage after mixing with sugar syrup/honey. You would have about 4 pounds, or 4 one pound patties".- BjornBee.

    Now that WOULD! be kind of expensive if you were putting on a pound per hive like some folks do;.. .. from what I have read.

    I have put on about a.. 5" diameter by 1/2" thick patty, 2.5 weeks before natural pollen; [Silver maple;willows,etc., March 1st] don't know how much that weighs; 1/3 pound?? I need to check that out for sure! The 1 lb. cannister [$6.00, Mann Lake] lasted for 2 seasons for 1-3 hives. I have been getting nice comb honey from the strong hives though. Four to six dollars a 4" by 4" around here. It is for fun,..a hobby.

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