how to become certified?
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Default how to become certified?

    What is the process to become a "certified Beeker".

    There is a test, is it a mutiple choice, how many questions ect.

    Is there a study guide for this?

    Where do you go to take the test?

    I saw the NC beekeepers website and it was alittle vague.

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  3. #2

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    There are several certifying agencies. Most of the "tests" have a written test, and a practical test. EAS is probably the most prestigeous organization that certifies beekeepers with their "Master Beekeeper" program.

  4. #3
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    Jan 2007
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    Whitsett, NC
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    The Guilford County Beekeepers Association in Greensboro, NC had a class for us new beeks. Most of the instructors were members a few were outside speakers. We met for 6 weeks and had a written test at the end. I can't remember how many questions but it was around 50 multiple choice. The club also followed up with a field day that allowed the new beeks to take the practical portion of the test. The practical portion was going into a hive and explaining what you see to a Master Beekeeper. There was a Q&A afterwards.

    I also believe you can take the test (s) at the state meeting, someone else needs to confirm this.
    There is a study guide on the NC state web site but, if you pay attention in class read the beginners books and enjoy learning about all the small details for a beginner bee keeper you should be fine. The test is geared for a beginner beekeeper.
    I feel very fortunate to live near a club where the members were willing to provide their time and effort for us newbees.

  5. #4
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    Feb 2004
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    Fredericksburg, Va
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    Virginia is just starting their Master Beekeeping Program. It will have three levels and the details can be see at http://www.virginiabeekeepers.org/Ma...perprogram.htm

    Also there is a small quiz available on a linkl from the home page http://www.virginiabeekeepers.org.

    The EAS program and website contains a list of recommended reading materials. http://www.easternapiculture.org/pro...mb/mbref.shtml
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  6. #5
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    Feb 2006
    Location
    Orlando, FL
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    1,314

    Default

    Is anyone doing this in Florida?
    Troy

  7. #6
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    Apr 2004
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    Wheatfield, IN
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    My first thought was... Who cares?

    But I'll keep it to myself.

    The question I will ask is...

    What motivates people to want to be a "Certified Master Beekeeper"? I just don't understand the point. Maybe there are reasons I don't understand which is usually the case!

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
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    5,604

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Williamson View Post
    What motivates people to want to be a "Certified Master Beekeeper"? I just don't understand the point.
    I'll take a stab at it.

    If I want advice on doing some electrical wiring in my home, would I feel more comfortable consulting with a trained "Certified" Electrician or "Joe handyman" from down the street? Even though Joe may in fact have more actual experience and knowledge than the "certified" electrician, there is reassurance in the advice from one who has been officially "trained" in his field.

    In our local beekeeping workshops "Certified Master Beekeepers" are usually solicited and encouraged to participate as instructors in the various segments. I think it probably gives both the speaker and those in attendance a certain level of confidence.
    To everything there is a season....

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by yoyo View Post
    What is the process to become a "certified Beeker".

    There is a test, is it a mutiple choice, how many questions ect.

    Is there a study guide for this?

    Where do you go to take the test?

    I saw the NC beekeepers website and it was alittle vague.
    Hi Yoyo, you may want to contact your local county extension office. I believe certain counties work with the NC State Beekeepers and the NCSU Dept of Entomology, Master Beekeeper program, to offer a short course in beginning beekeeping.

    At the the end of the course instruction, they generally administer the written portion of the exam which is sent to them from NCSU, and when the written is passed, you then participate in a 'practical exam'. Both the written and practical exams can be taken at the spring and summer meetings of the NC State Beekeepers Association. I do not believe the dates are set for 2008 yet.

    Here is a link to a jpg of our 2007 Short Course poster, if you can read it, to get an idea of the range of topics offered:
    http://www.honeybees-by-the-sea.com/2007%20poster.jpg

    Good luck! Donna Marie

  10. #9

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    I had an email that Dr Jamie Ellis (UF/IFAS) was putting together a program similar to this, but can no longer find the email. If EAS has there annual meeting anywhere near you, it is well worth attending. Next summer's meeting will be in Murray Kentucky (Murray State University) August 4-8. http://www.easternapiculture.org/

    Dan, These programs are orientated towards the Hobby level beekepers, who want to expand their knowledge of bees, most of the master level courses are quite scientific in nature. Those beekeepers who are trying to make a living keeping bees, will probably find the information in these courses to be not very useful.

  11. #10
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    Jun 2007
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    Thanks all, I attended the NC meeting in Kinston this year and I did see a couple of people out in the apiary getting the practical portion of the test. I did not know they gave the written part there. The reason for being motivated to become a certified beekeeper, as Mike stated, is because I want to make sure I am as knowledgable as I can be and have some sort of "proof" that I should know what I am doing. Hopefully that gives me some credentials that "might" come in handy and puts me one-up on the Joe-Smoe in some peoples eyes. Of course, the little lady with a swarm in her front yard might not care as long as those bees are gone!

  12. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Danbury,Ct. USA
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    Dan Williamson asks:>>>The question I will ask is...
    What motivates people to want to be a "Certified Master Beekeeper"? I just don't understand the point. Maybe there are reasons I don't understand which is usually the case!<<<<

    I just became a master beek at EAS this year. I'm a psychologist and I can't pin the motivation. I failed it twice just in case you think one can walk in and ace it. I overheard 2 top people in the field commenting that they wouldn't take the lab "cold." The process made me study as nothing else could. Tell the truth Dan, now that you know this about me, aren't you likely to give me at least a little more credibility than before? In the same way that I would give more credibility to folks that have either years experience or manage many colonies. I'm proudto be a ....

    Master Beekeeper,
    Dickm

    PS: Clarence Collisons book "What do you Know?" is a good study guide.

  13. #12
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    Jan 2007
    Location
    Whitsett, NC
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    575

    Default

    I had fun taking this entry level test as practice for the written exam. I think I took it 50-60 times trying to get all the different questions.



    http://www.gobeekeeping.com/test.htm

  14. #13
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    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
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    3,400

    Default

    There are many master beekeeper programs, but the bees are not
    all that impressed with any of them.

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    25

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    I know most of ever one on the site hates me but I wil say this.

    There is no such thing as a master beekeeper. There is all ways some thing new poping up like ccd, if they are such a master and know it all why don't we have a cure for all the crazy stuff that bee can get! We all ways lerning something new in the bee world. But you all get my point

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    285

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    SKI, I tried the link to the online test. I could not get it to load. Maybe a dead link. I even tried it from the main page on the website.

  17. #16
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    Apr 2006
    Location
    Atlanta, Georgia
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    yoyo, I'm doing the process in Georgia mostly because it is fun to learn more and more about the bees. The Master Beekeeper program here takes several years. I did the certified beekeeper (first level) last year at Young Harris in May (not too far from N Carolina if you'd like to come in May).

    I'm motivated because if I learn just what I need to as something comes up in my bee yard, then I'll probably miss some important bee information. The course was difficult - I believe that 60% of the people who took the first level passed, but a very small percentage (5 or so out of 30) of those who took the next level, journeyman, passed the first time. So the challenge increases over the levels.

    Also the certification program includes a commitment to public service regarding bees. In Georgia there are lots of opportunities. I spoke to the Atlanta History Center and that gives me one credit (out of the 5 I need for Journeyman). I'm in the process of trying to get the two people in charge of public service (Keith Delaplane and Robert Brewer) to allow me one public service credit for my blog...which gets an average of 100 hits a day from people all over the world. It's ticklish because public service in Georgia is usually defined as talking/informing people who are not already beekeepers....so speaking to a bee club (which I have also done) doesn't count.

    The only down side I can see to going through the program is that I have to learn all about pesticides used in the beehives and I am using no poisons anywhere in or near my hives. But that should make me more informed to participate in conversations with other beekeepers.

    In addition to finding out many parts of beekeeping that I would not have learned otherwise, the practical test was quite useful - we had to be able to identify frames indicating AFB, chalkbrood, etc. Also you learn interesting tidbits: A drone doesn't have a father, but does have a grandfather, for example! And Collison's book: What do you know? is a challenging learning tool.

    Linda T in Atlanta
    "You never can tell with bees...." Winnie the Pooh
    http://beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com

  18. #17
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    Aug 2004
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    Lincolnton Ga. USA.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Panhandle Bee man View Post
    I had an email that Dr Jamie Ellis (UF/IFAS) was putting together a program similar to this, but can no longer find the email. If EAS has there annual meeting anywhere near you, it is well worth attending. Next summer's meeting will be in Murray Kentucky (Murray State University) August 4-8. http://www.easternapiculture.org/

    .
    Here is the link and a way to contact Jamie Ellis. http://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/honeybee/
    Ted

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
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    2,082

    Default

    Thanks for the replies.

    I'm all for learning and discovering. Nothing wrong with that and more power to ya if you want to take the courses.

    dickm says:

    >>now that you know this about me, aren't you likely to give me at least a little more credibility than before?

    Don't take this wrong Dick. But the answer is NO. Well let me backup a little. It gives your attitude toward beekeeping more credibility. You obviously have the motivation and the desire to be informed about your hobby/craft. You are willing to put in some time and effort to learn more.

    However, I do the same thing without the "certification". I dare say that many people on this site are the type to dig in and research, understand, become informed, ask questions, seek out experts, find successful operations and try to learn from them.

    [SIZE=4]What it DOES NOT DO..... is make you a successful beekeeper.[/SIZE]

    A title with your name has nothing (in my opinion) to do with your credibility as a beekeeper. Are you book smart? I don't know. You knew enough to pass a test. I did plenty of that in college and promptly forgot most everything I had studied as it was in my short-term memory.

    Practical real-life application over the long-run is where I think its at.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with going thru such a program at all. New beekeepers are especially likely to be awed and wooed by such fancy titles.

    I'd likely ask you about your actual experiencexbackground in beekeeping before I'd assign any credibility to anyone. Not that we can't learn from each other. I just tend to be a little cynical/wary of the so-called expert instructors that show up at bee meetings (schools) and clubs. In my experience many are not the best beekeepers. Some are excellent.

    I am be no means an expert. I am constantly trying to learn from others and will share what little I know.

    Like I said... there is absolutely nothing wrong with wanting to learn and pursueing a certification if that sounds like something you want to do...

    As far as credibility though.... that decision I'll reserve for a case by case post discussion analysis!

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
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    812

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    >>>the bees are not all that impressed with any of them.

    But they may appreciate the better care that they would get from a knowledgeable beekeeper.

    Self-accomplishment is a more likely motive than an attempt to impress others for taking the trouble and pain to go through a certification process.

    >>>The only down side I can see to going through the program is that I have to learn all about pesticides
    I learned this lesson several years ago while taking certification testing from Microsoft - you will be testing no just on what your experiences and practices are, but also what others may be doing.

    And, none of us were born knowing all this stuff (except for the bees).
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  21. #20

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    i would do a course if they had one in ohio, last I check they didnt have a master course.

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