"unripe honey"
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Thread: "unripe honey"

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    69

    Post

    I recently removed my super and extracted honey. Some of the frames had areas that were not capped. It seemed that they were never going to finish. Anyway my honey seems to be a little thin. Sundance suggested I get a refractometer which I will do, but what is bad about having thin or unripe honey? I'm not selling it just using it myself. Thanks for your help and advice, Madison.....

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,397

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    It will ferment.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    53,948

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    >but what is bad about having thin or unripe honey?

    Like Chef said. It will ferment.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    69

    Post

    I only have about ten jars, will it ferment in days or weeks, months> THanks for the help. Madison....

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
    Posts
    1,833

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    Freeze what you are not consuming immediately (9 jars) but only fill three quarters full to be safe and it will be ready when you are.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Lee Center, NY
    Posts
    149

    Post

    Use it to make Mead.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    247

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    If you have uncapped honey at 22%, can you take the frames and use a fan, heater and dehumidifier to try to dry it in the comb prior to extraction? Can you get it down 4%?

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,400

    Post

    You can reduce moisture slowly on a drum or pail
    of honey in a lower-humidity environment,
    but most "honey driers" are machines that expose
    a think film of honey to warm and dry air, in
    an attempt to speed up the dehumidification.

    Now that fall is here, we may have less humid
    days and nights, so one need not even need
    fans or heaters to do the job.

    The magic number is any relative humidity
    below 60%, which will, if given enough time,
    take water out of your honey until the air
    and honey "reach equilibrium", which would
    mean that your honey would be at a 17.8%
    moisture level.

    So, on "dry" days, expose the honey to the
    air, and seal the top again at night when
    temperatures drop and dew points start to
    matter, and keep the honey sealed on "damp"
    days. Maybe stir the honey a bit to help
    expose honey that was not near the surface
    to help speed the process.

    It could take a while, depending upon how
    much honey is in the container (the best
    case "container" being uncapped comb, which
    is why one wants to use a refractometer to
    test supers before even removing them from
    the hives.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    69

    Post

    Thank you all for the advice. Since I'm eating the honey up quickly I will freeze a few and use it up before it ferments. Next year I will be smarter about a lot of things including owning a refractometer. But then I will be bugging you all for advice on how to use it, but then again this is a great website and I know you all will be here to help, Thanks Madison..........

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    campbell, ca
    Posts
    8
    Our first year (this is our 3rd) we had a super of uncapped honey and no refractometer. I put the whole super in a plastic bag and put it in the freezer. We took it out in the spring and gave it back to the bees and they finished it up, capped it, and it was perfect!!

    Tina
    Tina

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    4

    Post

    I reduced the moisture content of my honey (which was measured at about 18.5%) by putting it in a small room with a heater that had a fan, I stirred the honey every day gently for about a week, I also put some silica stuff in a container to absorb moisture from the air. I was actually amazed. I have not measured the honey again, but I know that it was certainly far more thick than when it first started out. I don't think that the silica would have an effect on the honey. Comments????

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