Wood Stoves - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 41

Thread: Wood Stoves

  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,525

    Post

    MountainCamp

    I'm really interested in what you think of your outside boiler.
    I already have a hot water heat system that heats the floors
    I drive it with a propane water heater
    of course propane is gonna go thru the roof
    the problem I see with the outside boilers like that is that since they cost > $5k I wonder how long they'll last
    I can get softwood fuel around here free just picking it up
    I'm just worried that since the firebox lives in such horrible environment, 1000F inside and 200F outside, how many years will it hold up?
    did you talk to folks who've had em for a while?
    I figure it'd have to last 10 years to make good sense

    Dave

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,034

    Post

    Dave, Ray Salmon, the dealer in Durham, says his has been in operation for 15 years so far, and he's still using it. I didn't discuss what repairs he has had to make. You might want to give him a call.

  4. #23
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,525

    Post


    I didn't know there was a dealer right up the road
    I've been reading about em on the web
    around here people haul pine out to the road and wait for the county to haul it off
    it pains me to see free fuel going to waste, but you can't burn it inside (actually some folks do)
    I'll look him up

    thanx

    Dave

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,034

    Post

    Pine burns good to clean out your chimney. Just be sure you open the draft wide and let it howl. The trouble comes when you turn the draft down to control the heat. You need hardwood to do that.
    Also, you don't want to wait too long between cleanouts. If the chimney gets too clogged you can set the inside of it ablase.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    690

    Post

    Pine always seem to get a bad rap when discussing
    wood stoves. Truth of the matter is pine is fine.
    However, it will not give you the same BTU’s as a good seasoned hardwood.

    Problem stems from the fact that people over buy a stove.
    They look at a stove and say, “that little thing can’t heat my huge house.
    I better get the next size up.”
    Soon they realize that the smaller one was what they needed as the larger one is driving them out of the room.
    So they let a hardwood fire smolder all day and night just to keep the room comfortable.

    Smoldering hardwoods creates creosote.
    The creosote clings to the chimney tiles/liner.
    Then when you burn pine, which burns very hot and fast, You catch the creosote on fire, then the fire department comes and tells you that you brought too big a stove for the area your trying to heat.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Post

    Here is a link for the Central Boiler Units.
    www.centralboiler.com/splash2.html

    I have a friend who's Central Boiler is still in service, 18 years later.

    This is my 3rd season.

    I would recommend the Central Boiler unit. I looked at alot of systems and they had the best designs by far. You can vary the water temperature with the Aquastat depending on the season.

    My whole system runs on (2) 1/25 hp circulating pumps.

    I burn almost 1/2 the wood I used to with the wood stove. I can burn free slab wood and I don't have to split wood.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,525

    Post

    hehe

    In my experience if you don't choke back the draft, "HOWL" is exactly what pine will do
    I've got one of those triple wall sheet metal flues and it gives me the heebie-jeebies to watch an open flame go up that thing

    Dave

    [size="1"][ October 13, 2005, 07:04 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  9. #28
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,525

    Post

    MountainCamp

    I've looked at their stuff before, I have a brochure
    Their website even has a section talking about metallurgy, it's an issue with this type of system
    I think they do a top notch job of it
    if I'm not mistaken they have changed the alloy they use from a few years ago
    I think it used to be 416 SS now it appears to be a titanium/unobtainium alloy [img]smile.gif[/img]
    I could be wrong, will have to go find my brochure
    iddee pointed me to a dealer right down the road, with the price of fuel I'll be talking to him soon

    Thanks for the info
    Dave

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Post

    I went with the steel unit.
    The furnace is controlled by an aquastat that opens and closes the draft door. It burns for a while and then shuts down and smolders till the water temperature drops below the setpoint range.
    You can set the draft opening.
    The nice thing about the furnace being stand alone, the house is safe.
    About once a month I open the door up and let her ripe to clean the stack.

    [size="1"][ October 13, 2005, 07:39 PM: Message edited by: MountainCamp ][/size]

  11. #30
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,525

    Post

    hmm
    in the online brochure I don't see an all steel option
    now that I know of a nearby dealer I'll go talk to him about options

    Dave

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    West Newton, Pa.
    Posts
    918

    Post

    drobbins

    If I interpret their manual correctly the CL models are regular steel and their SCL and HFSS models are a titanium stainless alloy.

    Tom
    Be Yourself, Everyone Else Is Taken!

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Post

    The CL units are steel.
    I use my furnace year round to heat my home and my domestic hot water during the off heating season.
    So the unit does not sit cold for any length of time, so there is no mositure on the fire side.
    I check the water level & chemistry on a regular basis so that the water side if good.
    If I was only going to use the unit part of the year, I might of looked harder at the SS option.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,034

    Post

    MountainCamp ,
    I would be curious as to the size of your stove and what the cost was 2 years ago. I wnat to see if there has been a large price increase corresponding to the oil price increases. The price I got was Approx. 4800.00 for the stove only, 10,500.00, fully installed for a 2000 sq. ft. house. How does this compare to when you put yours in?

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Post

    The 250,000 BTU/hr input unit ranaround $5,000.00 delivered.
    I purchased the Central Boiler CL5636 - 500,000 BTU/ HR input. approx 425,000 btu / hr output.
    The base price of the unit to fire with wood only was about $6,000.00. I opted for the duel fire version with propane as my back up fuel. The unit total was about $8,400.00
    I figured for $1,000.00 more I got twice the stove, larger firebox, longer burn times, less cycling and more store energy in the water.

    The delivery was included in the price.

    I did the installation myself for mine and last year I help a buddy install his.

    They are very easy to install. I am not a plumber by any means. I also installed radiant floor heart through out the house and a heat exchanger to do my domestic hot water.

    I plan on putting a pool in either this spring or next and I will be able to heat the pool for nothing as well. The season for swimming is too short not to heat it.

    My home is about 3,200 sf heated with the finished basement.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,082

    Post

    >>10,500.00, fully installed for a 2000 sq. ft. house.

    I know this is a thread on wood stoves but.....
    That sure is alot of $$. Go with a corn furnace. I got a 100,00btu furnace for around $5000. Runs off my thermostat. with corn prices at 1.56/bu I expect to burn about 325bu this winter. It doesn't heat your water though. It heats 2300sq ft finished plus the 1500 sq ft unfinished basement (so 3800sq ft total). Worth every penny. Wood may be free but you still have to cut it etc... I'm sold on heating with corn.

    I looked at Central Boiler but it was too expensive for my taste.

    [size="1"][ October 18, 2005, 12:58 PM: Message edited by: dtwilliamson ][/size]

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
    Posts
    1,888

    Post

    What are they doing for the $10,500.00 installed price?

    I like the outdoor furnace from the stand point that the fire is outside the house. I do not have to bring wood or corn or anything into the house. No dust, dirt, ashes, or storage issues.

    The boiler operates on an aquastat and the house circulating pump operates off the thermostat.

    The entire house is what ever temperature you set the thermostat to.

    I load the furnace up and it will go for days. Even at below 0F temps.

    My cutting is simple, I run a saw through a pile of wood. I can cut a pile of slab wood in a few mintues.

    I looked at my time cutting, loading and maintain the furnace, it is under 20 hours a year. I am saving about $50.00 a month on my electric hot water bill alone.

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,034

    Post

    I found that they were somewhat overpriced. I found the equal stove by Taylor, but much better made, fully installed, for 7500. Other than what mountaincamp said, I also like having the logs brought to me free and all I have to do is cut them to length. "One of my tennants runs a tree service"
    Also, corn here is 4.50 a bushel, not 1.65.

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,105

    Post

    All fuels are somewhat regional. For sure corn, wheat, etc. Wood can be pricy if you are in a metro area for sure. Having a slab wood source is a wonderful luxery that the majority can't access.

    I will be going with an outside boiler unit when funds allow due to the mess that has been commented on already. I burn wood with a forced air unit and the dust, ash, and mess does get old for sure.
    Closing in on retirement.......

  20. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Wheatfield, IN
    Posts
    2,082

    Post

    >>Also, corn here is 4.50 a bushel, not 1.65.

    Is that buying it in 50lb bags? I store my corn outside in a wagon that holds 117bu. (Got the wagon for free). I go to the farmer or coop down the road. Farmer I talked to on Sunday said he just sold it last Sat for $1.56 a bu. But then again..... I've got corn fields everywhere around me! [img]smile.gif[/img]

    There is a 2" flex line running from my wagon to a cylinder above my corn bin(12bu bin on side of furnace) My shop vac is hooked up to the cylinder and when turned on sucks corn from the wagon into the cylinder in my basement. It cleans the corn and when full it drops into the bin. Because the bin is 12bu, I can sometimes go 8-10 days without refilling if necessary (around 40-50 degrees). When it is very cold (teens or lower)I can go 2-3 days without filling. Because it is a complete furnace it hooks right into the ductwork and you get heat all thru the house. You DO need a chimney that it can hook up to though.

    My furnace will burn corn, rye, wheat, wood pellets, and cherry pits. I use corn but when I visited the manufacturer he was burning rye in his.

    http://www.ja-ran.com/superior.php

    Disclaimer: I have no relationship with the above manufacturer other than I own their 100,000 btu furnace.

    I got quotes for Central Boiler for $7000 delivered. Installation was more. When I told the dealer that I had no interest in paying that kind of price he started dropping his price immediately. You can definately negotiate with these guys. I knew he couldn't get down to my price and with the easy availability of corn he couldn't beat it. I have free wood myself. I live in the woods and can get all I want. Corn is actually less work for me with my current set up.

    At least research it. If corn is that high for you there, I would think that wood is probably your best bet. I'm sure you can get the corn for cheaper but maybe not cheap enough to make a difference. Had I gone with a wood boiler, I would have used the Central Boiler. It seemed to be the best quality out there and certainly has a good track record from my research. I know people who love their outdoor wood furnaces.

    Good luck with your decision.

  21. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Jenison, MI
    Posts
    1,514

    Post

    Don't know if you've decided yet, but if you wait too much longer, you're better off waiting till spring. I know the pellet stoves are going really fast. I imagine most other alternative heaters are too.

    I just installed the Quadrafire SantaFe, it is a very nice stove and quite convenient, and can burn corn or pellets. I considered woodstoves, but then with the process of installing a chimney, the overall heat of the unit and the clearance plus the fact that they aren't much less I decided I'd just go with the Quadrafire.

    It is nice and small, the flue pipe goes in really easy, runs on a thermostat (autoignite) and costed as much or less as other models I looked at. If size matters, then this is a nice compact machine for you.

    Pellets aren't much cheaper than gas right now, but that is supposed to change soon. Corn is still cheaper.

    I bought mine a month and a half ago. I didn't buy the pipe right away, and had a bit of a time getting that.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •