Wood Stoves
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Thread: Wood Stoves

  1. #1
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    May 2003
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    Looks like I'm gonna have to put a stove in. Any thoughts about brand names from those who use them? I'm looking for a free-standing stove in the 25-30,000btu range with as close to zero clearance as possible. I looked at the QuadraFire and Earth Stoves today. (Man, no one is giving stoves away)
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

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  3. #2
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    Feb 2003
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    lewisberry, Pa, usa
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    I would look for a wood-burning stove. A wood stove seems like a one time thing if you know what I mean. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  4. #3
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    I would look for a wood-burning stove. A wood stove seems like a one time thing if you know what I mean.
    I've always had trouble matching the appropriate materials to the technology. You should see my adobe migratory hives.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  5. #4
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    May 2005
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    Knoxville, TN
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    Coyote, check out masonry wood stoves. I especially like the Bavarian kind, I had a chance to make a couple of trips to Germany. They are the traditional way to heat your house in Bavaria. EXTREEMELY efficient. They build a fire in them once a day and thats it. The heat slowly radiates from the stone throught the day. Its basically a fire box with lots of passages for the smoke to travel within the masonry to absorbe the heat. There is lots of different ways to do it.

    here's a link about masonry stoves
    http://mha-net.org/

    You will see they are extremely expensive, unless of course you can build one yourself which is what I plan to do. I'm afraid I have waited to late this year but may try and start on it this winter. The gas bills will be a motivation.

    If you look into it post any more links you find. I need to learn more about designs to costome fit one in my house. It will be smaller than the Bavarian kind, it dosen't get bavarian cold here anyway.

  6. #5
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    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    What fuels do you have available in NM coyote???

    I imagine you are doing only "space" heating for the most part. The are a bunch of freestanding quality air tight wood stoves for $500.
    Closing in on retirement.......

  7. #6
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    Farmington, New Mexico
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    What fuels do you have available in NM coyote???
    Wood - Pinon, oak, aspen, ponderosa, cedar, juniper. Not much in the way of hardwood.
    Coal
    Pellets
    Uranium (too much preparation)
    Plenty of oil and natural gas, which I'm trying to avoid using.

    Stopped by Home Depot and Lowe's today. Sold out. No stoves.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  8. #7
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    Check ebay and sort by "distance: nearest first" you may get lucky
    Closing in on retirement.......

  9. #8
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    Also with most of those woods cresote is a problem. Especially on highly efficient stoves.

    A less efficient stove is probably a better idea than a super air tight.
    Closing in on retirement.......

  10. #9
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    Mar 2005
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    Pikeville North Carolina
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    <You should see my adobe migratory hives.

    That is so funny, I got a visual from that comment..I really would like to see a pic...

  11. #10
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    Jun 2002
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    parker county, tx
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    Vermont Castings and Jotul make nice wood-burning stoves. They can be a little pricey, but both have an excellent reputation for function and for looks.
    So many weeds.......so little time.

  12. #11
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    Oct 2002
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    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
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    I bought an Earth Stove in 1982 when the price of natural gas went sky high. I heated my house exclusivly with it for a few years, the only time the furnace, (set at 65), would come on is if we left for the weekend.

    I liked it but hated digging out the ashes. It took being there at the right time and some manipulation to get the ash out without the coals. Need gloves and long handeled tools.

    Some of the newer ones now have shaker grills on the bottom to help cleanout but raise a lot of dust in the house. No matter what you do, unless the unit sets outside, you are going to have a lot of ash dust all over the house, and either you are going to go domestic or you are going to hear about it constantly.

    Another consideration is that the dry heat will dry out your house, don't forget to keep your woodwork, especially the furniture oiled or it will start splitting. The again you live in NM, you might not even have humidity to begin with.

    I would opt for the outside model.
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  13. #12
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    May 2000
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    Fremont, New Hampshire, USA
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    It's not the wood that dries out your house. It's more that relative humidity is much lower in the winter time. Open the front door and a bunch of cold air comes rushing in. Raising the temperature of that cold air will cause the relative humidity of that air to go down. If lots of cold air leaks in, then the relative humidity of the air inside the house will drop a lot.
    So don't yell at the kids for letting all the heat out, yell at them for letting all that dry air in! [img]smile.gif[/img]
    But then again I like the mini lighting bolts to the door knobs - static discharge! [img]smile.gif[/img]

    [size="1"][ October 12, 2005, 11:31 PM: Message edited by: The Honey House ][/size]

  14. #13
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    Jun 2005
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    Search for drum stoves, or similazr. They are kits you use to make your own stove from 55 gallon drums. You can buy a single drum kit, or a two drum kit.

  15. #14
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  16. #15
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    Search for drum stoves, or similazr
    No drums in my casa. I was traumatized by them as a teen.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  17. #16
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    Apr 2002
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    Round Top, New York - Northern Catskill Mtns.
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    If you have the space..
    I installed a Central Boiler outdoor wood furnace 2 years ago, after heating with a wood stove and fireplace for the last 12.
    I would not go back to the wood stove.
    The outdoor furnace is the best of both worlds. Mt heating costs are zero and I do not have the smoke, wood, insects, ashes, and dust in the house. I don’t have to split wood, nor carry it into the house. The furnace also has a several day burn time, as opposed to several hours for the wood stove. There is no problem burning soft wood or even green wood, as the unit is free standing away from the house. I burn mostly slab pine that I get for free and only use the good hard wood when it gets really cold.
    The furnace ties into your current heating system.

  18. #17
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    Jul 2004
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    MountainCamp,

    I think I've seen what you're talking about sitting half hidden in a couple of back yards around here. They look like a little shed with a short smoke stack coming out the top. Is that what you're talking about?

    Are they a hot water system that you plumb into the house with a heat exchanger in the furnace, or how do they work?

    It looks like with such a short stack that smoke isn't released very high up and could be a problem at ground level; or don't you find it to be a problem.

    I wouldn't mind having one of these to heat the greenhouses, which as you can imagine cost a bundle to keep warm on cold winter nights.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  19. #18
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    The unit I have from Central Boiler looks just like a shed. It is duel fired wood / propane. The unit can be run on wood, wood w/ propane to start it, wood with propane back up, or propane only. I have yet to put a tank to it.
    It is very windy here so the short stack is not a problem. They do have stack extensions to get it up abit.
    It is a hot water boiler and can be tied to a forced hot air, baseboard, or radiant heating system.
    You can tie it directly to the existing system or use a heat exchanger to isolate the outdoor unit.
    I put radiant floor heat through the house, and my wife loves it. I like the heating costs - nothing. I get my wood for free, and I have converted by domestic hot water over to the wood unit as well using an inline heat exchanger. Hot water on demand and never run out.

  20. #19
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    Apr 2005
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    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    I have two fireplaces in my house, used to burn eight hundred to a thousand gallons of fuel oil and burn about ten cords of hardwood, the heat almost totally went up the chimneys (13 inch square flue tile), then I heard about a company named sotz in Ohio. Bought two kits for fifteen to thirty five gallon drums. Bought two "stainless steel 35 gallon" drums and cut out for the round door and six inch stove pipe coupler. One stove would keep the house warm down to the outside temperature of thirty degrees, two stoves would entirely heat the house and we could heat for a winter with six cords of wood. Sotz is no longer in business (too many houses burned down) but we still have the stoves for an emergency situation such as no power because of an ice storm or whatever. We now heat with natural gas but I always liked the outdoor boilers for heat and domestic hot water. If I were doing it now that is the way I would go.
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  21. #20
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    Farmington, New Mexico
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    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

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