Noticed my 1st swarm cell.... Help please [Archive] - Beesource Beekeeping Forums

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Scottankarens
05-30-2017, 03:26 AM
Yes, I noticed my first swarm cell today in one of my hives. Of course I don't want to lose any bees, so what should I do? I've got a nuc box that I could use it necessary. Help please.

Tenbears
05-30-2017, 08:06 AM
Are we sure it is a cell and not a cup? Is there only one? Once you see cells the swarm urge is strong. A break down of the hive sufficient to make the bees believe the hive has already swarmed is usually necessary. Split off the queen and ample bees stores and open comb into the nuc. Move it to another location so you maintain a field force within the nuc. and manage your q-cells. Before you do all this make sure it is an impending swarm and not a supersedure.

Scottankarens
05-30-2017, 08:21 AM
Are we sure it is a cell and not a cup? Is there only one? Once you see cells the swarm urge is strong. A break down of the hive sufficient to make the bees believe the hive has already swarmed is usually necessary. Split off the queen and ample bees stores and open comb into the nuc. Move it to another location so you maintain a field force within the nuc. and manage your q-cells. Before you do all this make sure it is an impending swarm and not a supersedure.


Thank you for your response! Your question are very good ones and I guess I'm not seasoned enough to answer them adequately as I do not know the difference between a queen cell and a cup. With in the hive, I only noticed (1) of these (In hide site I wish I would have gotten a picture of it). It is toward the top of the frame and it is capped. How can I can tell if it is a supersedure vs a swarm cell?

tech.35058
05-30-2017, 10:22 AM
Supercedure cells are often just a single queen cell.
Some times in the middle of the comb, or any where.
Swarm cells are usually
multiple cells, often at the bottom of the frame, but also any where.
Web search queen cell images, & queen cell cup images.
While you are looking, check out worker & drone cell images too.
Good Luck! CE

Scottankarens
05-30-2017, 11:18 AM
Supercedure cells are often just a single queen cell.
Some times in the middle of the comb, or any where.
Swarm cells are usually
multiple cells, often at the bottom of the frame, but also any where.
Web search queen cell images, & queen cell cup images.
While you are looking, check out worker & drone cell images too.
Good Luck! CE

More great info, thank you! So can I assume that if it is a supercedure, I just let it be and let the colony replace the Queen? Are there specific steps that I should take?

Barry
05-30-2017, 04:16 PM
See the difference here: https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?237911-Beekeeping-Glossary

Queen cell/queen cup

Tenbears
05-30-2017, 04:36 PM
The difference between a swarm cell and a supersedure cell. In in the case of a swarm cell, The cup is drawn and the queen lays in it. Because of this the bees generally choose a spot where vertical cells can easily be drawn without obstruction As in the case of bottom of the frame or from drone comb extending beyond the frames. As where a supersedure cell a queen cell is drawn around a newly hatched larva. Which is why the adage is a supersedure cell is generally within the normal brood nest. If it is capped it is a cell for sure and not a cup.

I really wish you had pictures. Not trying to make light of your knowledge, Past experience has taught me to ask. Do you know what drone cells look like and are you certain this is not a drone cell?

Scottankarens
05-30-2017, 05:44 PM
The difference between a swarm cell and a supersedure cell. In in the case of a swarm cell, The cup is drawn and the queen lays in it. Because of this the bees generally choose a spot where vertical cells can easily be drawn without obstruction As in the case of bottom of the frame or from drone comb extending beyond the frames. As where a supersedure cell a queen cell is drawn around a newly hatched larva. Which is why the adage is a supersedure cell is generally within the normal brood nest. If it is capped it is a cell for sure and not a cup.

I really wish you had pictures. Not trying to make light of your knowledge, Past experience has taught me to ask. Do you know what drone cells look like and are you certain this is not a drone cell?

I take no offense in you asking. 😁 Yes I am confident that I know the difference between drone cells and queen cells.
I'll try to get a picture for you.

I'llbeedan
05-31-2017, 07:12 AM
If it is a swarm cell and it is capped then the hive has already swarmed the queen leaves with a percentage of the bees when the swarm cells are capped. If it is a capped supersedure. then you are on your way to a new queen. Although you may want to check to be sure you do not have too many queen cells in the hive, there is not much else you can do at this point.

NH-Murph
06-05-2017, 04:29 PM
I also am dealing with my first swarm. Mine up and left though. Definitely currently queenless in one hive, but have 3 queen cells, so I will make a nuc with some strong frames from my other hive and leave the other cells to hatch in the hive that swarmed. Still lots of workers and drones, but no queen. At least that was the advice I was given, so I am going to roll with it.

Sambarakat2
04-28-2018, 03:36 PM
i noticed that i have queen cell in my one years old hive so i did a split witch it was successful .one week later i see more queen cell,i removed all queen cell and add more space for bees to bill comb ,still see more queen cell every week .dose it work if i swap the queen from the new split to the mother hive?by the way this is my last year hive that i bought as a packaged bees.please help thanks.

DerTiefster
04-28-2018, 08:45 PM
The publication linked by little_john in post 17 of this thread:
https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?344513-supercedure-v-emergency-queens
looks like a good read for you. I don't know how you did your earlier split(s), but perhaps a "fly-back" split could end the drama. Putting the queen and a frame of brood in a new box on the original location and moving the old box away could shift the colony into newly swarmed mode where establishing the colony is the new universal goal. The material in the publication is likely to be useful to you.

Michael