World War II Apiary Sign [Archive] - Beesource Beekeeping Forums

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naturebee
11-10-2015, 03:48 PM
circa. 1943 - World War II era poster which highlights bees' vital role in national defense.
The Ohio State University prepared this sign for placement in apiaries.

21846

In an article written in 1942 during World War II, G.H. Cale quotes an official in the office
of price administration who calculated that there are approximately 350 uses for beeswax
in the navy and army and about 150 uses in the pharmaceutical field. Some of the uses were
to waterproof canvas tents, belts, metal casings of bullets, cables and pulleys.

In a Newsweek article, the War Food Administration urged beekeepers to conserve every
bit of beeswax, as it was needed as a war product in 1942-43

Source:

A History of Honey in Georgia and the Carolinas, 2015 Page 58

American Bee Journal, Page 315, 1943

Joe
https://www.facebook.com/Historical.Honeybee.Articles

mcon672
11-10-2015, 03:53 PM
Had to laugh at "hunters please do not shoot". They should put that on all the road signs around here. :)

Westhill
11-10-2015, 07:06 PM
This is great! Thanks for posting.

Phoebee
11-10-2015, 07:29 PM
Had to laugh at "hunters please do not shoot". They should put that on all the road signs around here. :)

We USED to have that sign-shooting problem around Keyser and Romney WV. Then the vandals got with the times and started paint-balling the signs, which is apparently just as much fun but washes off. I guess Triadelphia is still a little backwards, tho' ;)

I had some problem when somebody shot up a cat litter bucket I had half-buried in the ground in which I stored some target shooting supplies, and an old wooden stand I leaned the rifles on. I finally posted a sign on it with an arrow pointing them to the target backstop. "Not a target. Shoot that way." No damage since then.

I do love this bee sign.

jim lyon
11-10-2015, 08:35 PM
That's interesting, I'd never thought about the value of beeswax at the time. My uncle, after failing his military physical, expanded the family bee business and did quite well during the war years as honey prices hit record highs because sugar was a rationed commodity that was in very short supply. He also was issued a permit to buy a new truck for the business which was pretty rare during the war years.

Michael Palmer
11-11-2015, 04:46 AM
expanded the family bee business and did quite well during the war years as honey prices hit record highs because sugar was a rationed commodity that was in very short supply.

That's when the honey subsidy started too, isn't it? That subsidy lasted until about 1991 when Clinton and Armie ended it to balance the budget.

naturebee
11-14-2015, 05:58 AM
Very good Michael.

Honey Price Support Program
https://www.beesource.com/resources/usda/honey-price-support-program/


USDA02: Eliminate Federal Support for Honey
http://govinfo.library.unt.edu/npr/library/reports/ag02.html

jim lyon
11-14-2015, 06:20 AM
Interesting links. It appears there wasn't a need for price supports during the war but honey prices dropped considerably in the years immediately following the war. I remember my father telling me that 1948 was there best (per colony) production but that it was worth very little.

Roland
11-21-2015, 07:55 PM
I can remember a wartime sign that warned against damaging hives, with a very stiff penalty. I will look for it next week.

Crazy Roland

Roland
12-02-2015, 09:48 PM
I was wrong. Our wisconsin sign shares elements with the OP's sign. Next time I am at the shop I will try to photograph it.

Crazy Roland

BWrangler
12-06-2015, 05:33 PM
Hi Guys

Man does this bring back memories. I can even smell them now!

Almost 50 years ago, I worked for Cliff Weller, a commercial beekeeper who had a stack of those signs in a cabinet, along with all kinds of other stuff accumulated 50 years before that.

He told me that they were just a scare tactic and had no actual method of enforcement, So he never put them up.

Years later, I ran the outfit and decided to clean it up. A lot of junk got trashed. But I put the signs back in the cabinet.

I wonder if they are still around?

-dm

naturebee
12-10-2015, 05:11 PM
Go get up Wrangler.

What a great collectors item that would be.

-Joe