Charles Dadant [Archive] - Beesource Beekeeping Forums

View Full Version : Charles Dadant



aunt betty
08-01-2015, 05:14 PM
I wonder if the Dadant factory in Hamilton, Illinois has any of the tools they used when they first started production of bee hives. I think it was 1875. No power tools so it must have been quite a process to produce all the mortice cuts and all the cuts on the frames etc. I imagine a hundred men with hand miter saws and special jigs. Could be wrong.
Is there a museum? Has anyone been there?

deknow
08-01-2015, 05:19 PM
I have an AI Root catalog from the 1880s or 1890s. Among other things, they list (and show) saws setup to make beehives...tablesaws with ganged blades on a common spindle spaced to cut hive components. Saws are described as being treadle powered, with steam power being available at an extra cost.

aunt betty
08-01-2015, 05:34 PM
I have an AI Root catalog from the 1880s or 1890s. Among other things, they list (and show) saws setup to make beehives...tablesaws with ganged blades on a common spindle spaced to cut hive components. Saws are described as being treadle powered, with steam power being available at an extra cost.
Had a feeling they had "amish" powered saws. Thanks.

SS Auck
08-01-2015, 05:41 PM
amish powered being gas engine outside with belts driving all saws?

Vance G
08-01-2015, 07:29 PM
I bet they had a steam jenny pulling belts for power if not next to a river then it could have been water power. 1875 was pretty well into the industrial revolution. Low cost items like bee boxes and frames would not pay for all that hand labor.

Biermann
08-01-2015, 07:45 PM
I wonder if the Dadant factory in Hamilton, Illinois has any of the tools they used when they first started production of bee hives. I think it was 1875. No power tools so it must have been quite a process to produce all the mortice cuts and all the cuts on the frames etc. I imagine a hundred men with hand miter saws and special jigs. Could be wrong.
Is there a museum? Has anyone been there?

Sorry aunty, but 1875 were not the dark ages anymore, certainly no pc's but he people in thus days (I feel) made more changes then we can imagine! North America in thus days was short of people and long of work.

Cheers, Joerg

aunt betty
08-02-2015, 05:21 AM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Dadant

The American story, Charles Dadant. Not much is good about Illinois but am proud to have had him here.

lowhog
08-03-2015, 06:26 PM
Ever been to Phelps Mill on the Ottertail river? Many gears, drive belts for elevators, grinders, machines. All the machinery was run by water flow.

naturebee
08-05-2015, 05:37 AM
Saw mills in those days were probably powered by water, or coal fired steam. Gasoline was not used at that time, it wasn't until 1892 with the invention of the automobile that gasoline was recognized as a fuel. Good topic, will try and dig up some info on early mills that manufactured beeware.

Best Wishes,
Joe Waggle
https://www.facebook.com/Historical.Honeybee.Articles