Clover/buckwheat innoculant [Archive] - Beesource Beekeeping Forums

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JOHNYOGA2
04-09-2009, 11:16 AM
I'm going to plant a few small areas with vetch, dutch clover and Buckwheat (about 6000 square feet each). It won't be enough for any serious production, but it might give them something interesting to do in late August. When I picked up the clover seeds, the lady at the feed store recommended, and sold me, a small packet of innoculant that she said would help the clover seed germinate faster. That sort of made sense as I recall doing something like that to pea and bean seeds in the past. My question is would innoculant also be helpful for the vetch and buckwheat since they are all nitrogen fixers?

Walliebee
04-09-2009, 11:54 AM
My question is would innoculant also be helpful for the vetch and buckwheat since they are all nitrogen fixers?

Only legumes (clovers, peas vetches, beans and others in their family) are nitrogen fixers. To 'fix' nitrogen they must host certain becteria in their roots. This beaceria occurs naturaally in soil, but by adding an innoculant at planting you assure that relationship from an early stage in the plants life allowing for a stronger, healthier plant. There are different bacteria for different legumes. Make sure to get the correct innoculant for the seed you are planting.

Buckwheat is often called a phosphorus (P)“scavenger” because it can take P from the soil more efficiently than other plants can. The roots of buckwheat also exude substances that helps break down P that is unavailable to other plants. It does not fix nitrogen.

JOHNYOGA2
04-09-2009, 12:07 PM
THANKS!

Guess since it's always lumped in as a "green manure" I assumed it was a nitrogen fixer.

Jesse
04-09-2009, 03:15 PM
Only legumes (clovers, peas vetches, beans and others in their family) are nitrogen fixers. To 'fix' nitrogen they must host certain becteria in their roots. This beaceria occurs naturaally in soil, but by adding an innoculant at planting you assure that relationship from an early stage in the plants life allowing for a stronger, healthier plant. There are different bacteria for different legumes. Make sure to get the correct innoculant for the seed you are planting.

Buckwheat is often called a phosphorus (P)“scavenger” because it can take P from the soil more efficiently than other plants can. The roots of buckwheat also exude substances that helps break down P that is unavailable to other plants. It does not fix nitrogen.

Yep - buckwheat doesn't fix N but does help with P - it's root system is also good for giving the soil some structure when turned over for the next planting.

Black Creek
04-22-2009, 11:33 AM
the innoculant may or may not work for both the clover and vetch. I'm not sure but they probably use different types of bacteria, but some innoculants are a blend of several types and others are more specific.

sagittarius
04-26-2009, 10:28 AM
Inoculant bacteria has nothing to do with germination, and is not required for growth. Legumes will use Nitrogen in the soil just like any other green plant. The correct inoculant bacteria simply insures the legume might be able to grow nitrogen fixating nodules on its roots ... if the specific bacteria is not already in the soil. This nitrogen can be utilized by the legume in times of stress, or by the next crop after the plant dies. White clovers would use a type AB inoculant, Vetches a type C inoculant, crimson and berseem clovers type R, soybeans type S.

MapMan
04-26-2009, 02:02 PM
Inoculants are not just for nitrogen-fixing plants. There are microbial inoculants (bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi) which actually develop a dependence role with the host plant to assist in the plant's ability to increase the break down and absorption of nutrients, and help in plant health.


MM

FishCop
05-25-2009, 03:24 PM
There was considerable discussion about buckwheat at the BeeMaster course this year, and the consensus was overwhelmingly of the opinion there are varieties on the market that do not produce nectar. I always put my fallow ground in buckwheat just for the bees to have something going into the fall, but if they don't all produce nectar how do you know which variety to get? Thanks a bunch.
FC

DRUR
05-25-2009, 04:14 PM
Did you get vetch or hairy vetch? Here in Texas hairy vetch produces 8 flowers instead of 1 for each plant, and a lot more hardy concerning freezes, but we plant it in the fall for late spring production. Hairy vetch seems to produce more nectar and the bees work it heavy, have seen the time when bees didn't do much with regular vetch.

Danny

carbide
06-01-2009, 01:11 PM
There was considerable discussion about buckwheat at the BeeMaster course this year, ....... but if they don't all produce nectar how do you know which variety to get? Thanks a bunch.
FC

I buy Mancan. The bees love it and produce some of the darkest, richest honey that I sell out in no time.