Overview, the big picture [Archive] - Beesource Beekeeping Forums

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Barry
08-12-2008, 01:31 PM
Focus: What needs to be considered before taking the first step.

iddee
08-12-2008, 01:58 PM
Visit a beekeeper.
Check out the library, google for info, READ,READ,READ.
Revisit the beek with questions that came up from reading.
Locate and visit local beek club..
Go into another's hive with them.

Now, do you want to continue with bees???

Barry
08-12-2008, 02:04 PM
Know what the cost of the initial startup equipment/bees are and what the time commitment will be.

Dan Williamson
08-13-2008, 06:19 AM
READ!!!

Find a local beekeeper...

Get some beekeeping books and READ!.

Spend some time with a beekeeper. Ask questions like... what percentage of your colonies die every year... Do you have to buy bees every year?

If they have to buy bees every year or if they lose large percentages of colonies every year... then FIND A DIFFERENT BEEKEEPER TO LEARN FROM!

READ!

Did I mention READ?

Try to get yourself as knowledgeable as possible before aquiring any bees. I see folks asking questions sometimes about topics that are covered in every beekeeping book I've ever read! It is obvious they have done little to educate themselves prior to getting bees. Do your homework.

READ!

You won't learn everything from reading... but it will give you a good start!

Cyndi
08-13-2008, 06:17 PM
....then after you read, read, read.......

last month I met a beekeeper who had some really good advice. He said that people were always asking him where the best source of beekeeping knowledge was at. His answer: look in the mirror, YOU are the best source.

I can't tell you how many times that I have known the answer to my own questions, only to doubt myself, then not act on the answer I knew, only to ask someone else's opinion, only to find out later that I should of listened to my internal intellect. Beekeeping is such a Zen thing, :)

Best wishes and good luck!

mike haney
08-13-2008, 07:16 PM
i'm sure there are zillions but i personally have never met a beekeeper that didnt have a pet. something about the desire and ability and intellegence and patience to care for another creature seems to be a requirement, and a decent preparation.

MichelinMan
08-14-2008, 10:25 AM
Get stung. It's gonna happen anyway. Find out how you react before you get too involved. Learn your flora. Talk to farmers. Attend beekeeping associations meetings. Do nature walks. Oh yeah... did some one mention "read"?. Also when you're ready to go... start small. Build stuff yourself if you can. And most important have fun with it.

tecumseh
08-15-2008, 04:26 AM
read and study a bit... read some more. one of the real changes in my lifetime is information is so much more at your finger tips than when I started beekeeping.

find an individual beekeeper or club and do.. get into a hive, build some equipment. try to implement at least part of what you learned.

and yep always smile (enjoy)... the girls are easier to sneak up on when you smile.

Dan Williamson
08-15-2008, 06:27 AM
i'm sure there are zillions but i personally have never met a beekeeper that didnt have a pet. something about the desire and ability and intellegence and patience to care for another creature seems to be a requirement, and a decent preparation.

Funny... I don't have a pet and don't want one! I have many many pet bees though... oh yeah... they all have names too! LOL

Barry
08-15-2008, 07:08 AM
What book(s) would you recommend?
My first book was FIRST LESSONS IN BEEKEEPING by C.P. Dadant, and I'd still recommend it.

NasalSponge
08-15-2008, 01:31 PM
One of my first and all time favorite books... The How-To-Do-It book of beekeeping by Richard Taylor. It is dated so newer books MUST be used as well but as for the parts of beekeeping that never change....IMHO this is a great book. Then there is the bible...ABC-XYZ's of bee culture.

xC0000005
08-16-2008, 01:18 PM
First book - Beekeeping for Dummies. I hear this book scoffed at at meetings some times but I never regretted reading it, in fact it was very well done. Interestingly enough a friend gave me a (several decades old) copy of "First lessons in beekeeping" and as I read through it I am struck by how similar they are. The "dummies" book is a more entertaining read but the material covered is pretty much identical. Of course I got my copy of beekeeping for dummies for $1 and I was given "first lessons in beekeeping" so I can't complain price wise about either.

tedstruk
08-16-2008, 06:47 PM
My suggestion is kind of dumb. Bees need to spend time alone to build their colony. You need to watcha nd learn from them. Get some bees and plan on losing them. Don't open them, just learn about them. You will be suprised at how much you don't really understand about bee cultures, societies and colonies. After you know how basic insect lifestyle works, you will be alot better beekeeper. I watched them for too long(7 years). I think I am part of their world now.... this is my first year of apiary work...

tedstruk
08-16-2008, 06:49 PM
And... I would say you need to assess the amount of work there is in beekeeping. Take the number of days you plan on working per month and times it by 7. That is the work you will need to do. Take that time and add any special stuff to it such as honey recovery, super work, and nucleus building. There's the time and effort.... sure you want to be a beekeeper?

RayMarler
08-16-2008, 09:15 PM
Read...
The Hive and the Honeybee... Dadant publications
First Lessons in Beekeeping... Dadant publications
Bee Sex Essentials... Lawrence Conner
Increase Essentials... Lawrence Conner
A Years Work in an Out Apiary... Doolittle
Fifty Years Among the Bees... Miller
Fat Bees Skinny Bees... https://beesource.com/resources/elements-of-beekeeping/beekeeping-articles-worth-reading/fat-bees-skinny-bees/


WebPages...
http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm
http://www.beehive.org.nz/tips-and-advice/tips-advice-index.htm
http://www.voiceofthehive.com/
https://www.beesource.com

Join a local beeclub
Get a mentor that you can work their hives with them

Get a hive with bees, with extra box or 2 with frames
Keep that one hive for a year, maybe increase to 2 hives the first year. Work that hive every week, slowly, gently, just to look and learn and get comfortable with the bees. Get so you can see eggs and find the queen. Get so you can recognise Pollen, Open Nectar, Sealed Honey, Eggs, Larvae, Sealed Brood.

Again, get a mentor that you can work their hives with them. I worked hives with a mentor once a week for over a year myself, the experience with invaluable.

NasalSponge
08-17-2008, 11:30 AM
Great stuff here ...I would like to emphasize one more time an indispensable experience....get with a beekeeper and get among the bees. This is the litmus test. You will either be filled with joy, wonder, and amazement (you have the heart of a beekeeper)....or fear and dread (find another hobby). If you experience the first....it will be a stronger addicition than anything else on the planet and you will bee hooked forever!:)

paulnewbee1
08-18-2008, 10:22 AM
This is my 2nd year

1) screened bottom boards many of the company's sell a starter kit but no screened bottom board just the solid.

2) Mite counts how many before you treat with something? and pics of what mites look like on a sticky board for us new-bees. there is lots of solids on the board hard to tell what they look like on a sticky board after a sugar treatment.

3) What is the best treatment for Mites so many all say there are the best.

4) how to make a sugar fond board for winter.

5) how to make sugar water and like 1 lb to 1lb of water many told me 2to 1 and that was all maybe it should read 2 lbs of sugar to 1 lb of H2O

5) a little on organic bee keeping on what they use to get ride of mites they must use more then just small cell frames?

6) some sites or from here on how to make some of the things people make

NasalSponge
08-20-2008, 03:35 PM
I just got a copy of "Natural Beekeeping" and must say this is an excellent book. It covers, in detail, pest and disease issues, especially v mites and all current treatments.

Scrapfe
08-21-2008, 10:37 PM
Water weighs 8 pounds per gallon. The local grocery store sells granulated sugar in 4 pound bags just to help beekeepers. A 1 by 1 mixture is TWO 4 pound (64 ounce) bags of sugar to one gallon water. Don’t use boiling water. If you use hot water let it cool to about your body temp before you give it to your bees not a drawn out process in Milwaukee during the winter if my memory serves me right. A 2 by 1 sugar water mixture is FOUR 4 pound bags of sugar to one gallon of water. A 1 by 2 mixture is ONE 4 pound bag of sugar to one gallon of water. If you will read the paper or go to the grocery with your wife you will often find sugar on sale. Recently I found granulated sugar in four pound bags for $1.29 each this is about .32 cents per pound. The 25 pound bags were $11.55 each or about 46 cents per pound. This was a savings of $32.00 on a 100 pound purchase.

Also considering the part of the country I live in the Alcohol Beverage Control Board may question you if you buy sugar in bigger sizes. The grocery stores use to have to keep records on who purchased sugar in 100 pound sacks. When people worked for a living or starved this was the moonshiners preferred size. Some times they carried a ton or more of sugar over a half a mile into the woods, one or two one hundred pound sacks at a time.

If you need powdered sugar for a mite test or to use as a medium to administer medicine or to make cake fond do this. Put regular granulated sugar in a DRY food processor. Pulse it until you have a fine powdered product, about 30 seconds. You will lose some volume when you do this, so if your “recipe” calls for a cup of powered sugar use more than a cup of granulated sugar to get the correct volume. It will still weigh the same however.

Walter T. Kelley said, “A pint is a pound the world around.” A gallon of water contains eight pints. A four pound bag of granulated sugar contains eight pints also.

Scrapfe
08-21-2008, 10:41 PM
oops my math was wrong

tecumseh
09-02-2008, 05:21 AM
reading material...

abc-xyz in any of it many additions. my wife especially likes for me to read from my old copy (early '70's edition) with it very dated prose. she has commentedthat this older books really does reflect how much beekeepers love their girls.

fatscher
09-05-2008, 07:39 PM
There are ABSOLUTELY NO ABSOLUTES when it comes to keeping bees.

As soon as someone tells you that bees always do this or always do that, or never do this or never do that, then DON'T believe them. There is absolutely NOTHING that bees will ALWAYS do. There are things that bees will MOST LIKELY do, but bees follow NO rules 100% of the time. Anyone who tells you they do, don't know bees very well. Things like beespace--MOST (99.8%) of the time bees regulate bee space, but NOT ALWAYS.

The other piece of advice is get Iddee's phone number. I don't know how many times I've called Iddee in a pinch. He lives in North Carolina, I live in Virginia, 40 miles west of Washington, DC. His phone # is plugged into my cell phone. He is a modern day G.M. Doolittle and does not mind one bit answering questions!

Locust n Honey
09-17-2008, 04:35 PM
Subscribe to the beekeeping magazines: American Bee Journal & Bee Culture

blaine
09-22-2008, 11:45 AM
Maintain perspective. calm and relaxed. easy does it with everything.

Bees are just lovely, fascinating bugs with a pointy end ( avoid ) and the other end that collects nectar and processes it into something wonderful... But bugs nonetheless. And they have been getting along and surviving without our meddling since creation.

You will have your successes and failures. Sometimes you get honey, other times not. You will make mistakes on occasion. And in spite of the screw ups and errors, somehow they survive and make increases for you. Other times, you do it all right, and for no discernible reason, the colony dies out depsite our best efforts.

Learn, relax, enjoy, and harvest honey when you are so blessed.

if you must stress and worry about something, may I suggest working on a solution to rid us all of those nasty parasites that cause more financial loss and problems than all others.... NO, not mites. Politicains. :D

clgs
09-29-2008, 12:45 PM
Do find out how you respond to being stung - yes it will happen. Good to know if you're one to swell up big time before you're in a situation where you get multiple stings.

But it HURTS! Many of my mentors (very experienced keepers) urged me to "get used to it"..."handle the frames with bare hands so you don't squish bees"..."just get a veil, suits cost too much"...."stings are good for you".

I think they love pain. Perhaps after going through hives, they like to slam fingers in car doors. Not for me.

The money for the full suit was the best money I spent. I always zip into the suit and put on gloves, 20 seconds and presto chango. Haven't felt that intense pain of a sting since - so I love the girls once more.

fatscher
10-04-2008, 07:50 PM
But it HURTS! Many of my mentors (very experienced keepers) urged me to "get used to it"..."handle the frames with bare hands so you don't squish bees"..."just get a veil, suits cost too much"...."stings are good for you".

I think they love pain. Perhaps after going through hives, they like to slam fingers in car doors. Not for me.

You gotta do what's best for you. I choose not to wear gloves if I can help it. It is not a macho thing for me, it just makes me feel closer to the girls and closer to nature. The thrill and pleasure of having bees crawl over my hands far outweighs the pain of stings. It's common for me to get 5-10 stings a day when I visit my 8 hives and 4 nucs on a sunny Saturday like today. The more stings per week, I consider the better. It increases my resistance to the poison.

I can tell an aggressive hive right away, 50-100 bees pour out of a hive 10 seconds after you open a box. In that case I wear gloves, always. But when the nectar flow is going strong, I wear my veil with t-shirt, shorts, and sandals. Gentleness is VERY important to me, An aggressive hive results in a pinched queen, and she's replaced in an instant.

Do I slam doors on my fingers? NO, that HURTS!

WayneW
10-12-2008, 10:26 AM
From my point of view, there are many and varried things i'd have done differently starting out.

I started beekeeping blindly, mostly for the benefit(s) of pollenation for my garden (and the neighborhoods as well). I thought it was a matter of "buy bees, equipment, woodenware, and VIOLA!!!! You're a beekeeper. That was a huge misconception on my behalf!!!:cry:

As i "restart" my adventure, i have to say READING is key (i didnt see that mentioned yet :D). There is certainly no shortage of books and informational material available, I'd bet many of the senior keepers on this site wish they had as much information available to them when started.

If making a 50$ or so book purchase is out of budget to start with, then a simple googling of the phrase "beekeeping pdf" (http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=&q=beekeeping+pdf) will net enough results for a great beginning for free.

As for a mentor, i wish i had contacted one ahead of my experience, rather than at a point where my bees are in trouble. There is no written word that can fill the void of "experience".

Other resources would be things like the Apiology and Apiculture online course offered by the University of Deleware (i am currently attending it myself).

Charlotte
11-06-2008, 06:35 PM
Hello-
Just gotta say along with everyone else READ. I am new to this too, and I have read a ton, and still am. Your local library can be your best friend. I personally bought a couple books, the rest I borrowed from the library. There really is a lot out there! I photocopy some stuff & highlight for reference. Saves a lot of $$$ to use your FREE local resources!

Good Luck!

sylus p
12-30-2008, 10:47 AM
Smoker - always
Veil - sometimes
gloves - almost never

I personally don't like it when they get in my pants....

bluegrass
01-16-2009, 04:23 PM
There is a lot of good information on here about getting started with beekeeping. For the younger people who are interested in starting, but don't have extra money for the initial setup there is a youth loan program through Farm Service Administration (FSA). It is a great Government program. You have develop a business plan and be a member of 4H or FFA.

This is how I got started. I was 13 and had to join 4H to qualify for the loan, but I barrowed $1500.00. It took me a lot of summers to pay it back, but the up side was that when I turned 18 and wanted to finance my first car I had a credit history and did not have to have a co-signer.

It taught me financial responsibility and the basics of business managment. I would encourage any youth who is interested in getting into beekeeping or any other agricultural project to this program.

Here is a link: http://www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=paca&topic=you

Mountain Gold
01-31-2009, 09:17 PM
I've been keeping bees for about 5 years now and a lurker on this forum for about 3.
Along with the all the reading of various books the search function on this forum has been one of the most useful tools for me.
Thank you all for the excellent insight over the last few years. I've never had a real mentor beekeeper and you've been invaluable in my search for beekeeping knowledge.

chillardbee
02-16-2009, 09:00 AM
Focus: What needs to be considered before taking the first step.

I would think the first is your physical abilities since supers can get very heavy, others would be where you live (rural, ect). I'd talk to local beeks and attend some bee club meetings as well. Read up on the subjects "begginers" "hive managment" and " activities in the hive" chances are that your state or provincial department of agriculture will have pamphlets for beeks new to beekeeping. If after that you feel your up for the challenge (and a challenge it is) then it's on to the next step of aquiring the supplies.

even though it is a challenge the rewards of keeping bees are well worth it.

marty_rk
03-06-2009, 04:06 PM
After I read, what should I do??

honeyshack
03-08-2009, 08:37 AM
I've read all the posts, very good information for learning. One thing is forgotten. Well two maybe.
1. a business plan.
a) is your goal to always be a 1-2 or 10 hive farm?
b) is this your way of starting out getting the feel and then go "whole hog" life style change
c) figure your costs. Start up, capital cost, day to day expensed like feed and treatments, repair costs on hives, on extraction
d) cost per hive then the price paid for honey
e) if your goal is to sell "farm gate" then your cost for packaging and bottling

Know where your $ go. At the end of the season you might see and increase in the bank, but what did it cost to get that increase?

Beeslave
03-08-2009, 04:08 PM
After I read, what should I do??
Acquire equipment, buy bees, install them and be ready to learn what the books can't show you(find a local successful mentor). An unsuccessful mentor can show you what not to do! Good luck. No matter how book smart you get "hands on experience" is the best.

Walt McBride
03-22-2009, 08:39 PM
West Coast and Western U.S. beekeeping is slightly different than most books portray as they seem to be written for the Eastern beekeeping operations.
If you are interested in the West or California Beekeeping operations there was a paper back book published in 1971 and revised 1987 by the University of California. It is now out of print.
These two booklets may be downloaded free from the Santa Clara Valley Beekeepers Guild.

URL: beeguild.org
Click on left hand coulomb "Books"
When screen opens read text and scroll down to: (Download) Fundamentals of California Beekeeping as a 2.7 megabyte PDF and or Beekeeping in California as a 1.9 megabyte PDF.
Walt

wcubed
07-25-2009, 01:08 AM
Always the maverick, my views differ from most of the above.
Yes, it's a good idea to read a beginners book, like First Lessons to become familiar with the unique jargon of beekeeping. (I didn't - didn't know they existed) When I bought a copy after a few years of winging it, to see what it contained, was disappointed. It's not perfect. I remember a picture of a new beek, in a new suit, standing beside a new hive and the caption implied that swarming was prevented because he had foundation in place. Not true.

My recommendation is seek out a local beekeeper and ask to buy an established hive or two to pollinate your garden. Plainly identify your ignorance of beekeeping, and watch his eyes light up. Ah, here is a know -nothing that I can teach in my way. Built in mentor. Take everything he tells you with a grain of salt. But he is likely to sell his hives to you at a price that would compete favorably with all new - unassembled. It might be a little shabby, but it is functional and contains a live colony. You are up and running on day one. Learn as you go. Speeds up learning process.

Walt

Brenda333
05-10-2010, 07:12 PM
You might want to get an overview of some of the alternative hives besides just the Langstroth: horizontal top-bar, Warre, dodecahedron. We've recently posted an overview of all three alternatives at the Micro Eco-Farming Center. (http://www.microecofarming.com/html/natural-beekeeping/natural-beekeeping.htm)

bigbearomaha
05-29-2010, 05:47 AM
The advice in here is right on track in my opinion.

1) learn all you can about honey bee biology and behavior. This starts with reading the many good books and sources listed in previous posts.

2) Find out if keeping bees is really for you. spend time with someone who has bees and see if you can get over your fears, see if you are allergic, gain some familiarity with bees before getting your own.

3) Know what you want to get out of working with bees. Is it to be a hobby, for the relaxation and health benefits of raw honey and the experience in general? Do you plan to sell honey and/or wax products? Is it a path to a full time income as honeyshack hopes? Knowing what you expect to get out of the experience before you get into it. It will help you prepare better for the methods and equipment you will need.

4) Be prepared to make mistakes. Bees are tougher than you think and will handle some mistakes. They will also contribute heavily to letting you know when you have made a mistake. Be Prepared to be stung. Accept it, own it, get used to the idea. once you accept that idea and are mentally prepared, you will find you can be more relaxed and calm thus better able to handle bees without rushing and being shaky, clumsy, etc... which also helps to keep the bees calm.

5) Respect the bees. These are living, breathing creatures trying to make their way in this world just as you and I are. Appreciate that these are creatures that we can collaborate with and that will tolerate being worked with as we do so that it comes out in a win/win for all involved. pollination happens, honey is made, wax is made, bees have a cared for environment to build healthy populations, the list goes on. This happens best when we have respect.

Big Bear

Ducks
09-06-2010, 12:20 PM
read and study a bit... read some more. one of the real changes in my lifetime is information is so much more at your finger tips than when I started beekeeping.

find an individual beekeeper or club and do.. get into a hive, build some equipment. try to implement at least part of what you learned.

and yep always smile (enjoy)... the girls are easier to sneak up on when you smile.

You people sound so much like myself.. I read until my eyes bleed then get back to reading,, then I dont show what I have learned but thats when my ears start to work,, I listen,, much like life isnt it :applause:
A man once told me ,, a person can know for sure how smart I am when I start talking.

bonterra bees
09-08-2010, 10:09 AM
Having had OBSERVATION HIVES all my life I can’t resist saying: there is a whole new level of understanding and education to be gained when you can watch them any time in any weather, for as long as you like. You can’t think like a bee but you can watch them think.
There is so much you can’t get just popping the top for a short, pressured time in good weather and disrupting the colony of an outdoor hive. With your Observation Hive you get things like; hearing conflicting Queens, sing and battle it out; seeing a new little girl chew her way out of her cell and rub herself off and begin her duties; following a forager bringing in pollen to the colony and find a cell and deposit it and another worker come and pack it in; a respect for their body abilities; legs, wings tongues; this and endless more.
And a respect for the selflessness of the individuals of colony and getting to know each as hard working individuals and (oops) friends.
I highly recommend an Observation hive as a priority in anyone’s Bee Education, weather you’re a commercial beekeeper or just starting out. Build one of your own or buy one.
See ours at: www.bonterrabees.com
Mark

Kendal
04-14-2011, 09:34 PM
I first read about bees because I wanted to find out if I could do it. I regret not having read first about keeping rabbits. I read Beekeeping: the Gentle Craft, but I don't remember the author. Later, I obtained a library of bee books that had been my dad's. Walter T. Kelley's book How to Keep Bees and Sell Honey should be a mainstay. Richard Taylor's The How-to-Do-it Book of Beekeeping is out of print now, but well worth paying the premium to purchase. I read ABC ...XYZ of Beekeeping till it was an old friend. These books were in my "throne room". I'd recommend them to anyone.

Michael Bush
04-15-2011, 05:53 AM
I agree with the observation hive. I learned more in a year of an observation hive than decades of having bees in hives. You get to see the detail of what they do all the time not just a snapshot of what they do while the lid is open.

The best beginners book I've see is "The Complete Idiot's Guide to Beekeeping". Hate the title. Love the book.

james121
03-01-2012, 03:30 PM
I see how an observation hive can be very educational for someone that does not have the knowledge of beekeeping, but are the bees able to get in an out to collect the pollen? Also curious as to how the bees exist in an enclosure like an observation hive and if their life cycle is shortened because of it?

Mbeck
03-01-2012, 07:09 PM
"Focus: What needs to be considered before taking the first step."

My suggestion... Find a spot for them,get them home alive.
It's not as hard as you think and rarely as easy as some people would
lead you to belive. So far!!

throrope
03-01-2012, 07:28 PM
1. Order bees.
2. Tap http://bushfarms.com/bees.htm.
3. Assemble or build hive that suits personality and budget.
4. Buy suit, hive tool and SS smoker.
5. Put bees in hive and feed.
6. Enjoy bees.

In other words, jump in with both feet and learn as you go. Otherwise, paralysis by analysis will set in.

Michael Bush
06-19-2012, 07:14 PM
>Also curious as to how the bees exist in an enclosure like an observation hive and if their life cycle is shortened because of it?

A typical observation hive is free flying. It is not an enclosure, but a free flying colony with limited space and glass so you can observe them.

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesobservationhives.htm

virgiea68
10-22-2012, 09:26 AM
This is the thread that I keep on visiting because I had used many tips from here. Every time I forgot something or don't know what to do I open this thread and get some answers. Thank you very much every one.

GLOCK
11-13-2012, 04:30 PM
The first book i read before i got bees was KEEPING BEES by JOHN VIVIAN 1986 when i got to the part it talks about swarming i said guess i'm not doing that . Well 15 years later i orded 2 package bees in the mail that was 3 years ago for me and the best book i think to start with i'd go with BEEKEEPING FOR DUMMIES . The first year failed both hives died buy JAN. The nex year i bought 3 nucs and i had read many book buy June and then them hives made it thought winter and now i have 15 hives{ made splits/queens/hived 8 swarms} going in to the winter and there strong saying this i think just jump in and see if ya like it you'll know buy year 2 if it's for you or not . I don't know if a class will realy teach you any thing you can't figur out on your own with books the internet and HANDS ON. I know i'll be a beekeeper the rest of my life after a year or two it clicks .
I know on the hobby side of it if you don't love you will not do it . And the swarm thing was crazy for me this past year can't wait till this spring to work on my SPM .A mentor i'd just like to know another beekeer to talk to .

Bee-Cuz
02-22-2013, 01:21 PM
What book(s) would you recommend?
My first book was FIRST LESSONS IN BEEKEEPING and I'd still recommend it.

My first book was Bee Keeping for Dummies, good book I would recommend it. I'm about to read The Backyard Beekeeper.

smacsek
03-08-2013, 05:03 PM
I haven't started beekeeping yet, but I am going to do it. I've signed up for two different classes, one at the local community college in May and another at an agricultural school in July, but I want to do some reading beforehand like everyone is suggesting, but what books??

Barry
03-08-2013, 05:10 PM
Two forums down will get you your answer.

https://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?275429-b2%29-Beginners-Beekeeping-Books

Solomon Parker
03-08-2013, 06:42 PM
Don't move too quickly. Give it some time. Let it sink in. No matter when you start getting the idea, it's too late for this year. Plan for next year.

julysun
03-08-2013, 07:52 PM
" it's too late for this year. Plan for next year" S. Parker. So true.
Steve Taber is my favorite author. Well fourth to M. Bush, BeeSource and www wandering. On second thought they are all favorites. Did I mention that guy that writes Scientific Beekeeping?
I restarted last year with three hives. They all three have survived my care and the spring is here! :applause:

DaveInTexas
08-31-2014, 07:38 PM
1. Is there a quality Youtube beekeeping info series that you would recommend?
2. The ABC-XYZs of Bee culture; which version is best?
3. Is Confessions of a Bad Beekeeper more humor....or does it have adequate fact?

Thanks to all who help the newbies.

Delta 21
04-08-2017, 06:50 AM
....then after you read, read, read.......

look in the mirror, YOU are the best source.

I can't tell you how many times that I have known the answer to my own questions, only to doubt myself, then not act on the answer I knew,

Yep! Trust your gut. But it was sure nice to have this forum to bounce ideas off of.

You gotta get around live bees, get stung and figure them out, but even reading about them for 2 years will not prepare you to physically handle 5000 flying stinging insects forced out of their habitat. The experience of actually doing it is the exhilarating part. The knowledge helps you make it an enjoyable experience.

I am doing top bar hives so I started out with these books, Tons of info.

32060
Thanks and a shout out to RuthiesBees for recomending The Thinking BeeKeeper, and a big THANKS to all the folks here that helped me not screw up too bad.

Bob8732
01-26-2018, 11:39 AM
There is something helpful and very interesting. Besides, I want to be awared of the latest news. Be well!

heybe
03-05-2018, 04:30 AM
Good read. I totally agree with all the points. It is a changing world out there.

Crooked River Keeper
03-06-2018, 08:47 PM
how has this gone? Insights? I am starting to think about keeping bees in that area and would appreciate the local insight.

Thank!

MimbresBees
03-15-2018, 11:04 AM
@ Crooked River Keeper
Matbe join SOBA (http://www.southernoregonbeekeepers.org/) and attend our meetings here in Southern Oregon.
shoot, attend the meeting without joing hey are open to the public anyways
come and learn, first business monday of the month, Our Speaker for April we have
Dr. Andony Melathopoulos from OSU Bee Labs: ” Doing the Multiplication: Expanding your Apiary the ‘Old School’ and the ‘Next Generation’ Way.”

We also have Beginners Bee School on April 7th 2018 this is a great time for all involved.

check out our website (www.southernoregonbeekeepers.org)
me - I'm the Club's Apiary Landscaper and Media guy.

I have several apiaries across the west from AZ CA and here in OR
nuff said

MatthewGreen
06-25-2018, 04:02 AM
Good read. I totally agree with all the points. It is a changing world out there.

Really great reading material! I completely agree with you!)

Gray Goose
05-09-2019, 01:38 PM
Do find out how you respond to being stung - yes it will happen. Good to know if you're one to swell up big time before you're in a situation where you get multiple stings.

But it HURTS! Many of my mentors (very experienced keepers) urged me to "get used to it"..."handle the frames with bare hands so you don't squish bees"..."just get a veil, suits cost too much"...."stings are good for you".

I think they love pain. Perhaps after going through hives, they like to slam fingers in car doors. Not for me.
.

Actually I do enjoy getting Stung, the fire slowly going up you arm or leg, the feel of fire in the vein. I can hardly wait till spring sometimes.
The venom really is good for some ailments, there is a Whole group of Apitherapy aficionados. Must be like skydiving, jumping out of a per factually good plane, feeling good....
GG

gnor
10-23-2019, 05:15 AM
All good advice up above. Spend a year learning all you can before you get bees. Read, read, read, join a club, work with another beek. There is some good stuff on YouTube but you need some background to separate the wheat from the chaff. Ask questions. Two beekeepers will give you 3 or 4 different answers.
Do some self searching:
Why do I want bees?
Where do I want to go with this?
Do I have the time and commitment to look after them?
You won't go far wrong if you read this first: https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/hivehealthbmps/
Don't worry about treatment free beekeeping. Concentrate on keeping your bees healthy and getting them through the Winter.
Make sure you have a nice chair in your bee yard. There is no place on Earth quite as satisfying to the soul as sitting in a bee loud glade and thinking about bees.