NATIONAL HONEY MARKET NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DIVISION
21 N. 1st AVENUE, SUITE 224
YAKIMA, WA 98902-2663




HONEY MARKET FOR THE MONTH OF AUGUST, 2000 IN VOLUMES OF 10,000 POUNDS OR GREATER.

PRICES PAID TO BEEKEEPERS FOR EXTRACTED, UNPROCESSED HONEY IN MAJOR PRODUCING STATES BY PACKERS, HANDLERS & OTHER LARGE USERS, CENTS PER POUND, F.O.B. OR DELIVERED NEARBY, CONTAINERS EXCHANGED OR RETURNED, PROMPT DELIVERY & PAYMENT UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

ARKANSAS
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 52¢
-
SOYBEAN, LIGHT AMBER, 46 - 48¢

CALIFORNIA
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 50¢
- BUCKWHEAT, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 46¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 47¢ (HIGHER PRICE FOR DELAYED PAYMENT)
- ORANGE, WHITE, 50 - 56¢
- SAGE, EXTRA WHITE, 58¢ - - - WHITE, 55¢

COLORADO
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 57¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 46¢

FLORIDA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 44¢
- GALLBERRY/SAW PALMETTO, LIGHT AMBER (NON-TABLE), 45¢
- ORANGE, WHITE, 52¢ - - - MEDIUM AMBER, 69 - 71¢

IDAHO
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45¢

ILLINOIS
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢

INDIANA
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45¢

IOWA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢

LOUISIANA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 46¢

MICHIGAN
- BLUEBERRY, MEDIUM AMBER, 65¢
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 52¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 68¢
- KNAPWEED, MEDIUM AMBER, 65¢

MINNESOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 53¢
- CLOVER/BASSWOOD, WHITE, 53¢

MISSISSIPPI
- WILDFLOWERS, AMBER, 48¢

MONTANA
- ALFALFA, LIGHT AMBER, 39¢ (SMALL LOT)
- CLOVER, WHITE, 54 - 56¢

NEBRASKA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢

NORTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 50 - 56¢ - - - EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 55¢

OREGON
- CLOVER, EXTRA WHITE, 58 - 61¢ - - - WHITE, 58 - 63¢
- MINT, AMBER, 35¢ (SMALL LOT)

SOUTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55 - 57¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 75¢
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 55¢

TEXAS
- CHINESE TALLOW, LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 48¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 44¢

WASHINGTON
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 53¢ - - - EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 42¢ (SMALL LOT)
- ALFALFA, LIGHT AMBER, 42¢ - - - AMBER, 36¢
- CANOLA, WHITE, 53¢ (SMALL LOT)
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 40¢ - - - AMBER, 39¢
- MINT, DARK AMBER, 32¢
- RASPBERRY, WHITE, 53¢

WISCONSIN
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢



PRICES PAID TO CANADIAN BEEKEEPERS FOR UNPROCESSED BULK HONEY BY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS IN U.S. CURRENCY, F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT, CONTAINERS INCLUDED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. DUTY AND CROSSING CHARGES EXTRA. CENTS PER POUND.

WINNEPEG
- CLOVER, WATER WHITE, 50¢ DELIVERED



PRICES PAID TO IMPORTERS FOR BULK HONEY, DUTY PAID, CONTAINERS INCLUDED, CENTS PER POUND EX-DOCK OR POINT OF ENTRY UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

EAST COAST. . . ARGENTINA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 50 - 57¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 48 - 49¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 49¢

CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 44 - 49¢



CALIFORNIA BEESWAX MARKET SITUATION --- AUGUST, 2000
(unbleached, raw beeswax, delivered to handlers's warehouse)

Trading is seasonally slow as producers were busy extracting their honey crop instead of rendering wax. They are also unhappy with current prices. On the other side, handlers are not in need of a lot of wax this time of year.

Light colored wax was being purchased or traded at $1.00 - 1.40 per pound with most handlers paying $1.30. The higher price was paid for wax that was brought in and traded for supplies or payment was delayed. There was too little dark wax purchased or traded during August to quote prices.


COLONY, HONEY PLANT & MARKET CONDITIONS DURING AUGUST

ALABAMA
Colonies were reported in fair to good condition. However moisture levels within the state have begun to improve but still considered a drought in the central part of the state. Honey production has been reduced due to temperatures ranging in the high 90s & 100s with very little moisture. Due to the drier than normal conditions some beekeepers report lots of supplemental feeding with com syrup and sugar water due to the lack of any kind of blooming bushes that contain nectar.

The flow of honey is very light. Prices for honey are generally unchanged.

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT
- (MD, PA, VA, WV)
Weather conditions in the area for August were cooler than normal with the feeling more like September than August. Temperatures were below normal (highs in the 80's, normal highs are in the 90's) with many scattered showers, although not as much precipitation as July saw. Honeybees are in good condition, although honey flows have remained sporadic due to the cooler temperatures and rainy and overcast days. They are foraging on an abundance of wildflowers and the start of goldenrod. Many beekeepers are actively entering honey in state and county fairs.

CALIFORNIA
Several high pressure systems dominated California's weather, producing mostly above normal temperatures. Daytime highs were in the 90's to low 100's across the Central Valley and inland portions of Southern California. Temperatures along the coast were in the 60's and 70's. The only break came from an occasional thunderstorm along the northern coast.

Despite the warm temperatures, the bees are reported to be in good condition as they are sitting in late summer locations at the edge of the desert or near rivers and along the coast. They did very well pollinating alfalfa and vegetable seed crops but the honey flow was pretty much done by the end of August. They are still bringing in pollen from tamarack, blue curls, greasewood, eucalyptus, bottlebrush, spikeweed and Brazilian pepper trees which will sustain the colonies for a while longer but some beekeepers were getting ready to add pollen supplements before winter. Most producers were finishing up extracting this years honey crop which is reported to be about the same to slightly less than last year. Others are leaving the honey on a little longer because robbing was reported from weaker colonies. Divides of stronger colonies will also be done shortly.

Honey packers report they are being offered plenty of local honey despite the low prices being paid. Some producers are putting their honey under loan but in some cases, the loan price is higher than what packers are paying. A few producers are only selling because they need the money right now. Packers also reported they are not being offered a lot of foreign honey right now.

Beekeeping supply companies noted their business is also slow right now.

COLORADO
Very warm temperatures have continued for most of the month of August for Colorado. Daytime highs were mostly in the mid 90s and the lows were in the mid 60s. The last ten days of the month has brought relief from the warmth and very dry conditions with the monsoon moisture flow for most of the state. Most of the state has been very dry, including the mountain areas.

Because of the very dry conditions throughout the state, many of the 30,000 beehives in the state have been damaged by hungry bears. The drought and early freeze dried up most of their traditional diet of berries and nuts. Bears have caused damage to many bee colonies in the mountain areas, and have worked their way to the plains in search of food. Many beekeepers have decided to harvest their honey crop about a month early to avoid any other losses from the bears.

FLORIDA
Thunderstorms dropped significant amounts of rain over some localities. Rainfall ranged from traces to almost four inches. Daytime highs were in the 90s, while nighttime lows were in the 70s.

This is the most dormant period of the year. The beekeepers are getting prepared for the fall flow. The activity is very slow. The bees that are out of the state are coming back within three to four weeks. Bees are making a little bit of honey from cabbage palm and other wild flowers.

Demand for Florida honey is very light. Prices are much lower.

GEORGIA
Colonies around the state were generally in good condition. Around the state in August various wildflowers were providing bees sufficient honey production to sustain their levels of store. There was a dirth of any significant nectars source. The sourwood flow in the north Georgia mountains produced good yields and has created favorable overwintering conditions. Fall flows from aster and goldenrod is on the verge of being noted at the first of September in the mountains of north Georgia.

IDAHO
The month of August was hot and dry throughout Idaho. Despite these conditions the colonies are in good to excellent condition producing a decent flow, which may be a little short when the final tally comes in. The bees are collecting both pollen and nectar from alfalfa, corn, wild flowers, sagebrush and rabbit brush.

The wholesale movement of honey has been slow, but steady. The demand is noted as low or weak and not as robust as last year.

ILLINOIS
Comparison temperatures for the month varied little overall from northern sections to southern sections. Most daylight temperatures ranged in the mid eighties over the state the first of the month. Mid-month, the southeastern part experienced high humidity and temperatures in the mid to upper nineties, with Fairfield reporting a high of ninety-nine degrees the 17th. The high temperatures and humidity were stressful on hives placed in open vegetable fields in central and southern sections of the state. Rainfall continued to be light in the northern section of the state while some area flooding was reported in some southern sections. Paris, in the east-central section, reported dry conditions while Robinson approximately forty miles south received more than ten inches in the same period.

The state fair at Springfield was well attended the first of the month. After declining numbers of beekeepers over the past several years, the State Beekeepers booth was busy answering inquiries. The Beekeepers association reported a growing interest in hobbyist beekeeping.

Honey quality for the year 2000 crop is expected to be very good. The extracted honey samples at this year's state fair show were very good quality. Moisture content was 16-17% and that is considered excellent.

Supplemental feeding is to begin earlier than normal this year due to prospects of a very poor fall flow. Goldenrod, the main fall floral source, has not developed well.

Honey and wax movement was good at farmers markets. Retail and bulk movement was slow. Honey prices were about unchanged with prices quoted in the 55-60 cent range. This continues to be lower than previous years.

INDIANA
Summer vegetable growers demand for honeybees for pollination created a shortage. The increase demand had many out of state bee being moved into the state. State honeybee inspectors found some cases of diseased honeybees that had been brought in from other states to pollinate pickle fields.

Extraction activities were moving quite rapidly. Beekeepers were harvesting a very high quality honey crop due to the frequent rainfall and moderate summer temperatures. The honey crop being extracted was estimated to be far short of last years' crop. Southern sections reported beekeepers had an average crop of 75-90 pounds of honey per hive. Northern sections, which received less rainfall, honey extracted per hive was 30-50 pound. These early estimates, were only fair estimates. The frequency and amounts of rainfall has varied throughout the year 2000 crop season within a local area as well as statewide.

Beekeepers were treating colonies as extraction of honey was completed. The State Chief Apiary Inspector has been encouraged by the beekeepers treatment program to control mites. The identifying of areas where the small hive beetles are present has also become a problem for the state beekeepers.

Floral sources bees had been working were various vegetable bloom, with cucumber and pickle the major vegetable crops. It was noted, because of the frequency of rainfall, clover bloom has been drastically less than normal. Roadside wild flowers of Queen Ann's Lace, bachelor buttons, and dandelions were in adequate supply.

Demand for honey was very good, as many farmers markets throughout the state featured locally collected honey. Bulk honey sales were slow and prices remained about unchanged .The retail level sales were reported slow.

KENTUCKY
Colonies were reported in fair to good condition. Some beekeepers are hoping that the drought is over as they are now having cooler temperatures with adequate rainfall; although earlier this month temperature ranged in the high 90s with some days 100 degrees and above. A few beekeepers report some Apistan resistance from the bees but generally most hives predominately in good condition.

The flow of honey is moderate. Prices for honey are generally unchanged.

MICHIGAN & OHIO
Colonies around the state were in good condition. The month of August experienced about normal to normal temperatures for most of the month. The bees have fed on a number of sources including forage and floral sources. No supplemental feeding was noted in many areas due to the temperatures being about normal for the month.

By months end, most beekeepers had removed supers and extracted the summer flow.

Demand for honey was light.

MISSISSIPPI
Colonies around the state were generally in good condition. During the month of August precipitation was below normal amounts. In the southern portions of the state colonies gathered enough pollen and nectar from late summer wildflowers to sustain their levels of store. In the northern portion of the state colonies were sustaining themselves from nectar and pollen gathered from the soybean and cotton crops. A fall flow of nectar and pollen in the central and northern portions is expected in September from floral sources such as boneset, goldenrod, Spanish needle and aster. These expected flows will help buildup colonies reserves for colder months ahead.

MISSOURI & IOWA
August was generally dryer and hotter than normal, except for Central Missouri which received slightly above average rainfall. Beekeepers were busy adding supers and treating for mites before the fall honey flow. Bee populations in the hives for the peak honey flow were generally good. Nectar flow was reduced in Southeast Missouri and Northeast Arkansas by the hot weather which caused cotton and soybeans to shed blooms. Cotton fields were being defoliated the last week of August in the Missouri "Boothill". Honey yields of the early harvest appear about normal. Honey in Missouri was variable from wet to dry depending on location of hives. Much of the honey from the Missouri River Valley need drying. Honey from Iowa was generally dry with good color and quality.

MONTANA
Extremely hot and dry conditions continued across the entire state during the first three weeks of August. They only area to receive any significant moisture was the northeast corner but the storms also included hail and high winds. Daytime highs were frequently in the mid-90's to low 100's. A small amount of relief came the very end of the month when light rain, higher humidity and cooler temperatures were reported across the state. The break in the weather was pretty much too little, too late for most of the state as 27 fires, covering over 600,000 acres were not yet contained the end of the month. The storms that brought the rain sometimes brought lightning which could cause additional fires.

Despite the weather, the bees are reported to be in fairly good condition, especially those sitting near irrigated crops such as alfalfa. Extracting of this years honey crop was still going on the end of the month but production is reported to be down as much as 30% of normal. Some producers had already sold their bees as soon as the honey was extracted. A shortage of water will be a concern for some time as topsoil moisture was still 67% very short.

NEVADA
Good honey sales were reported in August at county fairs and the coming month of September has even more fairs coming up. Beekeepers with fewer hives reported good honey sales at flea and farmers markets on the California boarder. Weather has been dry and warm, but starting to see some seasonal monsoon activity. One of the commercial beekeepers is in California for the yellow star thistle bloom.

The honey flow has been very good and hives are at the peak of health. Floral sources this last month included the last of the annual yard flowers, alfalfa and clover. Rabbit brush should start blooming this next month.

NEW ENGLAND
Weather for August continued to be cool and wet, except for a few days' temperatures did not climb out of the 70s, with precipitation remaining above average. Beekeepers are reporting very slow production and a below average honey crop, with many beekeepers not harvesting at all.

Beekeepers are now starting to treat their colonies for mites, and problems continued for some beekeepers with reports of large infestations of Varroa and Tracheal mites in certain areas of central New England.

Demand for New England honey is good for the limited supplies available. Good retail sales were reported at farm stands and local stores.

NEW YORK
The colonies around the state were in generally good condition. The beekeepers reported the bees have had adequate stores with no supplemental feeding necessary. The bees are getting pollen and nectar from goldenrod and purple loose strife. They have also been working clover and alfalfa. The weather during the month of August had cooler than normal temperatures.

OREGON
For most of August, temperatures were above normal with a couple of exceptions along the coast. Willamette Valley temperatures ranged from 2-8 degrees above normal while Eastern Oregon reported daytime highs in the mid 90's to low 100's which is as much as 12 degrees above normal. The only break came around the middle of the month when daytime highs dropped into the 80's. Along the coast, conditions were cool but very little rain was reported. For the year, about two-thirds of the state still had below normal rainfall with some areas close to 50% short. By the end of August, topsoil moisture was 50-75% short.

Bees are reported to be in very good condition as they finished up vegetable seed pollination. They were then able to forage on wild carrot and thistles. Many commercial beekeepers finished up extracting their honey crop which is reported to be slightly below last year but the quality of the honey is very good. Mite treatments were put in as soon as the honey was off, which is a little earlier than normal, and extra feed was also added when needed.

Very few losses were noted from pesticides except when the bees were set near other crops such as alfalfa and Christmas trees, which needed a little extra spray this year because of the hot, dry weather.

TENNESSEE
Temperatures ranged from the high 90s to the high 70s, with lots of humidity and moderate rainfall. Most beekeepers report their bees in fair to good conditions. Beekeepers report a drought in different areas of the state due to the lower than normal rainfall. Beekeepers report a higher than normal rate of bees swarming due to the heat.

The flow of honey is fairly light to moderate. Honey prices are generally unchanged.

UTAH
It has been hot and dry the entire summer in Utah. The honey market is dismal. Availability of irrigation water in some instances has reduced or stopped hay production, and has left the bees with even less floral sources and moisture. The current floral sources are clover and alfalfa.

WASHINGTON
Through the 18th, conditions across the entire state were hot and dry. Daytime highs west of the Cascades were in the 80's or as much as 6 degrees above normal, while the eastern half of the state was frequently in the upper 90's to low 100's. Little to no rain was reported. Around the 19th, a cooling trend occurred in Western Washington bringing relief from the heat and a few rainshowers, which ended 21 days without any precipitation. The same time, Eastern Washington remained dry but temperatures dropped into the 80's. Conditions heated up again until the end of August when highs in the 80's in the west and 90's in the east. Topsoil moisture the end of the month was still 50% short but irrigation water was still adequate in most areas.

Bees that stayed in the state during August are reported to be in good condition as they were sitting near rivers and irrigated crops as many of the other sources dried up. A good honey crop was being extracted from mint and alfalfa. Some bees were left here to use for increases later. Many commercial beekeepers moved their bees out of the state this summer because of previous problems with losses from sprays. Bees in North and South Dakota are also reported to be in fairly good condition but spotty rain back there dictated what kind of a honey crop they will have. Some of the bees will be left there until October when they are moved to California holding yards.

WISCONSIN
Beekeepers reported an overall slowing of the honey flow last month. The poor pollen collection was blamed on frequent rains and some high winds in southern sections. Northern sections had some hail damage the first of the month with some areas receiving golf size hail and some areas receiving approximately three inches of rainfall. Temperatures for the month were generally four to six degrees below the normal over most of the state.

By the last of the month, many beekeepers had pulled hives out of the vegetable fields. Honeybees seemed to be in good condition however, as beekeepers stepped up extraction activity. The quality of honey was reported better than last year. Beekeepers were encouraged to treat hives after removing supers and harvesting honey. General concern expressed by beekeepers centered on continued mite problems and the mite's resistance to treatment.

Honey demand seasonally picked up as summer festivals were well attended. Wax and candle demand was also reported good. Commercial demand continued to be slow with little bulk movement reported.