NATIONAL HONEY MARKET NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DIVISION
21 N. 1st AVENUE, SUITE 224
YAKIMA, WA 98902-2663




HONEY MARKET FOR THE MONTH OF JULY, 2000 IN VOLUMES OF 10,000 POUNDS OR GREATER.

PRICES PAID TO BEEKEEPERS FOR EXTRACTED, UNPROCESSED HONEY IN MAJOR PRODUCING STATES BY PACKERS, HANDLERS & OTHER LARGE USERS, CENTS PER POUND, F.O.B. OR DELIVERED NEARBY, CONTAlNERS EXCHANGED OR RETURNED, PROMPT DELIVERY & PAYMENT UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

ARKANSAS
- CLOVER, WHITE, 53¢
-
SOYBEAN, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 48¢

CALIFORNIA
- - - NEW CROP - - -
- ALFALFA/COTTON, LIGHT AMBER, 49¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 50¢

COLORADO
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 56¢

FLORIDA
- - - NEW CROP - - -
- BRAZILIAN PEPPER, LIGHT AMBER, 45¢
- MANGROVE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 53¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 46¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 46¢
- ORANGE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 60¢ (PREVIOUS COMMITMENT)
- ORANGE, MEDIUM AMBER, 69¢
- ORANGE/SAW PALMETTO, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 52¢
- SAW PALMETTO, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 53 - 60¢ (HIGHER PRICES FOR PREVIOUS COMMITMENTS OR SMALL LOTS)
- SAW PALMETTO, LIGHT AMBER, 47¢
- TUPELO, WATER WHITE, $1.30
- WILDFLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 47¢
- CUT COMB, $1.35

IDAHO
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 50¢
- MINT, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 50¢ - - - AMBER, 40¢

ILLINOIS
- CLOVER, WHITE, 57¢

LOUISIANA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 46¢

MICHIGAN
- CLOVER, WHITE, 54¢
- BLUEBERRY, MEDIUM AMBER, 65¢
- FLORAL UNKNOWN, LIGHT AMBER, 49.50 - 52¢
- KNAPWEED, MEDIUM AMBER, 65¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, WHITE, 51¢

MINNESOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 63¢

MONTANA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55¢ - - - EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 55¢
- FLORAL UNKNOWN, WHITE, 58¢

NEW YORK
- CLOVER, LIGHT AMBER, 47¢

NORTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55¢
- FLORAL UNKNOWN, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 58¢

OHIO
- CLOVER, WHITE, 53¢

SOUTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 53 - 65¢ (HIGHER PRICE - PREVIOUS COMMITMENT)
- SUNFLOWER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 55¢

WASHINGTON
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 51¢
- MUSTARD, WHITE, 53¢ (SMALL LOT)
- SNOWBERRY, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 51¢

WISCONSIN
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢

WYOMING
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 51¢




PRICES PAID TO CANADIAN BEEKEEPERS FOR UNPROCESSED BULK HONEY BY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS IN U.S. CURRENCY, F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT, CONTAINERS INCLUDED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. DUTY AND CROSSING CHARGES EXTRA. CENTS PER POUND.

ALBERTA
- CLOVER, WATER WHITE, 55 - 56¢ DELIVERED - - - LIGHT AMBER, 48¢



PRICES PAID TO IMPORTERS FOR BULK HONEY, DUTY PAID, CONTAINERS INCLUDED, CENTS PER POUND EX-DOCK OR POINT OF ENTRY UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

EAST COAST. . . ARGENTINA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA WHITE, 49¢ - - - WHITE, 49 - 54¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 49 - 51¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 47 - 49¢
- WILDFLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 48¢

AUSTRALIA
- ORANGE, WHITE, 65¢

CHINA
- WILDFLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 44¢

MEXICO
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 50¢

WEST COAST. . . CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, WHITE, 52¢



CALIFORNIA BEESWAX MARKET SITUATION --- JULY, 2000
(unbleached, raw beeswax, delivered to handlers's warehouse)

Handlers are still not actively seeking any large lots of wax as sales of finished products remains stagnant. Producers were also busy extracting their current honey crop so they weren't offering much. Prices are also very low.

Light colored wax was being purchased or traded at $1.00 - 1.50 per pound with most handlers paying $1.30. The higher price was paid for wax that was brought in and traded for supplies. There was too little dark wax purchased or traded during July to quote prices.


COLONY, HONEY PLANT & MARKET CONDITIONS DURING JULY

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT
- (MD, PA, VA, WV)

July 2000 is making a name for itself as the wettest and coolest July in more than a decade. Temperatures have been approximately 10-15 degrees below normal and rainfall for the month has been recorded at 27 inches (as of the 28th). Honey production has been sporadic throughout the District with some areas reporting a good flow and other parts reporting flows below average. Area beekeepers are expressing disappointment in the flows from tulip poplar and black locust. The cool, damp weather is to blame. Bees are generally in good health. There were occasional disease problems reported in June, however, most beekeepers report these problems have decreased. Bees are foraging on sweet clover, knapweed and various wildflowers.

Officials with Virginia Tech were successful in eliminating an isolated swarm of Africanized honey bees in Low Moor, VA in early July after they attacked a goat. USDA officials confirmed they were the Africanized honey bees. VA Tech has set up monitoring sites near the area. Next week is the Eastern Apiculture Society Beekeeping Conference in Saulisbury, MD. Many activities and presentations are planned for this five-day event.

CALIFORNIA

Weather conditions were unsettled across the state the first ten days of July. Several weather disturbances triggered widespread thunderstorms in Northem California. Over and inch of rain fell during one storm on July 5th. Below normal temperatures were also reported during the period. By the middle of the month, high pressure systems brought warmer than normal temperatures throughout the state but there were still frequent thunderstorms in the Sierra Nevada mountains. Dry conditions and warm temperatures remained through the end of the month except the coastal regions which saw occasional low clouds and fog.

The last few days of July, wildfires began breaking out just north of Los Angeles in the Sequoia National Forest. By the 31st, over 63,000 acres, including several homes, were destroyed with no containment expected any time soon.

The bees are reported to be in good condition but the hot weather sometimes made them hard to work. Most hives were still setting around or in irrigated crops of cotton, alfalfa and alfalfa seed or in fields such as sage where they had access to water. They did not make a lot of honey because they tended to shut down in the afternoon heat but a few producers expect to get more honey than last year. Some forage crops were beginning to dry up. In some cases, supers were being removed and extracting had started, which is two weeks later than last year.

Packers report they are currently being offered more honey than they need even though prices are low. Because sales of finished products are so unpredictable, they are not contracting too far ahead.

COLORADO
The month of July has been extremely hot for most of the state. The Denver area had 17 continuous days of highs in the mid 90s and a few days over 100 degrees. Moisture has been very limited and spotty, with most of the state below normal in precipitation for the month. Fire danger has been very high throughout the state. Numerous fires around the state, caused primarily by lightning, have caused extensive damages. Mesa Verde National Park in southwest Colorado has burned more then 24,000 acres as of this date.

Bee colonies have been working the alfalfa, clover, and other wild flowers, but the dry conditions have greatly limited the bloom, except those on irrigated land. The honey flow is expected to be below normal this season because of these conditions.

FLORIDA
Scattered showers & thunderstorms around the State dropped varying amounts of rain. Dry conditions continued across most of the northern Peninsula & western Panhandle. Daytime highs were in the 90s, with Pensacola & Tallahassee reaching 102.

The activity is very slow. Most of the bees are out of the State. Bees are making a little bit of honey. The cabbage palm has bloomed a lot this year. This nectar keeps the bees in good shape, but the flow is very thin. Due to dry conditions, the Chinese Tallow crop in north Florida was over too soon and did not do well. Also, the cotton was planted late this year and it is now blooming.

Demand for Florida honey is stagnant with very low prices.

IDAHO

The last two weeks of July have been exceptionally warm and dry across the state. Most beekeepers have starting pulling supers off of a really good honey flow. Everyone hopes the honey flow continues for the next six weeks, despite the dry conditions. It has been noted that in the past some of the dryer years have produced some really good honey. Bees have been feeding off irrigated fields of seed alfalfa and sweet clover. The dry land farming areas have had little or no rain this last month and the next bloom on the hay fields may be sparse.

ILLINOIS
Temperatures for the month varied from northern sections to southern sections. The first of the month, temperatures were generally in the eighties north and low nineties south. Rainfall for the month was slightly over two inches in the northern section while precipitation varied from five inches to over ten inches in the other regions of the state. The last of the month, most areas had temperatures near the normal with highs in the mid-eighties to low nineties with high humidity but northern sections had below normal temperatures. Chicago's O'Hare weather station set a record low of 53 degrees on the 24th. Due to cooler than normal temperatures and limited rainfall some, beekeeper's in northern section were disappointed with the summer honey flow. Bees were working dandelion, cornflower bloom, butterfly bush, red clover, and assorted wild flowers.

INDIANA
Beekeeper's summer activities were moving quite rapidly. Most colonies continued to build up rapidly. Early in the month frequent rains and favorable temperatures increased the supply of floral sources. Bees were working vegetable bloom, wild flowers of Queen Ann's Lace, bachelor buttons, dandelions & Cornflower. Beekeepers in the south part of the state reported they had been busy adding supers as honey flow was heavier than normal. Northern sections received less rainfall so honey flow was much less. Treated honeybees were reported in very good condition. Reports of mite problems were less this summer than in prior years.

Some early harvest had begun in southern sections and yields were considered to be normal for the month of July.

Demand for honey was slow and prices remained about unchanged on bulk as well as the retail level.

MISSOURI & IOWA
Weather during July was warmer than normal the first two weeks then about an average of 10 degrees below normal the last half of the month. Precipitation was slightly below normal for July with the total for the year in most of Missouri slightly above normal and most of Iowa slightly below normal. In the extreme northwest corner of Missouri, the drought index still shows abnormally dry and the western counties of Iowa show abnormally dry to first stage drought. Honey yields range from below average to way above average in a few locations in Iowa.

In Southeast Missouri and Northeast Arkansas, bees finished pollination of melons and cucumbers. The honey flow from cotton and soybeans will most likely by low due to a late start and a quick shut down because of the dry weather early in the season. In Northern Missouri and Iowa bees were working soybeans, white Dutch & white sweet clover and alfalfa. Some cotton needed spraying for boll weevils. Some comb honey was pulled for county and state fairs coming during August. Quality of honey produced to date looks good. The state Apiarist in Iowa was recommending that beekeepers harvest the crop and treat for mites prior the nectar flow from fall flowers. Beekeepers are getting the honey houses ready for harvest of the crop from August through October.

MONTANA
Severe thunderstorms and hot, dry conditions dominated the state throughout the month. The storms occasionally dropped large amounts of precipitation but daytime highs in the mid 90's to low 100's dried everything up as fast as it came down. The storms also brought lighting that touched off as much as 6 fires that destroyed 44,000 acres and several homes. Topsoil moisture was 54% very short as reservoirs started to dry up and irrigation water was cut off in some it's areas.

The bees are reported to be in good condition if they are setting in irrigated fields that still had water. Beekeepers are getting a crop from canola seed and alfalfa. Some have starting extracting.

NEVADA
Most beekeepers have started extracting honey in July and found this crop to have excellent quality with good flavor. Also, making a real nice comb honey this year. Weather has been hot and dry in Nevada too, but some beekeepers can remember taking off some real good honey in drought years. Floral sources for the bees this month have included thistle, milkweed, clover and alfalfa.

One of the commercial beekeepers is taking his bees back to the grasslands of southern California to catch the star thistle bloom, which gives a nice light viartial honey. This season there has been an increased demand for pollination on the seed alfalfa fields in Nevada, as the leaf cutter bees have not been performing up to expectations.

Farmers Markets are gaining in popularity with many Utah beekeepers, offering them another way to market their honey with a better return.

NEW ENGLAND
Weather for July continued to be unseasonably cool and wet. Precipitation in some areas of central and northern New England reached 10 inches. Temperatures in these areas ranged from mid 70s to mid 80s for the first two weeks of July and cooler temperatures were reported for the second two weeks.

Nectar and pollen have been severely retarded in these areas with beekeepers harvesting little or no surplus honey. Southern New England has faired better with beekeepers reporting they are still adding supers and harvesting surplus honey.

Some small outbreaks of Varroa mites were reported, these colony's are being medicated early to try to keep them up to strength for the coming winter.

OREGON
Unlike other areas of the northwest, the first half of July was fairly cool across the state with daytime highs as much as 12 degrees below normal. Summer retuned the middle of July when temperatures rose 5 degrees above normal along the coast and as much as eleven degrees in the east. Precipitation was light and usually came from an occasional thunderstorm. For the year, 2/3 of the state has received below normal rainfall with some areas reporting topsoil moisture as much as 75% short.

The bees are looking very good for this time of year. They occasionally shutdown when temperatures climbed into the 90's but even some non-irrigated crops such as red clover, had a good long honey flow during the month. Others showed good build-up during the cranberry bloom. Extraction was just starting, with a good crop expected.

UTAH
Hot and dry weather this month with record highs being set regularly. Honey flow is fairly good for most areas of Utah. Possibility of an early cut off of irrigation water due to drought situations this year may effect the over all length of the honey flow this season. Floral sources are primarily from irrigated fields of clover and alfalfa.

Richard Adee, head of the American Honey Producers Association, said that cheap honey from Argentina and China is causing financial disaster for the U.S. honey industry. Richard said the average price for domestic honey was 93 cents a pound in 1997, but fell to 65 cents in 1998 and 60 cents last year. He said import quotas and pricing requirements on Chinese honey will expire Wednesday, August 16th, and that new pricing requirements on China and Argentina will be filed with the International Trade Commission, charging the two nations with dumping honey on the U.S. market and undercutting U.S. prices. (Associated Press August 1, 2000)

WASHINGTON
Weather conditions in Western Washington alternated between warm and dry to cool and rainy during July. Just as growers became concerned about dry conditions, a couple of systems would move into the state bringing rain and cooler temperatures. Daytime highs would jump into the upper 80's then drop back down to the 70's. Vancouver was the hot spot again when they had daytime highs in the low 90's.

Eastern Washington was mostly hot and dry throughout the month with daytime highs in the 90's to low 100's. The only rain came from an occasional thunderstorm, which also started several range and forest fires. They were in the Tri-Cities area the first of July, in Klickitat County near the Columbia River and still going the end of the month, a large fire in Okanogan County. A burn-ban was in effect across Eastern Washington. Despite the heat, irrigation water supplies ended the month at 99% adequate. Clover and alfalfa were the main nectar sources as the bees are still in very good condition. Most are setting near irrigated crops or close to rivers and ponds.

Despite an occasional severe weather, North and South Dakota are very dry for the second year in a row. 50% of the state is reporting short or very short topsoil moisture. Because of the dry conditions, some beekeepers decided not to take their bees there this summer.

WISCONSIN
Beekeepers reported an overall good honey flow during July. The honey flow had been slowed because of the frequent rains experienced over most of the state. By mid-month, bees were bringing in heavy amounts of pollen from vegetable crops. Nectar gathering activity also picked up sharply. Honeybees seemed to be in good condition with little new mite problems reported. Mid-month, beekeepers had their summer meeting where much discussion centered on continued mite problems, mites resistance to treatment, and honey production concerns.

Some Wisconsin honey production statistics for the last two years are noteworthy. The honey crop of 1999 was down 26% from 1998. Average yield per colony was down sixteen pounds and total value of the crop was down 30%. The drop in value of the overall 1999 crop spotlights two important factors. The average price of honey was four cents per pound less than the 1998 crop. The number of hives dropped by approximately 9,000 in 1999. In 1999 the state slipped to ninth place from seventh in national honey production.

Honey movement was reported slow.