NATIONAL HONEY MARKET NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DIVISION
21 N. 1st AVENUE, SUITE 224
YAKIMA, WA 98902-2663




HONEY MARKET FOR THE MONTH OF JUNE, 2000 IN VOLUMES OF 10,000 POUNDS OR GREATER.

PRICES PAID TO BEEKEEPERS FOR EXTRACTED, UNPROCESSED HONEY IN MAJOR PRODUCING STATES BY PACKERS, HANDLERS & OTHER LARGE USERS, CENTS PER POUND, F.O.B. OR DELIVERED NEARBY, CONTAlNERS EXCHANGED OR RETURNED, PROMPT DELIVERY & PAYMENT UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

ARKANSAS
-
SOYBEAN, LIGHT AMBER, 44¢

CALIFORNIA
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT & LIGHT AMBER, 48¢
- ORANGE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 50¢
- - - NEW CROP - - -
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT & LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 46¢
- ORANGE, EXTRA WHITE, 56¢ - - - WHITE, 55 - 62¢
- ORANGE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 47 - 48¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 46¢
- SAGE, WATER WHITE, 58¢ - - - WHITE, 55 - 57¢

FLORIDA
- - - NEW CROP - - -
- BRAZILIAN PEPPER, LIGHT AMBER, 48¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 46¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 47¢
- ORANGE, WHITE, 57¢ - - - EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 58 - 62¢
- TUPELO, WHITE, $1.30

LOUISIANA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 46¢

MICHIGAN
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 51¢
- FLORAL UNKNOWN, LIGHT AMBER, 51¢

MINNESOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 63¢

NEBRASKA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55 - 62¢

NORTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55¢
- SAFFLOWER, WHITE, 56¢

OREGON
- CLOVER, WHITE, 63¢

SOUTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, WATER WHITE, 59¢
- CLOVER, WHITE, 55 - 57¢ (SOME PREVIOUSLY COMMITTED WAS DELIVERED AT 58¢)

TEXAS
- - - NEW CROP - - -
- CHINESE TALLOW, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 50¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 46¢

WASHINGTON
- CLOVER, WHITE, 61¢
- SUNFLOWER, COLOR NOT REPORTED, 52¢

WISCONSIN
- CLOVER, WHITE, 57¢




PRICES PAID TO CANADIAN BEEKEEPERS FOR UNPROCESSED BULK HONEY BY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS IN U.S. CURRENCY, F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT, CONTAINERS INCLUDED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. DUTY AND CROSSING CHARGES EXTRA. CENTS PER POUND.

WINNIPEG
- CLOVER, WATER WHITE, 57¢ DELIVERED



PRICES PAID TO IMPORTERS FOR BULK HONEY, DUTY PAID, CONTAINERS INCLUDED, CENTS PER POUND EX-DOCK OR POINT OF ENTRY UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

EAST COAST. . . ARGENTINA
- MIXED FLOWERS (INCLUDING CLOVER), WHITE, 44 - 57¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45 - 51¢ (HIGHER PRICE PREVIOUSLY COMMITTED)
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 45¢

CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 48¢

WEST COAST. . . CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 53 - 43.50¢



CALIFORNIA BEESWAX MARKET SITUATION --- JUNE, 2000
(unbleached, raw beeswax, delivered to handlers's warehouse)

Very little wax was offered during June but handlers also didn't have very many orders for finished products. Most of what was brought in was traded for supplies or because the beekeeper needed money right now. Things are expected to pick up in a few weeks as orders were starting to come in, especially from candle companies.

Light colored wax was being purchased or traded at $1.30-1.50 per pound with most handlers paying $1.30. The higher price was paid for large lots of very clean wax. There was too little dark wax purchased or traded during June to quote prices.


COLONY, HONEY PLANT & MARKET CONDITIONS DURING JUNE

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT
- (MD, PA, VA, WV)
Honey production continues and bee activity has been generally good. June temperatures fluctuated between above normal hot days to below normal cool, damp days. The NASS reports soil moisture levels are above last year. Last year at this time the District soil moisture levels were short or very short. There were a few reports of limited supplies of nectar coming in caused by the numerous rain showers and thunderstorms, which have kept bee activity at a minimum in some areas. Bees are foraging on the heavy clover bloom, in addition to melons, cucurbits, wildflowers, and pasture crops. Sourwood bloom in the Southern Appalachian District has just begun and beekeepers are hoping for a good honey flow from this locally popular nectar source.

CALIFORNIA
Weather conditions were fairly normal the first half of June. The only exception was on the 8th when a low pressure trough led to much cooler than normal temperatures. Around the middle of the month, a heat wave resulted in more than three dozen daily-record highs. In addition, several all-time-record highs were set or tied from the 12-14th in the Bay area when San Francisco hit 103 degrees. They had topped 100 degrees only twelve times in the past 100 years. Elsewhere, Paso Robles recorded 115 degrees and Death Valley noted 126 degrees. Three days later, the heat began to edge eastward and temperatures began to dip slightly, but the northern half of the sate still had daily highs as much as 6 degrees above normal. By the end of June, temperatures had returned to near normal levels across the state.

The bees are reported to be in good condition but some areas could use a little rain. Beekeepers were busy moving their colonies into the alfalfa seed, melons, cotton and sunflowers. Some melon fields were treated for weeds and sprayed for aphids which kept beekeepers busy moving hives in and out.

An average crop is expected from most honey producing plants. The clover and misc. wildflowers did not have a good bloom because it became hot and dry in some areas. The buckwheat also dried up in a few places. In contrast, the rains came just at the right time to get an abundance of thistles. Some beekeepers were just getting ready to start extracting. A good set occurred in the almonds as growers were supporting the heavy tree limbs.

Packers reported being offered new crop orange honey but demand is still fairly slow. Others noted that producers are holding their honey because of low prices.

COLORADO
June continued with some record breaking temperatures for most of the month. Most areas across the state ranged from the the mid-80s to the mid-90s for daytime highs until the last week of the month. Some areas of southeastern Colorado reported highs in the mid-90s to low-100s. Nighttime lows ranged from the mid-40s for the mountains to low-50s in the plains. The southern part of the state continues to be below normal in precipitation for the year, but the last week of June did produce some thunderstorms for most parts of the state with .25 to 1" accumulations.

Lyle Johnston, a beekeeper from Rocky Ford, Colorado and vice president of the American Honey Producers Association, is helping spearhead a campaign to challenge cheap honey imports from Argentina and China that threaten domestic honey farmers. The industry group plans to file an anti-dumping petition with the U.S. International Trade Commission. At 50 to 55 cents per pound, most Colorado beekeepers can't turn a profit. Colorado-produced honey has fallen by nearly 50 percent since 1988, as have the number of producers, according to the Colorado Department of Agriculture. Honey production for last year was about 2 million pounds.

FLORIDA
Hot and mostly dry conditions continued the first part of the month. Abundant rain fell over the Peninsula with scattered storms also bringing relief to some dry areas. Most highs were in the 80s and 90s, while most lows were in the 60s and 70s.

The activity is very slow. Most of the bees that go out of the State have already been moved. There are no reports of a mangrove crop. The cabbage palm is the only crop available. Due to the rains, the thin flow that the bees get from the cabbage palm will not make a honey surplus. The citrus canker is beginning to impact the beekeepers. Bees are in good shape.

Demand for Florida honey is slow with lower prices.

GEORGIA
Colonies around the state were generally in good condition. During the month of June, weather conditions were not considered favorable enough to produce a surplus from floral sources for honey producers. Dry weather conditions were prevalent which affected overall honey production. Honey producers in the southern portions of the state worked off summer titi during early to mid June. There is currently a dirth of any significant pollen or nectar sources until the fall. During June, in the central and northern portions of the state, bees worked off sumac in the mid to late part of the month. Sourwood was being worked at the end of June in the northern mountain area and was expected to peak during July.

IDAHO
A windy, generally warm June, hasn't slowed the bees down to much. The honey flow started pretty much on schedule with some beekeepers expecting to start extraction after the 4th of July. Floral sources include alfalfa, sweet clover and various weeds.

ILLINOIS
The month of June, weather conditions varied throughout the state and temperatures were above normal. Rainfall was adequate in northern and southern parts of the state while dryer than normal conditions prevailed in the central region. Bees were working sweet clover, strawberries, white Dutch clover, sweet peas, and potato bloom, which was a notable early bloom.

Some colonies throughout the state had not built up stores due to high winds experienced over the month. Some beekeepers had swarming calls and were adding supers.

Apiary inspections were in full swing with very little mite problems found due to continued fall treatment and beekeeper inspection of colonies over the winter.

Local beekeeper association meetings have had growing interest in organic honey production. Many beekeepers have stressed the new opportunities being presented to produce and sell organic honey. The associations have encouraged with new interest in beekeeping at spring meetings.

Honey sales continued good at the retail level & packer interest in bulk honey was good.

INDIANA
The State Apiary office reported inspectors were busy with spring colony inspections due to the warm temperatures. Northern and southern sections experienced a good spring flow of early white Dutch and wild flowers. Beekeepers were busy adding supers because of the adequate rainfall and warm temperatures that were 5-10 degrees above normal.

Inspections revealed queen problems along with major problems including honey in queen cells, foul, chalk and chill brood. Some Varroa mite infestation was discovered, however the Tracheal mite infestations were not as much of a problem as previous years. The small hive beetle was not discovered in spring inspections.

Some spring nectar & pollen loss was reported in the northern & southern sections due to the June rains. The central section reported spotty areas of continued dry conditions with very little spring flow. Honey sales at retail continued to be good. Bulk honey movement was reported slow.

MICHIGAN & OHIO
Colonies around the state are in good condition. The month of June experienced about normal temperatures. The weather in June was dominated by rain, so soil moisture supplies became excessive in most areas. The bees have fed on a number of sources including clover, legumes and locust. No supplemental feeding was noted in many areas during the month due to the temperatures being about normal for the month. Brood build-up has improved and swarming occurred during the month. Demand for honey was light.

MISSISSIPPI
Colonies around the state were in generally good condition. During the month of June, dry weather was prevalent. Despite the dry weather conditions, honey producers received favorable yields and made surplus honey at many locations. In the southern portions of the state, honey flows off summer titi and Chinese tallow produced good yields. There is currently a dirth of any significant pollen or nectar sources until the fall. In the northern portions of the state bees worked off sumac and sourwood with below favorable results. The Delta and Prairie Belt honey flow off cotton and soybeans is expected in July.

MISSOURI & IOWA
Precipitation was generally well above normal in both states with many areas excessive. This has broken the drought & now only a few isolated areas are below normal on precipitation for the year. Temperatures averaged slightly above normal in both Iowa & Missouri. Beekeepers were busy putting on supers, finishing moving hives from tree pollination to summer locations, and controlling swarms. Bees for melon pollination in Southeast Missouri & Northeast Arkansas were still in the fields.

Honey flow from white Dutch clover & sweet clover was good except in a few bottom locations that had major thunder storms and flash flooding during some of the storms. Some extra nectar should have been gathered from alfalfa as timely harvest of the second cutting was delayed by rain in some locations. Some honey was extracted and some comb honey was put up for retail and to show at the upcoming county fairs. Beekeepers are watching scouting reports on cotton to be ready to take preventive measures to prevent worker bee loss when the cotton needs treatment for insects. Bees were working white Dutch and yellow or white sweet clover depending on how far north they go for nectar.

MONTANA
The first half of June, weather conditions were variable across the state. Record-breaking heat, with temperatures in the mid to upper 90's, was followed by several cool days. The weather returned to seasonable levels the last two weeks of June. Daytime highs were in the 80's and nighttime lows were mostly in the 40's but occasionally dropped below freezing around Yellowstone.

Precipitation was frequently widespread across the state, but amounts were not sufficient to bring many areas up to the normal levels for this time of year. Central counties are especially suffering as spring crops are showing extreme water stress. Lack of irrigation water has caused some growers to accelerate their first cutting of alfalfa. By the end of June, topsoil moisture was still 33% short.

Despite the dry conditions, especially in the south and central sections, the bees are reported to be in good condition. Packages were added and bees were set in canola and sweet clover. Even though some of these crops are irrigated, wells are beginning to go dry. Some beekeepers were moving their bees to the northern part of the state where temperatures are usually cooler.

NEVADA
A really hot June has brought on the honey flow in Nevada. Most colonies are strong and at their seasonal peak. Few beekeepers have been pulling supers already. Floral sources in June have been alfalfa, sweet clover, thistle, milkweed and various annual flowers. Continued real hot weather may affect the overall length of the honey flow.

NEW ENGLAND
Weather for the first couple of weeks of June continued to be unsettled with cool and wet conditions prevailing and temperatures averaging around 65 degrees. During the last couple of weeks of the month, the weather turned more seasonable with temperatures in the 80s with some humid days ranging into the 90s.

Migratory beekeepers are now returning to the area to work the cranberry bogs of Southern New England through mid-July. Native beekeepers reported the blueberry pollination went well, and that there bees are now working various plants including white clover and wild flowers. Honey flow this year has been good with most beekeepers adding extra supers.

NEW YORK
Colonies around the state are in generally good condition. The month of June experienced frequent rainfall, which has become a concern for the beekeepers because it has kept the bees confined and overcrowded. No supplemental feeding was needed. The bees are gathering pollen and nectar from raspberries, wild apples and pears, dandelion and fruit nectar. The bees have been doing a lot of swarming. There was above normal precipitation and normal to below normal temperatures during the month. Demand for honey was light.

NORTH CAROLINA
A good portion of the state received much needed rainfall during the last couple of weeks of June. Even with this in mind, moisture levels are still only fair across much of the state. This moisture has raised optimism about the upcoming Sourwood flow. Colonies are generally in good condition. Movement at the retail level has been fairly strong.

OREGON
Weather conditions varied across the state the first ten days of June. Coastal areas were as much as 4 degrees above normal while the Willamette Valley and Eastern Oregon reported temperatures 4-7 degrees below normal. Rainfall ranged from over 2" along the coast to just over an inch in the east. From the 25-27th, hot weather produced several daily-record highs when Tillamook noted temperatures of 79, 80 & 85 degrees. On the 27th, the Dalles soared to 100 degrees. For the year, about 2/3 of the state is still below normal rainfall.

The bees are looking very good right now as they were busy pollinating blackberries, which were about done by the end of the month. They were also working vetch, crimson and red clover and cranberries along the coast where they had good conditions for pollination and berry set. The last half of June, some bees were moved into the radish, onion and carrot seed fields for pollination.

Pollination fees are reported to be up this year. Extracting is expected to begin after the 4th of July with the crop expected to be about average to slightly above.

UTAH
Strong winds and a lack of rain has brought hive development to a halt in Utah. Hives in irrigated areas report the start of a honey flow, but due to the strong winds not nearly the volume that was expected. Floral sources are mainly from the irrigated fields of clover and alfalfa.

WASHINGTON
Western Washington started the month with warm, sunny days while Central and Eastern Washington received as much as 3" of badly needed rain. The rains continued, this time hitting Western Washington as well, for the next two weeks. Temperatures were also cool with daytime highs as much as 7 degrees below normal. Drier conditions finished the month and temperatures rose into the 80's in Western Washington and into the low 90's in parts of Eastern Washington. Vancouver set a record high on the 27th when their daily high hit 98 degrees.

On the west side of the state, the bees are reported to be in very good condition. They are bringing in lots of nectar from blackberries and raspberries earlier in the month. Some vegetable seed growers are concerned they did not get a good set because the weather was so cool and rainy during pollination. Beekeepers were also busy moving their hives into the foothills of the Cascades where fireweed was just beginning to bloom. Warm temperatures should bring on a good nectar flow. Swarming was a big problem if beekeepers didn't check their colonies often.

Bees in Central and Eastem Washington are also in very good shape. Warm temperatures and higher than normal humidity has been very good for the blooming plants. Bees are able to bring in lots of nectar from alfalfa, clover and miscellaneous wildflowers. Irrigation water is still more than adequate to get growers through the summer.

Bees setting in the clover fields of North and South Dakota are doing well but rain is needed.

WISCONSIN
The month of June, temperatures were 5-15 degrees below normal. Northern sections received some frost that slowed plant growth. The southern section by contrast experienced some above normal temperatures and high humidity followed by cool temperatures. Rainfall was short in the northern part of the state while southern sections had a surplus of rainfall causing minor flooding in some areas.

Honeybees continued a rapid buildup of honey and pollen over most of the southern section. Beekeepers added supers, however some swarming was reported. In some areas the early flow of light honey was short due to the rapid warm-up followed by a sudden cold snap that damaged bloom.

A reported case of hives infested by the Small Hive Beetle had been identified by University of Wisconsin Entomology department. The beetle discovered was a look alike, Sap Beetle. The Sap Beetle is 3/16" long and has a uniformly black elongated body. The Small Hive Beetle is a bigger 5/16" long with a more rounded shape. The reported mistaken Small Hive Beetle has pointed out Beekeeper's concern over the pest.

Honey and wax movement demand was moderate with very little price change from last month. Retail honey sales were reported fairly good.