NATIONAL HONEY MARKET NEWS
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE DIVISION
21 N. 1st AVENUE, SUITE 224
YAKIMA, WA 98902-2663




HONEY MARKET FOR THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER, 2000 IN VOLUMES OF 10,000 POUNDS OR GREATER.

PRICES PAID TO BEEKEEPERS FOR EXTRACTED, UNPROCESSED HONEY IN MAJOR PRODUCING STATES BY PACKERS, HANDLERS & OTHER LARGE USERS, CENTS PER POUND, F.O.B. OR DELIVERED NEARBY, CONTAINERS EXCHANGED OR RETURNED, PROMPT DELIVERY & PAYMENT UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

ARKANSAS
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 49¢
-
SOYBEAN, LIGHT AMBER, 48¢

CALIFORNIA
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 50¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 40 - 49¢
- ALFALFA/CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 49¢
- BLUE CURL, WHITE, 50¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 45¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 45¢
- ORANGE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 53 - 54¢
- ORANGE/SAGE, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 50¢ (SMALL LOTS)

COLORADO
- ALFALFA, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 52¢

FLORIDA
- BRAZILIAN PEPPER/WILDFLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 45¢
- GALLBERRY, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 60¢
- GALLBERRY/SAW PALMETTO, LIGHT AMBER, 42¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 43¢
- ORANGE, WATER WHITE, 53¢ (SMALL LOT) EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 60¢
- ORANGE, LIGHT AMBER, 68¢ - - - AMBER, 58¢
- WILDFLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 45¢

GEORGIA
- GALLBERRY, LIGHT AMBER, 55¢ - - - CUT COMB, $1.25 - 1.40

IDAHO
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 50¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 40¢
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 46¢ (SMALL LOT)
- MINT, AMBER, 37¢ (SMALL LOT)

LOUISIANA
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 43¢ - - - BAKERY GRADE, 42¢

MICHIGAN
- CLOVER, WHITE, 52¢
- KNAPWEED, MEDIUM AMBER, 65¢

MINNESOTA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 53¢

MONTANA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 56¢

NEBRASKA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 60¢

NORTH DAKOTA
- BUCKWHEAT, WHITE, 58¢
- CLOVER, EXTRA WHITE, 54 - 56¢ - - - WHITE, 53 - 56¢
- CLOVER, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 54¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 52¢

OREGON
- BLACKBERRY, WHITE, 61¢ (SMALL LOT)
- CLOVER, WHITE, 61¢ (SMALL LOT)
- WILDFLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 56¢ (SMALL LOT)

SOUTH DAKOTA
- CLOVER, EXTRA WHITE, 56¢ - - - WHITE, 50 - 58¢
- SUNFLOWER/MIXED FLOWERS, WHITE, 55¢

WASHINGTON
- ALFALFA, LIGHT AMBER, 40 - 41¢
- BERRY MIX, AMBER, 37¢
- BLACKBERRY, WHITE, 50¢ (SMALL LOT)
- BUCKWHEAT, DARK AMBER, 33¢ (SMALL LOT)
- CARROT, AMBER, 37¢ (SMALL LOT)
- CLOVER, WHITE, 49.5¢ - - - LIGHT AMBER, 40¢
- FIREWEED, WHITE, 50¢ (SMALL LOT)
- MINT, AMBER, 37 - 41¢ - - - DARK AMBER, 32¢
- RASPBERRY, WHITE, 50¢
- SNOWBERRY, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 47¢ (SMALL LOT)
- WILDFLOWERS, WHITE, 50¢ (SMALL LOT)

WISCONSIN
- BASSWOOD, LIGHT AMBER, 69¢
- CLOVER, WHITE, 58 - 59¢

WYOMING
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 60¢
- ALFALFA/CLOVER, WHITE, 58¢



PRICES PAID TO CANADIAN BEEKEEPERS FOR UNPROCESSED BULK HONEY BY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS IN U.S. CURRENCY, F.O.B. SHIPPING POINT, CONTAINERS INCLUDED UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED. DUTY AND CROSSING CHARGES EXTRA. CENTS PER POUND.

ALBERTA
- CLOVER, EXTRA WHITE, 56¢

MANITOBA
- RAPESEED/CLOVER, WHITE, 54¢

WINNIPEG
- ALFALFA, WHITE, 53¢

PROVINCE & FLORAL SOURCE UNKNOWN
- WHITE, 57¢



PRICES PAID TO IMPORTERS FOR BULK HONEY, DUTY PAID, CONTAINERS INCLUDED, CENTS PER POUND EX-DOCK OR POINT OF ENTRY UNLESS OTHERWISE STATED.

EAST COAST. . . ARGENTINA
- CLOVER, WHITE, 49 - 55¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, WHITE, 49 - 50¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 49 - 50¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 48¢
- FLORAL UNKNOWN, WHITE, 52 - 53¢

EAST COAST. . . CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 48¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 48¢

WEST COAST. . . CHINA
- MIXED FLOWERS, EXTRA LIGHT AMBER, 47¢
- MIXED FLOWERS, LIGHT AMBER, 43 - 45¢



CALIFORNIA BEESWAX MARKET SITUATION --- NOVEMBER, 2000
(unbleached, raw beeswax, delivered to handlers's warehouse)

Producers delivered quite a bit of wax during November but many handlers still weren't requiring a lot. The only sales of finished products were to candle companies and they were even slower than previous years.

Light and medium colored wax was being traded at mostly $1.30 per pound. There were no reports of any dark wax being purchased.


COLONY, HONEY PLANT & MARKET CONDITIONS DURING NOVEMBER

APPALACHIAN DISTRICT
- (MD, PA, VA, WV)
Cold weather has arrived to the District with temperatures averaging 10-15 degrees below normal. Daytime highs have been in the 40's and lower 50's with some days not getting out of the 30's. Precipitation was very light and the area is still very dry. Concern remains about the ability of some colonies to make it through the winter due to poor honey stores. Careful monitoring is being practiced.

CALIFORNIA
Rainshowers were reported across the state the first few days of November accompanied by gusty winds. The clouds cleared out and several low pressure systems moved across the state throughout the remainder of the month. The most significant impact of the fronts was the very cold temperatures in all areas of the state. Daily record lows were reported on the 12th including 27 in Redding and a few days later 30 degree lows were reported in the San Joaquin Valley. On the 17th, Santa Barbara also had a low of 30 degrees which was their fourth daily-record low in seven days. To the end of November, temperatures continued to be as much as 10-12 degrees below normal in most sections of the state.

Beekeepers are very happy with the condition of the bees going into winter. A few areas could use a little more rain but the cool weather was actually beneficial as the bees were tightly clustered and not eating their winter stores. Producers were also making sure to take frequent samples to test for mites. Local bees have already been treated but there is some concern about bees coming in from out-of-state. Bees from as far away as the Dakotas and Minnesota were being brought to California holding yards during November. Some of these bees were being fed pollen substitute and sugar syrup.

Some packers report having problems getting adequate amounts of honey because producers are holding their crops until the details of the new loan program are released. They are also waiting to see what happens with the anit-dumping suite against China and Argentina. Because of that, a few packers purchased large amounts of both foreigh and domestic honey early in the season. Sales of bottled honey varied from only fair to good because of the holidays.

COLORADO
During the month of November, the average temperature for the Denver area was 39 degrees for the high and 16 for the low. This gave a mean temperature of 27.5 degrees for the month. That figure was about eight degrees colder than normal, and the second coldest month on record. Most of the state received moisture in the form of snow during most of the month, with most mountain areas receiving from 6 inches to 24 inches. The eastern plains received very little precipitation during the month. Because of the cold weather, most beekeepers around the state provided supplemental feeding to their colonies for most of the month. All migratory colonies have been placed at their winter yards in California and south Texas and are reported to be in fairly good condition at this time.

GEORGIA
Colonies around the state were generally in good condition. The fall honey flows in October and November were considered poor at most locations. Bees were unable to increase their level of stores in most areas around the state. Due to the unfavorable honey flows in the fall, beekeepers were actively involved in late October-early November in supplemental feeding as colonies approach the winter months. Feeding was heavy at some locations. Additional activities in November included fall maintenance programs by beekeepers.

IDAHO
November was cold with only a few days warm enough for the bees to get out for a cleansing flight. Migratory beekeepers continued to stockpile their hives in preparation for the upcoming pollination season. As many as 18 beekeepers participated in Idaho Department of Agriculture mite survey. Samples were taken in September and October with over 600 samples submitted. Results are not expected to be released until after the New Year.

ILLINOIS
The beekeepers reported that most bees were in good condition heading into winter. Temperatures were generally above normal over the state the first of the month. Mid-month temperatures were cooler & below normal readings were reported. The last of the month, seasonable reading were reported. Cleansing flights were reported in northern sections while central & southern sections experienced high winds which prevented normal cleansing flight activity.

The Illinois State Beekeepers' Association held their autumn meeting. The Chief Apiary Inspector shared his annual Apiary Inspection report. For the year 2000, the state lost approximately 66 beekeepers however, there were 57 new beekeepers registered over the year.

Some beekeepers had started supplemental feeding after removing mite treatment strips.

Honey movement was reported very good due to holiday baking. Bulk movement has been slow for packers and commercial beekeepers. Honey prices were about unchanged with prices quoted in the 55-60 cent range. This continues the trend of lower prices from previous years.

INDIANA
Most outside activities were wrapped up the first of the month due to above normal temperatures. Beekeepers removed mite treatment strips and overwintering wrapping was put in place. Many beekeepers started supplemental feeding of sugar syrup due to favorable weather.

Honeybees were working no floral sources due to several days of low overnight temperatures and killing frost. Readings in southern Indiana were reported low as 16 degrees the 22nd of the month. Average temperatures for the month were generally 4 to 8 degrees above normal.

Honeybees were in good condition heading into winter with very little problems being reported.

Demand for honey was very good, as holiday baking has increased. Bulk honey sales were slow and prices have remained about unchanged. The retail level sales were generally unchanged.

MISSISSIPPI
Colonies around the state were generally in good condition. There was very little activity occurring in the state during November with the exception of supplemental feeding of colonies. Activities also included fall maintenance programs.

MISSOURI & IOWA
The November weather was dry as precipitation ranged below normal. Bees are not eating much & there was no activity due to cooler than normal weather for this time of year. There were also a few mixed number of days of warm weather when the bees could get out of the hives for cleansing flights which also helps keep down Varroa Mites. They are projecting there will be higher winter losses this year due to the Varroa Mites and the varying weather conditions.

Some beekeepers have moved their bees to California for pollination next spring. Others have moved to Texas because of the mites and more working days to keep down the mites. There is no nectar and very little pollen. The bees that are still in Iowa and Missouri are basically consuming what's in the hive.

MONTANA
An early-season snowstorm buried eastern Montana the beginning of November. The snow was followed by cold temperatures that were as low as minus 10 - 20 degrees. A few days later, another storm dumped 14" of snow to some areas along the northern plains. The later half of November, weather conditions returned to more normal.

Migratory beekeepers finished hauling their bees to California holding yards. The early, heavy snow caused problems the beginning of November as beekeepers couldn't reach their hives. They had to wait for the County to clear the roads. The bees that were treated look good but thee were some losses in weaker colonies.

NEVADA
Other than repairing equipment most beekeepers have finished for the year. Sales of honey in the health food stores have been good this season.

NORTH CAROLINA
It has been almost two years since the discovery of the first Small Hive Beetle in North Carolina. Even though there is a quarantine in all areas where they have been found, they are still spreading very slowly. Currently the the beetles have been found in 15 of the 100 counties. According to apiary officials, the problem is not as bad as it sounds, because in most of these counties, the problem is very isolated. Licensed applicators are using Check Mite to control the problem. Beekeepers are urged to be vigilant in looking for this problem.

The fall honey flow was reported to have been good in the Mountains and the Coastal Plains, but only fair in the Piedmont portion of the state. The first half of the month was still fairly dry, but rain and even a cold snap complete with a couple of inches of snow on the 19th has helped the soil moisture across the state.

Along with monitoring for pests, beekeepers are being urged to be prepared to do some feeding during the upcoming months.

OREGON
The beginning of November was generally weather wise. The middle of the month, daily record lows were recorded in Portland when they dropped to 28 degrees on the 18th and Eugene reported 20 degrees a day later. The remainder of the month was fairly mild.

The bees are reported to be in very good condition going into the colder winter months. Conditions were so mild the first part of the month, a few beekeepers were still extracting a little late honey flow. Some producers reported problems with colony size being down from when they were checked earlier. No reason for the decline has been discovered.

UTAH
A cold November brought the bees back to the hive early this year. Colonies are strong going into winter. Migratory beekeepers are readying their equipment and hives for the trip to California later this month. Plenty of honey for sale, minimal buying activity.

WASHINGTON
November was mostly cold across the entire state. Spokane received 5.9" of snow on November 8th & 9th which was good because it protected some winter crops from the cold. On November 11th, Spokane received their earliest sub-zero cold on record when they dropped to minus 2 degrees. The cold continued for the next ten days when high temperatures were only at or below 32 degrees. Temperatures in other areas of the state were also as much as 11 degrees below normal, especially east of the Cascade Mountains. Seattle was also setting records of a different kind when they recorded a 13-day dry spell from the 10-22nd. By the end of the month, Seattle's rainfall stood at 1.84" or 38% of normal.

Bees were either set in open fields or were taken to holding yards in California for the winter. Most producers will go back down to California at least one more time before the end of the year to check on the condition of their bees.

WISCONSIN
Weather conditions the first of the month were ideal for the honeybees. They had numerous cleansing flights due to temperature that were ten degrees above normal. The remainder of the month, temperatures returned to more seasonal.

Rainfall for the period was spotty with many areas receiving less than a quarter inch. While most areas had little rainfall, some areas of the southern sections had rainfall that caused standing water in fields.

The State Apiary Department reported the state fall survey showed a marked decrease in Varroa Mite infestations. Only 47% of checked hives were found infected. In 1999, the fall survey showed 60% of tested hives were infected with Varroa mites. Most beekeepers treatment plans seem to have been showing success. Due to the last three milder than normal winters combined with closer inspections by beekeepers, brood diseases have shown decreases. Noteworthy was decreases in Chalkbrood and American Foulbrood.

Commercial demand continued to be slow with little bulk movement reported. Retail demand continued to be good due holiday baking.


HONEY INDUSTRY VOTES AGAINST CHANGING CHECKOFF PROGRAM

WASHINGTON, November 9, 2000--The nation's honey producers, producer-packers, handlers, and importers voted against amending the honey research and promotion program. The vote was taken in a referendum conducted by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Marketing Service Sept. 5-29.

This means that producer & importer assessments will remain at 1 cent per pound, a handler assessment will not be implemented, mandatory purity standards and an inspection & monitoring system will not be authorized & the National Honey Board will not be required to spend 8% of its funds on beekeeping & production research. In the referendum, 30.33% of the voters voted in favor of the amendments. These voters account for 51.26% of the pounds of honey represented by all of the voters in the referendum. The amendments needed the approval of a majority of the votes cast and those votes must have represented 50% or more of the pounds of honey of those who voted.

AMS will issue a final rule in the near future to implement other amendments to the program that were not subject to a referendum vote. These amendments will:

(1)
change the size and composition of the board

(2)
authorize the board to develop a voluntary quality assurance program

(3)
eliminate the requirement for small companies to file for an exemption in order to avoid paying assessments.

The honey research and promotion program is a self-help program funded by the honey industry and supervised by the Agricultural Marketing Service.