Leeting my bees bee
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Noblesville, IN US
    Posts
    57

    Default Leeting my bees bee

    I started researching and built my first topbar around 5/14. I made my first topbar mid June of 14'. Got a 3 lb package on 7/10/14.

    See thread here
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...f-my-first-TBH

    I have never treated my bees with anything and I have never purchased more bees. It was a one time package of bees for $130 and a free TB have from scrap...maybe $10 bucks in hinges.

    I gave that initial package some sugar water but have never gave them anything since.

    They made it through the first year, I collected their swarm and built another hive.

    Since 2014 I have lost one hive mid summer which I attribute to farm crop pesticides.

    I only take about a gallon of honey, if that, from each hive usually in the fall.

    As mentioned...I have never treated or supplemented...but I have seen plenty of mites and moths.

    The local bee club don't want my free swarms cause the bees are too big to fit their cells.

    Both hives were out today pooping after a unusual 3 week cold spell of up to -15f.

    They seem to correct the comb by placing straight comb on each side of new comb...in the early days. Now I don't even bother.

    They never seem to build past halfway each year. I see other build full in the first year

    I have spent about $50 in a smoker and hoodie so my total cost has been less the $200.


    What am I doing wrong? /sarc

    Seriously, am I just lucky?

    Do bees correct themselves or self clean the mites?

    Does leaving most of their honey help?

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Arlington Hts, IL
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Leeting my bees bee

    I started last year and have the same intentions. Mine were out yesterday as well. I only took one bar late last year, and gave away most. Still have a decent amount left in the house and 10 bars of capped in the hive.

    I know there are very strong opinions both ways on treating and not treating. Feeding and not feeding (I never had to).

    Time will tell and I hope to have a similar experience to you.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Grand Junction, CO, USA
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Leeting my bees bee

    Quote Originally Posted by Rairdog View Post
    I started researching and built my first topbar around 5/14. I made my first topbar mid June of 14'. Got a 3 lb package on 7/10/14.

    See thread here
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...f-my-first-TBH

    I have never treated my bees with anything and I have never purchased more bees. It was a one time package of bees for $130 and a free TB have from scrap...maybe $10 bucks in hinges.

    I gave that initial package some sugar water but have never gave them anything since.

    They made it through the first year, I collected their swarm and built another hive.

    Since 2014 I have lost one hive mid summer which I attribute to farm crop pesticides.

    I only take about a gallon of honey, if that, from each hive usually in the fall.

    As mentioned...I have never treated or supplemented...but I have seen plenty of mites and moths.

    The local bee club don't want my free swarms cause the bees are too big to fit their cells.

    Both hives were out today pooping after a unusual 3 week cold spell of up to -15f.

    They seem to correct the comb by placing straight comb on each side of new comb...in the early days. Now I don't even bother.

    They never seem to build past halfway each year. I see other build full in the first year

    I have spent about $50 in a smoker and hoodie so my total cost has been less the $200.


    What am I doing wrong? /sarc

    Seriously, am I just lucky?

    Do bees correct themselves or self clean the mites?

    Does leaving most of their honey help?

    You got a package with some good genetics ( that is not common ) Most packages, need propped up, feed heavy treated just to survive 2 winters. I have never got one past the 2nd winter. I caught a swarm 2015, everything I have now comes from that hive. I do not treat and leave honey for their winter stores. I would feed sugar if I HAD to, but would rather not harvest honey so they have plenty. I am convinced that we must develop, propagate bees that can survive not keep propping up bees that can't stay alive without "poisons" You have been blessed with some good bees, I think you ought to make splits in to small nucs and sell them on Facebook or Craigs list as survivors, there are other keepers who would love to have your " big " survivors in their yards.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Bergen County, NJ
    Posts
    789

    Default Re: Leeting my bees bee

    Do you know of any other beekeepers near your apiary ? If so, how far are they (say in miles) ?
    Are you in urban or rural area ?
    Do you open the hives regularly and monitor ?
    How frequently do you take notes and have evidence of same hive genetics continuing through years ?

    How do you know its "your" bees in those hives continuing generation after generation ?

    Yes, when left to their own devices, with no expectations of honey, they can and do manage on their own. And some colonies don't. There is also research evidence backing up various ways colonies can manage themselves against varroa etc. Too lazy to copy & paste, but there is a research showing mite reproductive capabilities going down the longer they stay without honeybee brood to infest and that is often the case with repeated swarming. The same research article also talks about decreased mite fecundity over generations in cells that were heavily used before .

    Then there is research around specific types of DWV working against other types of DWV etc.

    Randy Oliver (scientificbeekeeping) has articles showing genetic analysis of managed vs wild colonies and how they differ. If NO honeybee colony in North America survived mites on their own, we would not have wild colonies or genetic differences between wild and managed colonies.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Rib Lake WI
    Posts
    1,337

    Default Re: Leeting my bees bee

    I think the guys name is tom sealy well any way go to YouTube and watch the latest national honey show videos. He has a very interesting insights on how bees can cope with varroa by themselves .

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •