Spontaneous Combustion - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 48 of 48
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Geauga, Ohio
    Posts
    155

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    Oh and mite frass is a lot easier to see with a headlamp. It's always on the ROOF of the cell. I don't know WHY I'm using so many caps today! Just feeling loud.

  2. Remove Advertisements
    BeeSource.com
    Advertisements
     

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Morro Bay, California, USA
    Posts
    2,104

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    Not enough detail in the pix to make a diagnosis for the dead out. In the second pix (of the two comb), I believe the comb on the left shows scattered (shot hole) Drone cells. This is likely due to a drone layer queen or a laying worker situation. The hive has likely been in decline for months (and the initial cause is too far gone to determine), the hive was robbed (as per chewed cells in the detail picture) at the terminal stage.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,162

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    @SiWolke,

    I think you completely misunderstand the situation - there is nothing heartbreaking about it. My bees are largely fine (except for the ones that perished because of the toxic smoke in the fire.) I have been put to significant expense, and quite a bit of extra effort to deal with this, but that does not trouble me.

    What I did learn, though, is that there is an enormous and powerful undertow against doing the obvious, and correct thing, under my particular circumstances, which was to simply treat the colonies with OxyTet and get on with it. That's a mistake I will not make again.

    I may have gotten the infection from my visit to another beekeeper who had EFB. I may gotten it from a small swarm I hived the previous summer (the only new bees that have come to my yard for a couple of years, a colony which died the day after the fire - and whose resources I used later on in the spring). I may have gotten it from my bees robbing out a nearby hive, whether feral or managed. Or I may have had the bacteria in my hives all along, and it simply overwhelmed some of my fire-stressed colonies and became an overt, increasing problem last spring.

    I dithered over the treatment decision partly because of all the foolishness attached to the treatment-free beekeeping cannon these days. I read and pondered all the condemnations of treating bees with antibiotics and I struggled to see a clear path for my bees, in my situation, among the conflicting points of view.

    I did not weaken my colonies by treating them. I did not weaken the bees' collective genetic pool by treating my bees. I certainly protected all the nearby colonies by arresting the downward spiral of the illness in my colonies before they could become victims of robbing. I actively culled all the drone-brood from my sick colonies (though there was almost none). I made absolutely sure that I didn't lose a swarm from any colony - healthy or not - during the period when some of the colonies in my yard were sick. I prevented any equipment removed from the sick hives from being visited by bees while awaiting gamma-radiation treatment next spring. I took considerable, and on-going, pains to prevent any infection from passing through me to any of my students' colonies. And I was very careful to make sure my use of OxyTet was correctly dosed, and applied exactly as prescribed so as not to undertreat and contribute to the build up of resistance.

    And I consider myself, and my bees, very lucky to live close enough to a bee-vet to enable me to obtain the needed medicine to help them get well again.

    My only concern now is avoiding, or reducing, the chances of re-infection from within the colonies, through still-contagious bacteria remaining on the combs or in the stores. Only time will tell if what I was able to accomplish this year was enough, or whether (as apparently is common with EFB) it takes more that one year to lower the bacteria load sufficiently to reduce the problem to something the bees can take care of their own.

    And I never lost my joy and affection for my bees, despite their need for intensive care this summer.

    Nancy

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Weston, ME
    Posts
    992

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    ...
    I may have gotten the infection from my visit to another beekeeper who had EFB. I may gotten it from a small swarm I hived the previous summer (the only new bees that have come to my yard for a couple of years, a colony which died the day after the fire - and whose resources I used later on in the spring). I may have gotten it from my bees robbing out a nearby hive, whether feral or managed. Or I may have had the bacteria in my hives all along, and it simply overwhelmed some of my fire-stressed colonies and became an overt, increasing problem last spring.
    ...
    Nancy
    I would consider a quarantine out-yard. Put any new colonies there until you know the state of their health.
    - - Michael Joel
    1 John 3:3-4, Matthew 5:19, Matthew 5:18, James 2:17-20, 1 John 5:2-3

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,178

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    enjambres>> I am happy after reading your post tonight. You have been as diligent as anyone in controlling and understanding the situation.
    Just a couple of thoughts:
    > Many of us (I) have delayed taking action for a multitude of reasons, so you are not alone there. In retrospect, most of us (I) also wish we (I) had not delayed action at the time. We are human. We move on with what we have learned.
    > The affects of stress can not be under estimated. Colonies can do wonders working through a mild case. Requeening and feeding fresh syrup has worked for me in the past, not everytime, but it's worth keeping under your hat.
    Spring time can be a stressful time for a multitude of reasons. Pollen sub and syrup in the spring may remove some stress in colonies that fought a battle last year.
    > Good about the oxytet it has a short 1/2 life. Tylan doesn't.
    >I wouldn't treat prophylactically in the spring either.

    All the best to you.
    "Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:........" Alexander Pope 1709

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,162

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    Thank you, Clyderoad -

    You have been very helpful to me throughout this; a great source of contacts and offering useful observations from the point of view of someone who has actually dealt with EFB (and not just read about it).

    I studied the link to the BIP/EFB-blog you passed on yesterday. The pictures were very good, and I'm happy to say they bear no resemblance to what I was seeing in my formerly-sick colonies this fall. (Nor last fall either.) But aside from the excellent pictures, some of the author's assertions about the interaction of mites, as an amplifying primary vector of EFB (as opposed to being a primary stressor) didn't entirely convince me. Maybe the author has done more work on that theory than is visible on that link? It seemed like some of his ideas were proceeding a bit in advance of what is well-accepted science. I will have more time to follow up on that during the winter.

    Nancy

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,162

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    MikeJ,

    The swarm I hived on July 1 of 2016 (it was bivouacked on my next door neighbor's blueberry bush, so it was quite a local swarm, though not from my yard) was taken to a quarantine area and did not join my bees until I was packing everybody up for winter. It looked fine all summer.

    And in its defense, I actually took a frame of brood from it early last fall and donated it to a student's hive to test for queenrightness. The student's hive never showed any sign of EFB last spring, nor has it since then. That colony (my student's) wound up being moved to another beekeeper quite close to me this summer, so I have continued to examine it regularly.

    I am a firm believer in quarantine yards and the enthusiasm that some people have for hiving swarms from hither and yon and bringing them home to their own yard gives me the willies. But eventually, if all looks well, as it did in the case of the swarm last fall, you have to move them out of quarantine. Or start a new yard, which I haven't got time for.

    Nancy

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Rutland County, Vermont,USA
    Posts
    838

    Default Re: Spontaneous Combustion

    Nancy, Are you referring to my hives that may have brought EFB into your apiary? I have read your previous posts about having EFB but never considered that they came from my hives because the state beekeeper didn't think it was EFB and the test came back NEG. J

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •