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Thread: tick control

  1. #1
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    Default tick control

    This looks like it will be the worst year for ticks in recent history. While I spray myself well and wear a suit in my outyards I have a concern for my own yard. I have a few hives in a non grass area and the bees aren't really foraging anything in my yard that I can see.
    Does anyone put some type of poison control in their yards to keep the family and dogs safer? The dog has religious monthly advantix treatments but I've found dead ticks on him already attached. Grass is mowed but I have a lot of garden area that i'm sure are teeming with them.
    Would a granule vs a spray be any better? Applying at night? This problem is just going to get worse
    Terrence - 2 full years....still a newb

  2. #2
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    Aug 2011
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    Landing, NJ, USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    Chickens and guinea foul both consider ticks to be a tasty treat. Guinea foul are noisy and hard to confine. I don't know if you can have either where you are.
    Bill

  3. #3
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    Default Re: tick control

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskers View Post
    Chickens and guinea foul both consider ticks to be a tasty treat. Guinea foul are noisy and hard to confine. I don't know if you can have either where you are.
    Bill
    Really don't want to have any more animals to deal with. The dog also seems way too interested in chickens.
    Terrence - 2 full years....still a newb

  4. #4
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    Alexandria, MN
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    Default Re: tick control

    As far as I know anything you will apply for ticks would be something that would kill bees. Somebody may certainly come through and correct me but applying an insecticide seems like a bad idea. Treat pets. Keep grass short. Consider some sort of landscaping bark between woods and grass. Chase away the mice and deer if possible. As has been said guinea fowl are great at killing ticks. We don't have a problem with ticks here, but if we did I'd be getting guinea for certain.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  5. #5
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    Mar 2015
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    Niagara Co., NY, USA
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    42

    Default Re: tick control

    Bees are insects, ticks are arachnids. To kill insects requires an insecticide. To kill arachnids requires an arachnicide. Two different pesticides.

  6. #6
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    Sep 2014
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    Sumner County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    You could take a look at permethrin. I woud spray it after the dusk, on-label, for tick control. I have not tried this on grass, etc, but I do treat my protective clothing (bee suit) etc. Sawyer makes a permethrin spray for clothing if you do not want to mix it up yourself.

  7. #7
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    Sep 2008
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    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
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    2,322

    Default Re: tick control

    The granules work well for me, I have used them for years in my bee yard and have seen no problems. I spread them late or just before a rain.
    40 years - 25 colonies, 32 Nucs - IPM disciple - Naturally Skeptic

  8. #8
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    615

    Default Re: tick control

    http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles...thrin-ext.html

    Check out the effect on other animals section. Permethrin is "extremely toxic" to bees.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  9. #9
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    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    I have the same tick issues that you have and the only way I have been able to adapt is by changing my own behavior.

    I no longer have outdoor cats. If I had a dog, I would do as you do, treat it with a neo-nic, though the newer consumed products may not be neo-nic, but Advantix is.

    I never sit on the grass, ever. We have benches and chairs strategically placed around.

    I wear light colored trousers tucked into light colored socks - the total dork look, but effective for spotting ticks. I never wear the outdoor pants indoors, and certainly would never sit on a chair or couch with them on. I strip off right in my mudroom and the clothes stay in the hamper there until they hit the Miele washer at 205 F.

    I start every day with full-body tick check. I change out of the morning's outdoor clothes at lunch-time, shower and do another tick check. And the same drill when I finally come in for the evening, if I've gone out again.

    I have outdoor shoes that I use on the farm and indoor/wear into town shoes. And I make sure not to confuse them! I wear tall boots in the field.

    We keep the lawn mowed and I have changed my landscaping somewhat around the house to discourage chipmunks and field mice which are the reservoirs of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. But this is a farm, and I am not about to mow off the fields. Nor give up rambling in them and the woodlot, or gardening or birdwatching, or beekeeping. I just make sure I have a closed barrier of clothing all around me - and I check for ticks every time I come in and take off my clothes.

    I would never use any insecticide on myself or my clothing, much less around on the grass.

    Although I do not hunt I enrolled my farm in the local QDMA group (as a sanctuary area) which has helped control the deer population because deer are how ticks move around so much.

    I have had Lyme a couple of times, (and my husband once required a month of IV antibiotics when it got in his spinal fluid.) And anaplasmosis (a different tickborne disease) nearly killed me once, so I take ticks very seriously.

    My husband, who has other health issues, will take a prophylactic dose of doxycycline if he finds a tick munching on him. I only do that if I think there's any chance the tick might have been biting me for more than 12 -24 hours. (It takes longer than that for Lyme to be transmitted. Unfortunately anaplasmosis can be transmitted in just a few minutes.) Otherwise I'd be taking that high dose of doxy all the time. As despite all my precautions, I still sometimes get 30-75 bites per year. Though in almost all cases I know they've barely pulled up to the dinner table (me!) I have doubled down on my own behavior modifications this year and have only had three, and two of those were back in the winter when I was slacking off some, so my bad.

    It helps that LL Bean had a terrific sale on their light tan colored jeans last fall. I bought a dozen pairs and find that having a huge supply of fresh pants on hand really helps keep me changing out of them twice a day, if necessary. When I only had 3 or 4, the laundry issues got in the way of that.

    One final thing: the absolute best tick removal tool is the O'Tom tick fork. Nothing else we've tried, and we've tried dozens, even comes close. We get ours at the vet, but they are cheaper on Amazon. Don't settle for substitutes, get the real deal. And keep them all over the place, including your car because nothing is more annoying than being out for the evening and feeling one of the little suckers having a snack and not being able to get it off cleanly and easily. Anything that squishes them just squirts all the icky -infectious - stuff right into you. And will make the bite itch like crazy - even worse than normal.

    My neighbors have guineas and I don't think it's done a thing to reduce the ticks.

    Good luck!

    Enj.

  10. #10
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    May 2013
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    Guilford, CT
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    235

    Default Re: tick control

    Around here they use cedar and peppermint oil. They say it's toxic to bees but I spray and my neigbora do and never an issue. Mind you I live at ground zero minutes from Lyme, CT

  11. #11
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    Sep 2014
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    Sumner County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    Quote Originally Posted by Bush_84 View Post
    Check out the effect on other animals section. Permethrin is "extremely toxic" to bees.
    Avoid spraying them with it.

    Read about the toxicity with contact to a target, after the permethrin has dried.

  12. #12
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    Apr 2015
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    Jackson, Ohio (SE Ohio) USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    With the series of mild winters and proliferation of deer, ticks are here to stay. I'd suggest that we're not going to "control" ticks, but like mites attempt "management" as best we can. We have a farm and inside/outside dogs, so far, the new eight month collars are doing a good job. Interestingly, have gone through the various topical and ingested flea and tick controls for them and effectiveness seems to only last a year or so then off to the next "wonderful thing" the Vet wants to sell. I have cans of deep woods off, etc. on the front porch as a reminder to spray down before going anywhere. generally works for me. Guineas are very effective, remember though, they're also known an burgular alarms, if you value sleeping at night...... Chickens are effective but messy if not contained, if contained they're useless to combat ticks.

  13. #13
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    615

    Default Re: tick control

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    I have the same tick issues that you have and the only way I have been able to adapt is by changing my own behavior.

    I no longer have outdoor cats. If I had a dog, I would do as you do, treat it with a neo-nic, though the newer consumed products may not be neo-nic, but Advantix is.

    I never sit on the grass, ever. We have benches and chairs strategically placed around.

    I wear light colored trousers tucked into light colored socks - the total dork look, but effective for spotting ticks. I never wear the outdoor pants indoors, and certainly would never sit on a chair or couch with them on. I strip off right in my mudroom and the clothes stay in the hamper there until they hit the Miele washer at 205 F.

    I start every day with full-body tick check. I change out of the morning's outdoor clothes at lunch-time, shower and do another tick check. And the same drill when I finally come in for the evening, if I've gone out again.

    I have outdoor shoes that I use on the farm and indoor/wear into town shoes. And I make sure not to confuse them! I wear tall boots in the field.

    We keep the lawn mowed and I have changed my landscaping somewhat around the house to discourage chipmunks and field mice which are the reservoirs of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases. But this is a farm, and I am not about to mow off the fields. Nor give up rambling in them and the woodlot, or gardening or birdwatching, or beekeeping. I just make sure I have a closed barrier of clothing all around me - and I check for ticks every time I come in and take off my clothes.

    I would never use any insecticide on myself or my clothing, much less around on the grass.

    Although I do not hunt I enrolled my farm in the local QDMA group (as a sanctuary area) which has helped control the deer population because deer are how ticks move around so much.

    I have had Lyme a couple of times, (and my husband once required a month of IV antibiotics when it got in his spinal fluid.) And anaplasmosis (a different tickborne disease) nearly killed me once, so I take ticks very seriously.

    My husband, who has other health issues, will take a prophylactic dose of doxycycline if he finds a tick munching on him. I only do that if I think there's any chance the tick might have been biting me for more than 12 -24 hours. (It takes longer than that for Lyme to be transmitted. Unfortunately anaplasmosis can be transmitted in just a few minutes.) Otherwise I'd be taking that high dose of doxy all the time. As despite all my precautions, I still sometimes get 30-75 bites per year. Though in almost all cases I know they've barely pulled up to the dinner table (me!) I have doubled down on my own behavior modifications this year and have only had three, and two of those were back in the winter when I was slacking off some, so my bad.

    It helps that LL Bean had a terrific sale on their light tan colored jeans last fall. I bought a dozen pairs and find that having a huge supply of fresh pants on hand really helps keep me changing out of them twice a day, if necessary. When I only had 3 or 4, the laundry issues got in the way of that.

    One final thing: the absolute best tick removal tool is the O'Tom tick fork. Nothing else we've tried, and we've tried dozens, even comes close. We get ours at the vet, but they are cheaper on Amazon. Don't settle for substitutes, get the real deal. And keep them all over the place, including your car because nothing is more annoying than being out for the evening and feeling one of the little suckers having a snack and not being able to get it off cleanly and easily. Anything that squishes them just squirts all the icky -infectious - stuff right into you. And will make the bite itch like crazy - even worse than normal.

    My neighbors have guineas and I don't think it's done a thing to reduce the ticks.

    Good luck!

    Enj.

    FYI the prophylactic dose of doxycycline has only been studied as a preventative in Lyme and not anaplasmosis.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  14. #14
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    Apr 2015
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    Jackson, Ohio (SE Ohio) USA
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    525

    Default Re: tick control

    "O'Tom Tick Forks," have heard wonderous thing about them so got a set, work fantastic on average size kritters. Around here, we have small slightly larger than "the head of pin" SOB's which they can't grab. Have to resort to a very small pair of hemostats from my fly tying box. When these little guys bite, you're in for a welt and a week or so of itching. We used to have little ticks which were called "rabbit ticks" but these recent ones seem to be a new improved variety. Anyone know what they are?

  15. #15
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    Rensselaer County, NY, USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    The smaller of the O'Tom ticks forks takes larval ticks off of me, pretty often. I get a lot of practice with those tiny puppies because unlike adult ticks I don't feel them prowling around on my skin.

    I'm of two minds about prophylaxis against Anaplasmosis with doxy. My infectious disease doc (a regular one, not one of those Lyme-aware guys) says that he would take the doxy if he lived in an anaplasmosis area.But since it can be transmitted in just minutes and by then it might be too late, I don't routinely do that.

    But I am, um, no spring chicken any more and as you may know Anaplasmosis is much more serious for older folks, and can lead to organ failure. Even without going far, that it was the sickest I've been in my life since I had malaria as a child. It really flattened me and required hospitalization. It put one of my neighbors in the ICU for weeks. She is lucky to have survived.

    If it takes doing extra loads of laundry to have clean tick-free clothes two, or even three, times a day, I'm OK with that.

    Enj.

  16. #16
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    Apr 2011
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    ElDorado,Arkansas,USA
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    Default Re: tick control

    I spray and have no problems.Cut grass so nothing blooming and then spray.

  17. #17
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    Mar 2013
    Location
    Oxford, Maine
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    281

    Default Re: tick control

    Dog Tick population has exploded here , Deer ticks not so bad.
    They are everywhere, just had one crawling up my leg and haven't even been outside yet today. Was probably
    hanging out in my sneaker from yesterday.

    There are contractors who will come and spray the cedar and peppermint oil , $100 bucks to do an average size yard of an acre or so.
    We have way to much ground to cover so just take precautions , be vigilant about checking yourself for them and treat certain yard clothes with the Sawyers
    Pemethrin spay.
    The Deer Ticks are the ones that can cause illness but only about 40% of them carry the virus so i've read.

    Also, keep a small jar with a cover like a used spice container in the house with a little rubbing alcohol in it to
    dispose of the little bugers , kills them in about 1 minute.
    Last edited by woodsy; 05-20-2017 at 04:54 AM.

  18. #18
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    Mar 2015
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    Triadelphia, West Virginia
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    452

    Default Re: tick control

    I plan on using the granules once I get back on my feet. I'm going through lymes now. I was in the hospital for 13 days and have been home now for two. This has been a total nightmare. Mine went undiagnosed for 10 months and went into my spinal fluid. I was miserable for the whole time until they figured out what it was. Good news is last lumbar puncture showed that they were able to get it out of spinal fluid. I have been on IV antibiotics but have developed allergy and had some really bad reactions. Now I'm having herxheimer reactions that are really bad, heart palpitations, short of breath, dizzy, headaches, ears ringing etc. So bad in fact during a particularly bad reaction I was apologizing to my wife for things I did 24 years ago, telling her where I had money hidden and what I wanted for the kids futures. Use the granules and treat your yard. If you lose a few bees so be it, bees are easily replaced although I don't think that will be the case. Take ticks seriously. Now there are even worse tick borne diseases like powassan showing up. You and your family's health is what is most important. I haven't been able to look at my bees in weeks. Enj. I am going to adopt your tick protocol, thanks for sharing. I never want to go through this again and certainly don't want my family to. So to recap this can be a nightmare (doesn't have to be if caught early ) do whatever it takes to kill the ticks in your area.

  19. #19
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    Alexandria, MN
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    Default Re: tick control

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    The smaller of the O'Tom ticks forks takes larval ticks off of me, pretty often. I get a lot of practice with those tiny puppies because unlike adult ticks I don't feel them prowling around on my skin.

    I'm of two minds about prophylaxis against Anaplasmosis with doxy. My infectious disease doc (a regular one, not one of those Lyme-aware guys) says that he would take the doxy if he lived in an anaplasmosis area.But since it can be transmitted in just minutes and by then it might be too late, I don't routinely do that.

    But I am, um, no spring chicken any more and as you may know Anaplasmosis is much more serious for older folks, and can lead to organ failure. Even without going far, that it was the sickest I've been in my life since I had malaria as a child. It really flattened me and required hospitalization. It put one of my neighbors in the ICU for weeks. She is lucky to have survived.

    If it takes doing extra loads of laundry to have clean tick-free clothes two, or even three, times a day, I'm OK with that.

    Enj.
    Exmar those are the nymphs. Ticks go through a life cycle. I believe they need to feed at each stage. The nymphs are noticeably smaller. I often find that it's the nymphs that will get you. They are less likley to carry disease but more likely to get a full feeding off of you.

    Enj, it's good to get your info and care from a real infectious disease doc as opposed to a "Lyme aware" doc. I applaud you for pointing that out. Those Lyme quacks are generally cashing in on paranoia. I used to work in an area in minnesota that was heavily infested with Lyme and anaplasmosis. We saw more anaplasmosis than Lyme, but I'd still see at least two cases of disseminated erythema migran per year. Plenty of regular erythema migrans, positive tests, swollen knees, and concerning symptoms. I always viewed anaplasmosis and the easier to deal with of the two. The difficulty comes with diagnosing. I could often diagnose anaplasmosis from the hallway. After a day or two of doxycycline people are right as rain. If left untreated people can get very sick, but I often found that people feel so miserable that they didn't let it go.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: tick control

    Quote Originally Posted by enjambres View Post
    I have had Lyme a couple of times, (and my husband once required a month of IV antibiotics when it got in his spinal fluid.) And anaplasmosis (a different tickborne disease) nearly killed me once, so I take ticks very seriously.
    My wife had a similar event- late diagnosis because she actually had three different issues going on at once (fibromyalgia, shingles, and Lyme). By the time the docs figured it all out it was in an advanced state- daily IVs for weeks and multiple spinal taps really sucked.

    We are surrounded by thousands of acres of woods and fields, and deer, rats and mice are abundant. We don't go to as much effort as you do as far as changing clothing, but the cats don't go out and the dog is treated regularly with something that is supposed to kill the ticks (but it doesn't always). We check frequently after being out, but often we find one roaming around inside the house without knowing if it was one of us or the dog that carried it in.

    (The cats were actually banned from going out for a different reason- we have things here that like to snack on cats and after one of our favorites disappeared the others were no longer allowed out. Later, the dog brought back the skull of a Fisher that was at least 50% larger than 'normal', while trying to identify it one guy [mistakenly] IDed it as a bear skull because it was so big. There is also a very large (and increasing) population of coyotes nearby, though they only rarely cross the creek to get to our property, one was even bold enough to come right up on the porch...and though I keep several pistols and rifles loaded and ready they tend to be much quicker than I am, I'm getting older and no longer as quick on the draw as I once was when I hunted bad guys for a living.)
    If you want to be successful, study successful people and do what they do.
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