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Thread: Trap Line

  1. #1
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    Sep 2016
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    Ronan, Montana
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    Default Trap Line

    Greetings from Montana.
    Trapping is a popular way to hunt around these parts. And most folks that do it run multiple traps and trap lines.
    If one were to run a trapline for bees how far apart would one place the traps? I suspect that there are many variables, but in general if you were going to shotgun an area 50 ft. 50 yds 500 yds etc.
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by The Walker View Post
    If one were to run a trapline for bees how far apart would one place the traps? I suspect that there are many variables, but in general if you were going to shotgun an area 50 ft. 50 yds 500 yds etc.
    100 yards. I have some that are 10 feet apart and some that are about 400 yards apart.
    David
    "Performance speaks louder than math." Michael Palmer

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by Riverderwent View Post
    100 yards. I have some that are 10 feet apart and some that are about 400 yards apart.
    Thank you for the feedback.... I have 10 traps that I made and I'm trying to figure out where to place them.... I could put 2 or 3 on our property, 1 where I work and the rest I was thinking about spreading them out along a 3 mile stretch of a canal, part of which runs through our property..
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  4. #4
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    Feb 2015
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    Rosebud Missouri
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    The walker
    I have some close to each other in a few places but I try and keep them miles apart. I pick on relitives that are close enough that I am willing to drive to. I would say I have them spread out in a 30 mile radius. 12 miles one way from my house is about my limit. I would not even go that far if I had to check them but my relitves keep an eye on them and call me when there is action. I may refreash bait if I am driving by but don't usually make a special trip to do it except in the beginning and then maby a month or two later one time.
    I don't catch too many swarms but believe I would catch fewer if I did not spread the traps pretty thin.
    Good luck
    gww
    zone 5b

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Roger that GWW.
    One question that hit me tonight is: What trips the swarm cycle?
    I.e. Here in Montana, swarm appear to start around mid-May and run through the end of June.
    So what is it? Temperature, increase of sunlight or the fact that Dairy Wueen stays open until 10 pm.
    ��
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Rockford, MI
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Population density and warmer temps. Swarm season starts when people swarm to Dairy Queen it seems. I'm sure it's a direct correlation.
    Semper Fi.

  7. #7
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    Jan 2011
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    Clackamas Oregon
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Just like trapping or fishing, space them far apart. I like a couple of miles, cities or swarm calls (they do not even have to be your calls just reports). When you get a hit you add some boxes to that grid (increase that density). Make it so that it is easy to check. I camo mine and try to make it so that I can see them from the car on the way home from work.
    “Why do we fall, sir? So that we might learn to pick ourselves up” Alfred Pennyworth Batman Begins (2005)

  8. #8
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    Sep 2016
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    Ronan, Montana
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Beeman View Post
    Population density and warmer temps. Swarm season starts when people swarm to Dairy Queen it seems. I'm sure it's a direct correlation.
    Semper Fi.
    I knew that it had to be that simple....
    USMC '70-'74
    All expense paid trip to a tropical paradise in '72-'73
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  9. #9
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    Sep 2016
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by minz View Post
    Just like trapping or fishing, space them far apart. I like a couple of miles, cities or swarm calls (they do not even have to be your calls just reports). When you get a hit you add some boxes to that grid (increase that density). Make it so that it is easy to check. I camo mine and try to make it so that I can see them from the car on the way home from work.
    Roger that! Mine are chocolate brown....
    I like the idea of checking them on the way home from work...
    That'll give me a new strategy to play with... Thank you!
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    Sacramento County, CA
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Walker,

    I have placed most of our swarm traps within 300 yards of each other. We found one "sweet spot" where we place 4 traps, all within 20 feet of each other. A number of conditions occurred that have caused us to catch more swarms in two weeks than what we have caught in years...

    I think we are up near 15 swarms caught in the last 3 or so weeks.

    What has triggered such a large number of swarms to come to our swarm traps? Not for sure certain, but here are some unusual factors:

    1. Largest rainfall in recorded history for some months and some parts of our state.
    2. Large rainfall resulted in a spectacular wild flower bloom.
    3. Some nearby beekeepers have not been managing their hives well.
    4. We are presently having a freakish Eucalyptus bloom [blue gum] that is supplying the bees even more nectar and pollen after the wild flowers died off.
    5. For the first time ever, I am trying a combo/mixture of 4 different swarm lures.
    6. Our most successful swarm traps are placed on trees, in an area that has morning sun, and strong afternoon shade.
    7. We caught absolutely zero swarms in traps placed in full sun.

    For a while, we were averaging one swarm caught per day...and some of the swarms were monster swarms [for me, the largest I have ever seen].

    So, if the bloom is on for you up there, and you have nearby beekeepers, place your traps and hope for the best!Swarm 5.15.17.jpg2017-5.jpgRedwood tree swarm 2017.jpg

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Red Bud, IL, USA
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    I personally hunt and fish (and used to trap) by condition rather than distance, I do the same with the bait hives (aka traps), though I don't like having my traps too close to compete with each other unless an area is very productive. As many have suggested, traps set where others can notify you or along a specific route (put your binoculars in the truck) are the most efficient but I still look for conditions rather than distance. Many opinions and techniques out there but the best producers for me is trees that stand apart with open branch structure, shade and for a real bonus - in sight of a water source. But just like hunting and fishing, there aren't any wrong answers as long as you're enjoying being out and looking.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  12. #12
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    Sep 2016
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    Ronan, Montana
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by Eikel View Post
    I personally hunt and fish (and used to trap) by condition rather than distance, I do the same with the bait hives (aka traps), though I don't like having my traps too close to compete with each other unless an area is very productive. As many have suggested, traps set where others can notify you or along a specific route (put your binoculars in the truck) are the most efficient but I still look for conditions rather than distance. Many opinions and techniques out there but the best producers for me is trees that stand apart with open branch structure, shade and for a real bonus - in sight of a water source. But just like hunting and fishing, there aren't any wrong answers as long as you're enjoying being out and looking.
    Some one once asked me if I hadn't anything better to do than trap and track bees.... I guess not! But ya know sitting around in a pasture ain't all that bad!
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Ronan, Montana
    Posts
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by soarwitheagles View Post
    Walker,

    I have placed most of our swarm traps within 300 yards of each other. We found one "sweet spot" where we place 4 traps, all within 20 feet of each other. A number of conditions occurred that have caused us to catch more swarms in two weeks than what we have caught in years...

    I think we are up near 15 swarms caught in the last 3 or so weeks.

    What has triggered such a large number of swarms to come to our swarm traps? Not for sure certain, but here are some unusual factors:

    1. Largest rainfall in recorded history for some months and some parts of our state.
    2. Large rainfall resulted in a spectacular wild flower bloom.
    3. Some nearby beekeepers have not been managing their hives well.
    4. We are presently having a freakish Eucalyptus bloom [blue gum] that is supplying the bees even more nectar and pollen after the wild flowers died off.
    5. For the first time ever, I am trying a combo/mixture of 4 different swarm lures.
    6. Our most successful swarm traps are placed on trees, in an area that has morning sun, and strong afternoon shade.
    7. We caught absolutely zero swarms in traps placed in full sun.

    For a while, we were averaging one swarm caught per day...and some of the swarms were monster swarms [for me, the largest I have ever seen].

    So, if the bloom is on for you up there, and you have nearby beekeepers, place your traps and hope for the best!Swarm 5.15.17.jpg2017-5.jpgRedwood tree swarm 2017.jpg
    A lot of variables indeed!!
    I have had bees come into my sugar water container from two different directions at the house... I will focus in those directions. And then I'll try places up and down an irrigation canal that runs by our place as well. I can actually drive along the canal so i'll be able to check on them from my truck...
    Thank you!
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Red Bud, IL, USA
    Posts
    964

    Default Re: Trap Line

    Some one once asked me if I hadn't anything better to do than trap and track bees.... I guess not! But ya know sitting around in a pasture ain't all that bad!
    Amen

    to paraphrase Thoreau, "some men fish their whole life and never realize the true pursuit was never the fish.
    “The single biggest problem with communication is the illusion that it has taken place.” -George Bernard Shaw

  15. #15
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    May 2015
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    Sacramento County, CA
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    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by The Walker View Post
    A lot of variables indeed!!
    I have had bees come into my sugar water container from two different directions at the house... I will focus in those directions. And then I'll try places up and down an irrigation canal that runs by our place as well. I can actually drive along the canal so i'll be able to check on them from my truck...
    Thank you!
    Walker, sounds like an excellent plan!

    Quote Originally Posted by The Walker View Post
    Some one once asked me if I hadn't anything better to do than trap and track bees.... I guess not! But ya know sitting around in a pasture ain't all that bad!
    Sitting around in a pasture can be very peaceful too! But to be 100% honest with everyone here, I do not sit around and watch our bee swarm traps. I set them up so I can have a daily glance at each one in most areas without having to hike my bottom off. I do need to use a mountain bike to check of 5 swarm traps a friend of ours recently placed in our back forest. Sure is good exercise, and I can also look for any coyote activity!

    Quote Originally Posted by Eikel View Post
    Amen

    to paraphrase Thoreau, "some men fish their whole life and never realize the true pursuit was never the fish.
    Poor Thoreau! I dislike fishing...and really love catching. For me, it is nearly 100% about catching the fish and eating the fish and that is why we have memorized fishing cycles, feeding patterns per specific season, and what works for the various fish during the various parts of the year!

    For me, a good fishing day is get in, catch, and get out! And that is what most of our fishing trips are like...

    We have often gone in, fished, caught out limit, and out within an hour or so...whereas often times, the locals are there all day long [8+ hours].

    Snow shoe fish is High Sierras, and that is me. Salmon fishing was with my dad [in pic] and was on the Feather River...

    I'll bet anything the fishing in Montana is incredible...

    021.jpg110.jpgDad Salmon 1.jpg

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Ronan, Montana
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: Trap Line

    Quote Originally Posted by soarwitheagles View Post
    Walker, sounds like an excellent plan!



    Sitting around in a pasture can be very peaceful too! But to be 100% honest with everyone here, I do not sit around and watch our bee swarm traps. I set them up so I can have a daily glance at each one in most areas without having to hike my bottom off. I do need to use a mountain bike to check of 5 swarm traps a friend of ours recently placed in our back forest. Sure is good exercise, and I can also look for any coyote activity!



    Poor Thoreau! I dislike fishing...and really love catching. For me, it is nearly 100% about catching the fish and eating the fish and that is why we have memorized fishing cycles, feeding patterns per specific season, and what works for the various fish during the various parts of the year!

    For me, a good fishing day is get in, catch, and get out! And that is what most of our fishing trips are like...

    We have often gone in, fished, caught out limit, and out within an hour or so...whereas often times, the locals are there all day long [8+ hours].

    Snow shoe fish is High Sierras, and that is me. Salmon fishing was with my dad [in pic] and was on the Feather River...

    I'll bet anything the fishing in Montana is incredible...

    021.jpg110.jpgDad Salmon 1.jpg
    Nice fish!!! I am a great fisherman.... I just don't catch anything! I love ice fishing... Just sitting out there and enjoying the quiet and the scenery.
    When I mentioned trapping and tracking bees, I wasn't talking about swarms... I was talking about individual bees and tracking them to their hive...
    In case you read, there's a book called Following the Wild Bee. You can also get the gist of the book with this video clip... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAt0pkag9YY
    SAEPE EXPERTUS, SEMPER FIDELIS, FRATRES AETERNI
    (Often Tested, Always Faithful, Brothers Forever)

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