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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Franklin, Ma
    Posts
    206

    Default Queen Rearing in Germany

    Sorry if this has been posted before but I found this extremely interesting. I was especially intrigued by the multiple use of the starter colony around 24 minutes in.

    They go through a ton of work to raise queens here. Lots of little bits of hardware at use here. Great narrator. Brings me back to my school years

    I now have a crush on Helga as well

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyzAS5eZ2xA
    Last edited by AAIndigo; 12-31-2016 at 09:30 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    bedford virginia
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Queen Rearing in Germany

    I really liked the cut cell technique

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Eisenach/ Thuringia, Germany
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Queen Rearing in Germany

    Quote Originally Posted by AAIndigo View Post
    Sorry if this has been posted before but I found this extremely interesting. I was especially intrigued by the multiple use of the starter colony around 24 minutes in.

    They go through a ton of work to raise queens here. Lots of little bits of hardware at use here. Great narrator. Brings me back to my school years

    I now have a crush on Helga as well

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyzAS5eZ2xA
    Old style... Report is dated 1992.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    Eisenach/ Thuringia, Germany
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Queen Rearing in Germany

    Quote Originally Posted by wertzsteve View Post
    I really liked the cut cell technique
    May be beginners try this kind...
    Serious breeder grafting into Nicot cups (or Jenter or other plastic cells).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    bedford virginia
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Queen Rearing in Germany

    they stated the advantage of grafting over cut cell was the saving of larva and was more economic on a large scale. on a smaller scale the cut cell technique will produce the same high quality queens as grafting. as I only have two hives, the cut cell method will produce the 5 to 10 queens that I will need this year. I going to try using a wooden cloth pin as a low tech (split cell holder)

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