Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011
Results 201 to 219 of 219
  1. #201
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    I do not know if it was mentioned by Bernhard but I have a question: to check the adjustment of the follower board you/he inspects the nest weekly, fortnightly, ...

    This aspect has a lot of relevance for me because of the impact it has on my time management.

  2. #202
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    2,513

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    I can't answer for Bernhard, but my view is that inspections should be done according to the needs of the bees. I leave my bees alone most of the winter. Preparing for winter should be done in the fall. This includes food and arrangement of the hive around the cluster. Early spring needs inspections done at least every 2 weeks to prevent swarming and detect any hive conditions that would prevent production of a crop of honey.
    NW Alabama, 47 years, 22 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  3. #203
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Portugal
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Thank you Dar.
    It was not clear in my question but I am referring to the frequency of inspections during the period of rapid nest expansion, in my area from late winter to mid-spring, when any time gain is very important in my case, and I think of many of us. Therefore in this period how often the beekeeper inspects the nest to adjust the follower board.
    If my question is not clearly stated, let me know.

  4. #204
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Posts
    287

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    In Australia, it is illegal to have hives that do not have movable frames. That cuts out some choices. What can a hive produce with movable frames. Some commercial beekeepers in Western Australia regularly produce over 300kg (660lb) and many produce over 250 kg (550lb) per hive per year so I would say movable frames do not restrict teh honey flow. Yes, it does help having a good climate and flora and no real pest and diseases.

  5. #205
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Germany, BW
    Posts
    854

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Ive read all posts in this thread and thanks to Dar, who send me the link.
    I would have avoided many mistakes if I had seen it earlier.

    Bernhard, you use "Kaltbau" or am I wrong? Ever tried "Warmbau"? I wanted to use Dadant square because of that. But so far thought it too much stress on the bees to change winter and summer arrangements.

    The 90 arrangement, do you see any disadvantage with ventilation?
    I leave the floor boards in the whole year and small entrance ( 12cm). This to have better defense.

    Please comment on this, but remember its not production of honey I go for ( no discussion about that, please), but rather resistance.

    My question about burr comb was answered in this thread. I dont want to use a queen excluder, going another path with beekeeping.
    My first mentor in bee class used 10 frames dadant without excluder and had no brood in the top supers.
    He had Carnicas and they rather swarmed than expand into the super.
    With other bees it could be splitting.
    His bees, even established, stayed in the bottom box.
    Listen to good advice, then.... make your own decision. fusion_power
    www.vivabiene.de

  6. #206
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    I want to give a hearty "Thank you," "Freundliche Gre," and all other greetings/thanks/appreciation to the posters of this thread. It has collected much in the way of observations, suggestions, solutions, and rationale for many things I've been puzzled over and have been considering doing. As a result, I will probably not make as many mistakes as I would have made.

    For instance, DarJones' summary of the MSDJ tells me that my thought of making double-medium Langstroths is probably missing the boat on some of the flexibility of square geometry and that the 12 7/8" frame size may not be exactly stupid but might need some more thought. So much information of great value is included here, and I'm only 1/3 of the way through the thread now.

    I've had a few PMs with some of the posters here, and even about these things, but didn't know of this thread until today. Thanks again. Maybe I can contribute something besides simple appreciation within a year.

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often in my youth from the late David Sebree)

  7. #207
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    In thinking through the square hive operational patterns provided by various posters, yet another question occurs to me: In the brood box which is limited to 7 frames by Bernhard's recommendations and observations, there is a large passage for bees directly into the honey super(s). Is it wise/reasonable to provide a chimney through multiple supers by using, let's say, one or two fewer frames than the box is capable of holding? This would provide an extension of the passageway from the brood box to as high in the super stack (likely only a few boxes) as one wished to provide. Can this benefit honey storage? The observation provided is that the brood box void is not filled with burr comb as long as the brood nest is properly sized. Would a passageway bounded by a follower board be left open, or blocked?

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often in my youth from the late David Sebree)

  8. #208
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    6,108

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    >Is it wise/reasonable to provide a chimney through multiple supers by using, let's say, one or two fewer frames than the box is capable of holding?

    Yikes!

  9. #209
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    2,513

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    It only works in the brood box. If you go up into the supers leaving an opening, you are asking for a free comb disaster.
    NW Alabama, 47 years, 22 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  10. #210
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Is it (believed to be) understood what response the bees are making which leaves the brood box open beyond the follower board? I certainly agree that the bees have very little in the way of reasoning (I suspect none) and respond instinctively to certain stimuli and conditions. Walt Wright made interpretations about which there is much argument concerning nectar management. Does it seem reasonable from some similarly arguable perspective that the bees might leave open the unoccupied brood box portion (which could be viewed as an extension of the hive entrance) while finding it irresistible to burr up the path to the top of the honey storage area?

    [One might offer that the bees' perspective is such a one, and that from the bees' perspective, this is reasonable. I would respond that the bees' perspective is inarguable, whereas I asked for an arguable perspective.]

    Oliver: I didn't understand the "Yikes" except as expressing shock that such an idea would occur to anyone. I am already surprised by the simple observation that large chunks of the brood box free space can remain. I see bees in my much different hive geometry drawing wax down into any void in the brood box. The interpretation I make of that is that the bees don't like the foundation I provided on the combs [correction: frames] in place, and they prefer to draw their own in an appropriate void such as where I omitted a frame. This seems to be in agreement with Matt Davey's and others' observations that open frames are more readily accepted by the bees as extensions of the brood nest than are frames with foundation. But then leaving the brood box space open stands out as a mystery.

    Has anyone actually tried leaving an open tunnel at the edge of the supers of a jumbo frame hive? It seems reasonable to attempt in response to the statement that open space beside the brood nest provides ready access to nectar storage w/o passing through the brood nest. For myself, I could only guess at the answer. It seems that a lot of beekeeping is empirical.

    This and the closely related square Dadant-ish jumbo-ish threads are really interesting. "Thank you," to the O.P.s and participants.

    Michael
    Last edited by DerTiefster; 01-16-2017 at 11:52 AM.
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often in my youth from the late David Sebree)

  11. #211
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Cullowhee Mountain, NC USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    I just wanted to say this is one of my favorite threads that beesource has to offer.
    Incredible exchange of insights, ideas and techniques with (veiled?) civility.

    Bravo bump to share.

    Doug

  12. #212
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    2,919

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    You're welcome wasabi!

  13. #213
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    492

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Quote Originally Posted by jwcarlson View Post
    I have zero interest in cutting frame parts though. I'd rather break my leg.
    If you broke your leg you'd have plenty of time to sit and make frame parts.
    Zone 5B

  14. #214
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Caldwell TX USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    A very interesting thread, it's taken me a couple of weeks to go through this whole discussion.

    For those who like having side-by-side queens, I'm curious. If 2 is better, why not 4 or 6? Has anyone ever tried putting 6 hives together? Like a 6-pack of beer?

    Call me curious.

  15. #215
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    2,513

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    There is a declining rate of return. Two or three queens side by side can be productive. There just is not much benefit from 4.

    Think of it like this. The objective is to produce a large crop of honey with minimal effort and minimum equipment. A corollary of producing large crops is that non-productive colonies have to be eliminated. It is possible to produce a large crop of honey with single queens, but this requires relatively more equipment. It is possible to produce a large crop of honey with 2 queens and they will still be productive even if one of the queens fails but they require a bit more management effort. With 3 queens, the equipment has to be modified heavily and the amount of effort required goes up significantly. From that point up, more queens require relatively more management and require even more modifications to equipment making it less efficient in either labor or equipment. The sweet spot is with either 2 or 3 queens.
    NW Alabama, 47 years, 22 colonies and growing, sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 14 frame square Dadant broodnest

  16. #216
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ojai, California
    Posts
    2,278

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    DerTiefster - just make a cork hole in the side of the honey super, don't remove a comb to make a tunnel. They know what to do. If it gets cold, or the nectar flow tapers off, plug it with a cork.

  17. #217
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Kilocharlie: Your suggestion is exactly what I would do (provide an upper entrance) if I simply wanted to provide such an entrance. I was trying to ask for anyone who had tested whether the bees would burr-comb plug such an in-hive path. It seemed a natural question given Bernhard's observation that when "appropriately managed" the bees do not fill the open area opposite the follower with burr comb. I was surprised that they did not, and was curious as to how far this behavior might carry on.

    I have made such a hive, but I was caught unexpectedly by a swarm, and placed that swarm into the 12 7/8" frame, double-medium hive. Unfortunately, it seems to have been a secondary swarm with a virgin queen. I base this on the lack of brood during its first week or more in place. Gotta get this fixed. I wanted that box to be teeming with bees ASAP, and I inadvertently appear to have blocked that option. They've been making wax and storing nectar, so I think they're not totally queenless. But I'm a newbie.

    I am an experimentalist by trade. That sometimes means I make planned mistakes, just to confirm what doesn't work. At least, that's what I tell myself.

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often in my youth from the late David Sebree)

  18. #218
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    257

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    Glad to see this thread still going. Had to catch up a bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by DerTiefster View Post
    Kilocharlie: It seemed a natural question given Bernhard's observation that when "appropriately managed" the bees do not fill the open area opposite the follower with burr comb. I was surprised that they did not, and was curious as to how far this behavior might carry on.
    My understanding is bees sometimes build burr comb in that open space, but it isn't much or it isn't a big deal to manage. Part of the reason for the bees not building much comb there is there is more ventilation in that particular part of the hive.

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Although the mesh extends all over the bottom, it gets covered with a board when not moving them. The screen provides ventilation when migrating the bees into a new location.

    The floor isn' t covered completely, lets say about 3/4 of the floor. The open pjart is below the empty space.

  19. #219
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    York County, VA, USA
    Posts
    238

    Default Re: Hive designs and their advantages and disadvantages

    A-ha! I think I had missed that part from Bernhard's posts. Now it makes (marginally) more sense. There can be a huge amount of information packed into posts from experienced folks. Sometimes it's implicit in what's not said, sometimes it is explicitly said but just not explicitly connected to important related bits.

    Michael
    "I thought I made a mistake once, but I was wrong." (heard often in my youth from the late David Sebree)

Page 11 of 11 FirstFirst ... 91011

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •