Extractor-less honey by Flow Hive - Page 4
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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    1,261

    Default Re: honey tap

    Honey Taps are what most distant family and friends think come standard with all hives...

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  3. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    52,500

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    >Will the bee know when what's behind the cap becomes empty?

    Bees have a lot of perception of what is going on. They quickly figure out the combs are empty and uncap them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  4. #63
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Sioux City, IA,USA
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: honey tap

    “Mind Blowing...It's not very often something is so revolutionary as to blow my mind...Saving 20% of harvest labor is not trivial, 40% is amazing, 60% is revolutionary. But 95%, that’s Mind Boggling!”


    Michael Bush - USA

    Author of Beekeeping Naturally and one USA’s most famous beekeepers

    Really!!!!

  5. #64
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Seven Hills, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    This is the text of the email they have just sent out:

    Thanks so much for your interest in the Flow hive. We (Cedar, Stu and our whole beekeeping family) are so excited to be letting you and the world know about the invention we have been working on for over a decade. The response has been quite overwhelming, thanks for all the amazing comments. We are working as fast as we can to complete a video that will show you all the details about the technology.

    We want to tell you a little more about the Flow frames/hives, how they work, what we think this will mean for beekeeping and where we are at with producing them.

    How do the Flow™ frames work?

    The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

    When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again which resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again. The Flow frames are inserted into standard bee supers (boxes) in much the same way as standard frames, however the box itself is modified by cutting two access doorways in one end.

    When the frames are inserted, the ends of the frames now form the end of the super. This allows access to the operating slots and honey pipe outlets.

    You can see into the hive

    Each Flow frame is designed with a unique transparent end allowing you to see into the hive. This means you can watch the bees turning nectar into honey and see when each comb is full and ready. Both children and adults get excited seeing the girls at work in their hive. Importantly you will be able to keep an eye on colony numbers thus giving you early detection of any problems within your hive.

    Please note: it’s important to check the hive for disease and look after your colony as per usual. This does require keeping an eye on your bees and opening the hive and inspecting the brood if there are signs of pests or disease. Beekeepers usually check their brood once or twice a year. If you are new to beekeeping you will need to seek help from experienced beekeepers.

    It’s a fantastic learning curve.

    The extraction process is not only easier but much faster with a flow hive

    The whole harvesting process ranges from 20 minutes to two hours depending on the viscosity of the honey.

    Usually the bees don’t even discover you at the back of the hive. If you notice that the bees have discovered the collecting jar or bucket you can always cover the extracting pipes or make a lid with a hole for the pipe/s.

    There is no more heavy lifting

    The harvesting happens right at the hive without moving the super boxes at all. No more injured backs!

    Undisturbed bees makes a happier, healthier hive

    Because the hives are not regularly opened and pulled apart to be harvested, the bees are relatively undisturbed and they experience less overall stress. Although this may seem trivial, bee stress is a significant factor contributing to the strength of a bee colony.

    Opening a hive also risks potential introduction of pests and disease. It’s nice not to squash bees in the process of honey harvesting.

    The risk of stings is lower

    Because the bees are going about their normal business while you are harvesting the honey from the back of the hive. We have found that the bees usually don’t even notice that you are there.

    We still recommend you use a bee suit or veil if you are inexperienced, don’t know the particular hive or have a grumpy hive. A hive that is usually calm can be grumpy at times when the nectar flow is very slow.

    Where to from here?

    After many years of prototypes we now have a robust design that we have been testing for the last 3 years with beekeepers here in Australia as well as in America and Canada.

    Now we want to share it with you.

    The official launch of the Flow hive is on the 23rd of February

    We are launching on the popular crowdfunding site Kickstarter.com.

    Through our launch we hope to raise the funds to get this project off the ground and start producing and delivering these hives to you within the next four months.

    Apparently, if a lot of people pledge early, then the whole thing snowballs. Conversely, if the pledging goes slowly then the project is less likely to fly. In our case we hope many people who want a Flow super to add to their beehive or who want a whole Flow beehive (the bees have to be obtained locally) will pledge on the 23rd or 24th giving us a chance to reach our target and start production.

    The early pledges get an additional ‘early bird’ discount off the already discounted price giving an extra incentive to pledge quickly.

    We’ll send you a reminder when the Kickstarter crowd-funding time begins on February 23rd, and we will be putting some more videos on our Facebook page and website soon.

    We are also making a FAQ page on our website to answer all the great questions that are flooding in.

    All the best!

  6. #65
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Trousdale County, Tennessee
    Posts
    681

    Default Re: honey tap

    I can't wait to the the actual mechanics of how this works.

  7. #66
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Strasburg, Pa, USA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    I gave them my email for more info this is a copy of the email I received today
    Hi!

    Thanks so much for your interest in the Flow hive. We (Cedar, Stu and our whole beekeeping family) are so excited to be letting you and the world know about the invention we have been working on for over a decade. The response has been quite overwhelming, thanks for all the amazing comments. We are working as fast as we can to complete a video that will show you all the details about the technology.

    We want to tell you a little more about the Flow frames/hives, how they work, what we think this will mean for beekeeping and where we are at with producing them.
    How do the Flow™ frames work?

    The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

    When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again which resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again. The Flow frames are inserted into standard bee supers (boxes) in much the same way as standard frames, however the box itself is modified by cutting two access doorways in one end.

    When the frames are inserted, the ends of the frames now form the end of the super. This allows access to the operating slots and honey pipe outlets.

    You can see into the hive

    Each Flow frame is designed with a unique transparent end allowing you to see into the hive. This means you can watch the bees turning nectar into honey and see when each comb is full and ready. Both children and adults get excited seeing the girls at work in their hive. Importantly you will be able to keep an eye on colony numbers thus giving you early detection of any problems within your hive.

    Please note: it’s important to check the hive for disease and look after your colony as per usual. This does require keeping an eye on your bees and opening the hive and inspecting the brood if there are signs of pests or disease. Beekeepers usually check their brood once or twice a year. If you are new to beekeeping you will need to seek help from experienced beekeepers.

    It’s a fantastic learning curve.

    The extraction process is not only easier but much faster with a flow hive

    The whole harvesting process ranges from 20 minutes to two hours depending on the viscosity of the honey.

    Usually the bees don’t even discover you at the back of the hive. If you notice that the bees have discovered the collecting jar or bucket you can always cover the extracting pipes or make a lid with a hole for the pipe/s.

    There is no more heavy lifting

    The harvesting happens right at the hive without moving the super boxes at all. No more injured backs!

    Undisturbed bees makes a happier, healthier hive

    Because the hives are not regularly opened and pulled apart to be harvested, the bees are relatively undisturbed and they experience less overall stress. Although this may seem trivial, bee stress is a significant factor contributing to the strength of a bee colony.

    Opening a hive also risks potential introduction of pests and disease. It’s nice not to squash bees in the process of honey harvesting.

    The risk of stings is lower

    Because the bees are going about their normal business while you are harvesting the honey from the back of the hive. We have found that the bees usually don’t even notice that you are there.

    We still recommend you use a bee suit or veil if you are inexperienced, don’t know the particular hive or have a grumpy hive. A hive that is usually calm can be grumpy at times when the nectar flow is very slow.
    Where to from here?

    After many years of prototypes we now have a robust design that we have been testing for the last 3 years with beekeepers here in Australia as well as in America and Canada.

    Now we want to share it with you.

    The official launch of the Flow hive is on the 23rd of February

    We are launching on the popular crowdfunding site Kickstarter.com.

    Through our launch we hope to raise the funds to get this project off the ground and start producing and delivering these hives to you within the next four months.

    Apparently, if a lot of people pledge early, then the whole thing snowballs. Conversely, if the pledging goes slowly then the project is less likely to fly. In our case we hope many people who want a Flow super to add to their beehive or who want a whole Flow beehive (the bees have to be obtained locally) will pledge on the 23rd or 24th giving us a chance to reach our target and start production.

    The early pledges get an additional ‘early bird’ discount off the already discounted price giving an extra incentive to pledge quickly.

    We’ll send you a reminder when the Kickstarter crowd-funding time begins on February 23rd, and we will be putting some more videos on our Facebook page and website soon.

    We are also making a FAQ page on our website to answer all the great questions that are flooding in.

    All the best!

    Stu and Cedar Anderson

  8. #67
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    5,326

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    It says how it works, but here's how I envisioned it. The comb is not solid, when you turn the crank it moves the pieces which open the cells on the bottom side only and the honey drains out that way. Turn the crank back to reset and reseal. I figured they used a membrane or something as the bottom of the cell before reading this where you could put a vaccuum on the inside of the frame to pull the honey out through the membrane but this is even simpler. I will try one just to support the company and see how it works, even if it's just a novelty or a way for my landowners to go get their own honey for a change...

  9. #68
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    4,323

    Default Re: Flow Hive- this look interesting

    Laughed my rear off as soon as I saw it!

  10. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,329

    Default Re: Flow Hive- this look interesting

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr.Beeman View Post
    Laughed my rear off as soon as I saw it!
    me too.

  11. #70
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    moravia,ny
    Posts
    2,095

    Default Re: Flow Hive- this look interesting

    wait until a frame granulates and ya have to figure out what to do next. at least the inventers are smart enough to get other people do the investing. lol

  12. #71
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    5,957

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    Regarding a similar setup here:
    http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2014/...tcmp=obnetwork

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I don't believe it exists nor has it ever had bees in it. Obviously it is designed by someone who knows virtually nothing about bees. A flower for them to forage on? A spigot for the honey? It is ridiculous.
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ve+kitchen+tap

    Would be pretty darn cool if it works though.

  13. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Byron Bay, New South Wales, Australia
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    Hi all, I'm a friend of the inventors, we've just put up a FAQs page to try and answer some of your questions:
    http://www.honeyflow.com/faqs/p/22

    There's a heap of info there, our biggest issue right now it dealing with demand, its totally blown us all away, so we can't possibly reply to all emails, we're doing all we can to keep people updated until the big reveal, Feb 23 on Kickstarter.

    As Michael says, its already fully operational and in limited production, I dare say (not sure though) that Michael's frames might even be an earlier prototype to the one being made now. Cedar and Stu do love to tinker with getting it just right.

    Yari

    ---

    What are Flow™ frames?
    “Flow™” is the name for our new invention that allows honey to be harvested directly from the hive without opening the hive and with little disturbance to the bees. The Flow frames are the beehive frames that make this possible.

    What is a Flow™ Hive?
    A Flow Hive is our term for a standard beehive using a brood box with one or more Flow Supers for honey storage and extraction. A honeybee hive is usually made up two boxes; the brood box where the queen bee lays eggs, and the ‘super’ with honeycomb for the storage of honey. A ‘Flow Super’ is a beehive box using Flow Frames that the bees store honey in.

    How do the Flow™ frames work?
    The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

    When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again in the upper slot resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again.

    How do I stop the bees getting to the honey while it’s draining out of the Flow hive?
    Quite often we can drain the honey out without the bees even noticing us at the back of the hive but sometimes they do and you will need to cover the the jars or better still, make a sealed system. This can be achieved by simply by making a hole in the lid of a jar for a tube to go into. Or if you are using a bucket, you can put many holes through the lid of a bucket or make up a manifold.

    Do I need a Flow box for the brood box too?
    No, the brood box stays the same as it always has been. You can simply replace the honey supers on a standard beehive with one or more Flow Supers.

    Can I fit the Flow frames into my existing beehives?
    We want this to be as affordable as possible so we have designed it so you can use your own boxes. The Flow frames are designed to fit Langstroth size deep boxes and are inserted into standard bee supers (boxes) in much the same way as standard frames. The box itself is slightly modified by cutting two access doorways in one end. When the frames are inserted, the ends of the frames now form the end of the super. This allows access to the operating slots and honey pipe outlets.

    Does the Flow Super fit an 8 or 10 frame Langstroth hive?
    The flow frames will fit either an 8 or 10 frame Langstroth. A full “8 frame, deep” Super would take six Flow frames, and the 10 frame super would take 7 Flow frames as they are wider than traditional frames. It is also possible to have a combination of traditional Langstroth frames and Flow frames in the one Super.

    Can I put a Flow Super on a UK National?
    Yes, this can be done in two ways:
    1/ Use an adaptor from UK National to Langstroth size box. This can be made or bought so that the more common Langstroth size box can be used.
    2/ The Flow frames are available in lengths to suit a UK national. Eight Flow frames fit across a UK national box. However UK National boxes and frames have different depths than Langstroth. The box walls height can be adjusted by adding a strip of wood to the bottom of the box.

    Can I put a Flow Super on a top bar hive?
    Yes and it will be up to you as to how to adapt and join the two. As long as the bees have good access to the Flow frames and sense that they are a part of their hive they will fill them with honey.

    Do the bees willingly fill the Flow comb compared to the traditional wax comb?
    In many years of testing we have found the bees readily wax up and fill the Flow frames. We have done quite a few experiments putting Flow frames in the middle of a standard supers with wax foundation frames either side. The bees have shown no preference either way and readily start building on, and filling the Flow frames at the same time as the traditional ones.

    How long does it take before I can drain the honey from the Flow hive?
    This depends on the amount of nectar available for the bees and how strong the colony is. We have had Flow Supers that have filled in a week during peak times of the flowering season, however a super usually fills well within a month during the spring and summer.

    How long does it take for the honey to drain out?
    Anything from twenty minutes to over two hours depending on the temperature and the viscosity of the honey. It is OK to leave it draining overnight (if it is secure from nocturnal animals). When you have finished draining the honey remember to return the frames to ‘cell closed’ position so that the bees can seal the broken cells and recommence filling them with more honey.

    How much honey comes out of a Flow super?
    About three kilos per frame (more if the bees really build each frame out), if you have seven frames in your super box then you can expect to harvest at least 20 kilos when every frame is full.

    Can the Flow frames come out of the super, like the standard frames do?
    Yes. This is important for inspections and because this is how most hives in the world work. However there is no need for this in the normal operations of extracting honey.

    What extra equipment will I need to get the honey?
    You will need a container to collect your honey. You will also need some pipe to connect your jar or bucket to the honey drain points on the hive. You will also need a bee suit and gloves or at least a bee veil in case your bees get aggressive. You will also need to open the hive to inspect it for health as usual which you will need a bee suit, smoker and hive tool for. If you are new to beekeeping you should link up with an experienced beekeeper to get to know how to care for your bees.

    How do I know when to harvest/drain the hive?
    The ends of the Flow frames are visible by taking the cover off one end of the hive box. It is worth having a look at the bees regularly through this window as you’ll get to know your hive and it doesn’t disturb the bees. You will see the bees depositing honey in the cells and, when the cells are full, they seal them with a wax capping. You can rob a frame as soon as you see that it is full, although there is no hurry, the sealed honey will keep until it is convenient for you to drain it out of the hive.

    Do I need to smoke the hive?
    No, not when you are operating the flow comb or just viewing the bees. Smoke is usually used to calm the bees when the hive is opened. However, bees do react to the hive being jolted so it’s a good idea to have a smoker on hand in case the bees do start getting aggressive. A little smoke puffed into the entrance of the hive and some puffed around the hive itself will tend to calm them down. You will still need a smoker to do the routine inspection of the brood nest.

    Do I need to wear a bee suit, bee veil or gloves when I drain the honey out?
    We do recommend you wear a bee protective suit, especially if you are new to beekeeping or have a new, unknown hive. Some beekeepers just use a veil as being stung on the face - particularly up the nose is painful and inconvenient!

    We have found we can work at the back of the hive without the bees seeming to notice our presence, however we highly recommend that you wear a bee suit or at least a veil until you get to know your bees. Sometimes, for many reasons, bees can be quite aggressive so you need to be prepared for that.

    After a few inspections you will know whether it is safe to approach your hives without any protection.

    Is there a best time of day to rob the hive using Flow?
    It is possible to harvest a Flow hive at any time of the day or night because the hive is not opened. There is not the concern of chilling or disturbing the bees on cold or windy days.

    We have found the bees are calmest in the late afternoon, and at this time the honey in the hive is likely to be warmest and runs easily, therefore we tend to rob at this time.

    How often do I need to check the brood?
    This depends on your location. In our area it is normal to inspect the brood nest of each hive twice a year for disease. In some areas beekeepers check more frequently. If the hive is weak it should also be inspected. Our invention changes the honey harvesting component of beekeeping. All the rest of the normal beekeeping care for the hive still applies. Beetles, mites swarm control etc. The flow hive clear end frame observation does assist with allowing you to look into the hive and gauge the strength and health of the colony.

    How many Flow boxes (supers) do I need per hive?
    One Flow super per hive is the simple answer as you can keep tapping off the honey which gives the bees room to keep working and making more honey. However if you live in areas with a very high nectar flow or if your existing beehives are particularly large we would recommend you use two Flow supers or more. The Flow hive is new and we are interested in your feedback as to how many Flow supers you need in your situation

    Do I need to leave some honey in the hive for the bees?
    Yes, this applies to all beekeeping, your bees need honey to get them through the times when there is no nectar available. The number of frames of honey that you leave depends on your climate, you should consult local beekeepers as to how much they leave their colonies over the winter. The Flow frames make it a lot easier to see how much honey is in your frames at any time, so you can learn to manage how much honey to harvest and how much to leave for the bees. Watching the honey level change everyday is quite fascinating and I personally feel more in touch with the bees and cant help but look on a daily basis. You can also take just a small amount of honey if you choose, by draining one frame or part of a frame. Some Beekeepers do feed sugar syrup to their bees to help them get through the cold winter months. They rarely use honey for feeding as this could spread disease and is a lot more expensive than sugar.

  14. #73
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Washington, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    Again, I ask is this "natural"?
    It's a great novel concept--well not novel, as others have thought of it before--but at least these guys spent time, effort and money to make it happen.
    Here's the problem: The media's outpouring of misinformation the past 10 years since the first reports of CCD (??) have gotten a lot, and I mean a lot, of people interested in honeybees. Many have good intentions to become beekeepers to help repopulate the world with bees. However, many of these people jump into getting bees, because it "looks easy to do it naturally." They don't understand the amount of work and management that goes into keeping "domesticated livestock." Somehow, they want to ignore that last statement. This is one more gadget, although neat in design, that will allow people to "keep bees more easily" but it will further remove people from taking responsibility, putting in the time, and understanding that bees require work. And it's being marketed to these people with the "it stresses the bees less" line.
    They are quick to point out all the benefits, and yes there are some, without pointing out all the issues that we all as beekeepers know will occur.
    Hey, maybe I'll patent the idea of making one of these into an observation hive with a few modifications so it can sit on the kitchen table and we won't have to walk as far to get the honey for our pancakes........
    Tim Wilbanks
    Kalona Honey Company, LLC www.kalonahoney.com

  15. #74
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,944

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    Are any hives that are manipulated by man natural? What does that even mean?

  16. #75
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    52,500

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    >Author of Beekeeping Naturally and one USA’s most famous beekeepers

    The first part is definitely true.

    >Again, I ask is this "natural"?

    I think it's obvious that anything plastic in a hive is not natural. As most any useful thing in beekeeping it has to work with the bees natural instincts.

    >wait until a frame granulates and ya have to figure out what to do next

    I thought of that. But I only rarely have that problem now and it's mostly because I wait until it turns cold to harvest. With this I would harvest early and often so it's less likely to happen. However, if it did, I'd probably treat it like I treat the HSC and PermaComb. Uncap it with a hackler honey punch and extract it. Then you could rinse it in reasonably hot water and put it back in the hive.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 42y 40h 39yTF

  17. #76
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    lee county, fl, usa
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    1,173

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    After reading all the posts, I think it sounds incredible, and extremely possible. I am excited because I often worry about what happens when I get too old to lift hives/supers (when I go back to hobbyist) and still want to keep bees? I see this as a very nice way of not interfering with the bees and still get honey. Many of my questions were answered in post #70 and Michael's #79 post. He is after all, my favorite most famous beekeeper.
    Pleasant words are a honeycomb, sweet to the soul and healing to the bones. Prvb 16:24
    March 2010; +/- 50 hives, TF

  18. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
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    Rosebud Missouri
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    2,965

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    Micheal
    You run unlimited brood nest. I am a untried (dumb) bee keeper, as I have never done it.
    Are their any worries of pollen or brood in the flow frames? Also, will the expence of the frames be low enough to replace the labor factor and do they seem durable for long term use? Will you be using a queen excluder now?
    Thanks
    gww

  19. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
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    2,208

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    I agree that if Michael has tried it and liked it it probably worked.
    The question will be the cost of setting up or converting. Also it will be interesting to see how many seasons the system is reusable for.
    Personally I would love to try it. Shipping hives from Australia to Canada will only serve to increase the cost.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  20. #79
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Hanover, PA
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    This is a pretty cool idea, but I will be curious to see how far this makes it. I believe that it would be neat to own one as something new and different, but I'm not sure how practical these would be on a large scale operation.

  21. #80
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    Apr 2013
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    Vancouver, BC, Canada
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    2,208

    Default Re: Extractor-less honey by- "Honey Flow"

    If they work well I would expect they would be much more practical than collecting frames, getting bees off them, transporting to a honey house, uncapping the frames, extracting the frames and transporting them back to the hives, again opening the hives and replacing the supers. The commercial folk pay people to do that. Much simpler to send someone out to set a bucket, turn a knob and return later to turn the knob and collect the honey. On a large operation by the time you finish opening the tap on the last hive you would likely be able to go back to hive one and shut off the knob and put the collected honey on the truck. The only lifting is grtting the honey from the hive onto the truck.


    Quote Originally Posted by IsedHooah View Post
    This is a pretty cool idea, but I will be curious to see how far this makes it. I believe that it would be neat to own one as something new and different, but I'm not sure how practical these would be on a large scale operation.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

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