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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Beaver bank NS Canada
    Posts
    3

    Default Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Bought three nucs late in 2011, got all through winter, tried a couple of splits, entered 2012 winter with three hives I emerged with two, entered 2013 with four emerged with three, since I'd already ordered five queens, requeened did early split and went to pollination with four strong hives. Then deciding to up my game, bought four queens and did splits, all was on track but not for long. I understand the queen rules but: the four doner hives were placed in two yards miles apart (urban) in each yard one exploded and one did nothing! In each case one has four or five honey supers and the other is trying to fill the second box, maybe you folks can put my mind at ease with some info I can get my head around. Second part; the four newly queened splits(June 20th) have been very slow but have filled 85percent of two mediums and convinced me to add another, today(25 aug) inspections show a dismal population compared to last inspection some eight days ago but still lots of eggs and various stages of brood- not great but pretty good-no where near winter survival here in NS Canada. At a loss as to when I should 1) combine. 2) resource level 3) feed and pray 4) go on vacation. Appreciate any thoughts you could share

    Tks
    Dusty-don

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,999

    Default Re: Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Dusty is it possible to post a pic of the brood from one of the hives that is suffering? The state of the brood can often show problems, otherwise there is little to guide as to what the problem might be.

    Other thing, you went to pollination with 4 hives? Just curious, you can actually do that where you are how do you get such contracts? Here, a person needs at least a truckload of bees before anyone would be interested in renting your hives.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Beaver bank NS Canada
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Dusty is it possible to post a pic of the brood from one of the hives that is suffering? The state of the brood can often show problems, otherwise there is little to guide as to what the problem might be.

    Other thing, you went to pollination with 4 hives? Just curious, you can actually do that where you are how do you get such contracts? Here, a person needs at least a truckload of bees before anyone would be interested in renting your hives.
    Thanks Oldtimer, I will attempt adding some pics. Let me say that after the pic taking this pm the activity around the nuc was wild leading me to believe they are being robbed large scale, it has been very dry here for some time.
    Here in Nova Scotia the shortage of bees is a problem, the big guys get the truck loads, the little guys love us little guys the folks I dealt with this year have already asked me to remember them next year, should I survive winter and will take all I can supply, hoping for more.
    Pics ---here goes
    Attached Images Attached Images

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,999

    Default Re: Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Hmm well I wish I could say what it was but I can't.

    On the face of it, although there are some AFB'ish looking cells, I don't think the hive died of AFB because there are not enough numbers of dead sunken caps that AFB would have left. Can't say for sure without looking at the real comb, but it doesn't look like it.

    It is consistent with mite damage but clarity of the pic is not enough to say for sure. The larvae do look how they look when killed by mites and associated viruses, and there is also what appears to be mite poops in some cells. But picture definition is not enough to say for sure.

    Then there's heaps of other possibilities from poisoning to whatever, but these cannot be diagnosed accurately like this. My suggestion would be have a sample tested at a lab, my money would be that mites are involved. Too late for these bees but if the lab can give you the cause you will be forearmed for next season.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,546

    Default Re: Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Were the queens all the same or did you get two duds and two good ones?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    477

    Default Re: Now I'm totally at odds with myself

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Were the queens all the same or did you get two duds and two good ones?
    This was my first thought. Several times I have setup "identical" splits with new queens from the same source or different sources only to see vastly different performance. If we can winter in Ontario with a well fed single deep hive, I would think that you would be able to winter a double medium if you fed it well. I would do an alcohol wash or your preferred mite check to see if they are your problem as OT indicated.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

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