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Thread: To make it real

  1. #61
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,116

    Default Re: To make it real

    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    You return extracted supers back to the hives and give equally many boxes on each hive?
    Essentially. I try to keep a minimum of five deeps (or seven mediums) on each hive at all times. It's a truly unlimited broodnest. Eventually some hives will excel and they will get more boxes. But after harvest the empty comb goes back on the hives more or less evenly. No storing comb, no moth problems, no chemicals to stop moth problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Have you selected the best 12 hives, in the picture, to make a crop in some flower field, given them all max number of boxes, bring them to home yard after harvesting?
    There are 14 in the picture, but that is the home yard for now. I just moved and have not gotten everything to the optimal state. Normally I'd have ~24 hives and some nucs as well, but I slimmed down so I could move them 800+ miles (1300 km). But that is more or less the normal configuration.


    Quote Originally Posted by Juhani Lunden View Post
    Sure you don´t leave them 8 boxes high in the winter storms in the middle of a field?
    Yes, I do. I have never had one blown over in up to 40 mph (65 kph) winds. However, the winds may be higher here so I'm going to build a wind blocking fence.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    48,848

    Default Re: To make it real

    >the winds may be higher here so I'm going to build a wind blocking fence.

    Two issues with where you are now: winds will gust to 65 mph sometimes. The wind is relentless. I thought it was relentless in Nebraska, but after living in Laramie, I realize I didn't know what relentless was... If you have brand new boxes with no propolis between them yet, you need a concrete block on top to keep the wind from gradually moving the boxes...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,116

    Default Re: To make it real

    They all have pretty decent blocks on top. And I'm not leaving huge open entrances on them this year. I'm thinking of putting a piece of plywood up as a snow fence, block the worst of the wind.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Romania, Sibiu
    Posts
    373

    Default Re: To make it real

    A poorly constructed wind fence can be worse then nothing. I've once had a wide piece of metal sheet blowing just above my had .
    Dfa (Humid continental warm summer climate)

  5. #65
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canterbry, UK
    Posts
    2,022

    Default Re: To make it real

    My stands are arranged in paired groups of 4, making 8 in most images

    The swarms and cut-outs are simply spread out.

    There about 60 colonies shown here. I've included a clip of yesterday's Guardian colour supplement so you see which are current.

    The bees are not flying today, so I've included some photos few weeks old showing them present. If any of you gents would like to identify a hive at random, I'll be happy to pop the top off and show you the occupants. (But of course I could have just swapped them in.)

    I've included a few recent photos showing swarms being collected, a swarm flying in to an empty hive etc to try to fill out the picture a bit more. I can add images of my (modest and homespun) equipment, processing etc.

    Insulting doesn't begin to describe this. I've honestly described my circumstances for the last 5 years, with my full name attached. The only people who would doubt that are people who lie themselves; people who can't recognise honesty even after 5 years.

    Proof B1 & 2.JPG
    Stands B1 & 2

    Proof B3 & 4.JPG
    Stands B3 & 4

    Proof M2 &1.JPG
    Stands M1 & 2

    Proof M4, 3 & swarms.JPG
    Stands M3 &4

    Proof M5 & 6.JPG
    Stands M5 & 6

    Proof M7 & 8.JPG
    Stand M7 & 8

    Proof M9.JPG
    Stand M9

    Proof Swarms.JPG
    2015 Swarms & Cutouts

    HomeSwarmsmall2.jpg
    Home Swarm (Fly-in)

    Flying Small.jpg
    Flying Bees

    Horse & Drones Small.jpg
    Red Pollen & Drones
    The race isn't always to the swift, nor the fight to the strong, but that's the way to bet

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,994

    Default Re: To make it real

    Good pics, wish I could get some nice flat sites like that!

  7. #67

    Default Re: To make it real

    Thanks for the pictures. Makes things more real to me.

    But why the heck do you place your hives right into a commercial fruit orchard? Right on the glyphosate-treated ground? With all the spraying you won't make life easier for your bees. Especially when there is no other nectar source despite the fruit trees! You refuse to use varroacides and then place your bees right into the most pesticide contaminated environment I can think of. That is a bit paradox, isn't it?

    Greetings,

    Bernhard

  8. #68
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canterbry, UK
    Posts
    2,022

    Default Re: To make it real

    Quote Originally Posted by BernhardHeuvel View Post
    Thanks for the pictures. Makes things more real to me.

    But why the heck do you place your hives right into a commercial fruit orchard? Right on the glyphosate-treated ground? With all the spraying you won't make life easier for your bees. Especially when there is no other nectar source despite the fruit trees! You refuse to use varroacides and then place your bees right into the most pesticide contaminated environment I can think of. That is a bit paradox, isn't it?

    Greetings,

    Bernhard
    Hi Bernhard,

    It wasn't an easy decision, but the chance to make up to £3000 annually in pollinations fees swung it. Also, as well as the 100s of acres of fruit the sites have good access to all sorts of other things - some potentially bad, but some very good indeed. The flowers aren't sprayed with insecticides (though they are sprayed with fungicides) - the fruit farmers do their best to protect pollinators, and I'm hoping to be able to help them fine-tune. Its an experiment, and I'm hopeful good will come of it on lots of different levels. I'll be comparing performance with other much more natural sites in due course.

    There's no paradox though. The objection to varroacides is that they are genetically addictive. None of the other chemicals present that hazard.

    Mike (UK)
    The race isn't always to the swift, nor the fight to the strong, but that's the way to bet

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Suffolk, NY, USA
    Posts
    1,099

    Default Re: To make it real

    your arguments, hardline tf/survivor approach and judgement of other beekeepers and their methods is now in serious doubt.
    Thanks for the pictures, sure put things in perspective for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by mike bispham View Post
    Hi Bernhard,

    It wasn't an easy decision, but the chance to make up to £3000 annually in pollinations fees swung it. Also, as well as the 100s of acres of fruit the sites have good access to all sorts of other things - some potentially bad, but some very good indeed. The flowers aren't sprayed with insecticides (though they are sprayed with fungicides) - the fruit farmers do their best to protect pollinators, and I'm hoping to be able to help them fine-tune. Its an experiment, and I'm hopeful good will come of it on lots of different levels. I'll be comparing performance with other much more natural sites in due course.

    There's no paradox though. The objection to varroacides is that they are genetically addictive. None of the other chemicals present that hazard.

    Mike (UK)

  10. #70
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canterbry, UK
    Posts
    2,022

    Default Re: To make it real

    Quote Originally Posted by clyderoad View Post
    your arguments, hardline tf/survivor approach and judgement of other beekeepers and their methods is now in serious doubt.
    In what way/s? Is it the case that you formed a view of what I do without actually bothering to find out what I do?

    Mike (UK)
    The race isn't always to the swift, nor the fight to the strong, but that's the way to bet

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Scott county, Arkansas, Usa
    Posts
    291

    Default Re: To make it real

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Oh I know it's you Solomon. Despite being carefully concealed the few features visible have Solomon Parker written all over them LOL. Don't know why the thread has taken such a negative twist from the intent of the original post.

    Here is a New Zealand crew ready for action


    But seriously why so shy everyone? You gotta look better and smarter than my NZ crew!
    I don't see how anyone could look at those faces and not grin.

    Thanks, Alex
    Ten years of Beekeeping before varroa. Started again spring of 2014. Going for treatment free.

  12. #72

    Default Re: To make it real

    I want to remind all posters, that the OP requested photos of the BEEKEEPER and his/her bees, TOGETHER in the same picture.

    I know it takes guts.
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

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