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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Maryville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4

    Default The joys of buckwheat

    During these late summer months in East Tennessee, we typically think there is not much available for the bees as far as sources of nectar and pollen.

    That doesn’t have to be the case.If you have any kind of a garden (or just an open area), buckwheat can provide great benefits for your bees and your soil. Buckwheat can be sown at any time during warm weather. Ideally, it takes three to four weeks to come up (sometimes longer, depending on the weather), and produces a small white flower that the bees love. . . .

    I've posted a bit more about this here:

    http://blountbees.wordpress.com/2014...ugust-meeting/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Fair Grove,MO,USA
    Posts
    1,665

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    I plant an acre of buckwheat every year, once it comes up it will bloom in 26 days. I can get 3 blooms a year from one planting by running over it with a disc after it goes to seed. The bees will work it in the mourning up till 11:00am and after that you won't see a bee on it. Like now in my area there is a dearth on and buckwheat, vitex, moon flowers,and some dutch clover is the only things that i'm aware of that they have to work, the sumac flow is over in my area.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    903

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Here's a quick video I did on my buckwheat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rlG_...DATt5CampP4RtA

    Mine aren't working it too hard yet, but I'm thinking they might once it stops raining.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Maryville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Thanks for the video, Rod.

    Glad to know what someone else has discovered buckwheat for the bees.

    Here's my video, similar to yours, but not as informative:

    http://youtu.be/ycVUgtogbXo?list=UUs...JSfIK0lq2OaAgQ

    Jim

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    My wife scattered some this spring to see what it would do. We have a few stalks here and there but no concentrations. Last week we established a new flower bed (about 100 square feet) with some very rich dirt. Another bed with this dirt seemed to grow particularly vigorous buckwheat, so that's what we planted in the new bed.

    I've not even looked at when you can plant it ... think we'll see anything in a month?

    We've got mountain mint blooming ,,, acres of it ... and the girls seem delighted with it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Manning, SC
    Posts
    2,478

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    When I planted buckwheat, each morning the dragon flies would just hover over it waiting for their breakfast...........my honeybees!
    http://OxaVap.com Your source for the Varrox Mite Killing
    OA Vaporizer "One of the highest ranked" by R. Oliver

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Maryville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    I've had buckwheat come up within four days of planting. It needs water and warm weather, I think.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Washington Parish Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    snl, you need some Purple Martins, they love dragon flies.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    I invested in a used seed drill this year. I drilled my first acre of buckwheat on June 28. It came up beautifully and continues to bloom and grow. Today is the first day we have had any serious rain since then. I planted my second acre 2 weeks later. Got a very poor stand, only about 50% came up. Planted my third acre 2 weeks after the second. It is even worse, maybe 5% stand. It was bone dry when I planted it. The key is to drill it down to the moisture. Next year I think I will plant it all the last week in June. I love it. Like Brooks Bee Farm stated, they only work it in the morning. I have planed it in past years by broadcasting it and then running the cultipacker over it but the drill really works great.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Ours started germinating within a week, with 1/4 inch of rain. I emptied a rain barrel on the beds and in two days it was coming up like crazy. Should rain there tomorrow and Wednesday.

    I wish I had room to plant by the acre. All we have room for is a taste. Fortunately we have lots of native forage.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Vermontville, Michigan
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Buckwheat is fantastic for the bees, and grows in just about any soil conditions, without having to do too much in the way of soil additives.

    I planted buckwheat for the first time last year, and did one planting, then this year I've done two and the second has just started to go to seed, so I'll be planting again within the next week. I've planted clover for 3 years as well. What I do for both (and have had great luck with) for my first planting of the year is to mow the entire area to about 4 inches (I like to stay high enough to avoid grounding my mower blades), wait 2-3 days, and then spray with roundup. I give that 7-10 days and then till it all up. If I'm breaking a new plot, I will wait 3-4 days until I start seeing grass sprouting up, and then spray it again. If it's an old plot, I'll skip the extra spraying and broadcast the seed directly after I till, then run over every inch of it with tractor, mower, or truck to press the seed in.
    For subsequent plantings within the same year, I just mow, till, broadcast, and pack.
    I get great stands of buckwheat, and my clover is fantastic as well.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    It sure seems to like "bat dirt". Some cavers have been mucking out a small cave near here, and giving away the very rich dirt that they haul out. Several of us have it in our gardens, and it is really productive. We noticed the few stray seeds my wife dropped there were the healthiest looking buckwheat plants.

    A friend has planted an acre and a half.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Collinsville, VA
    Posts
    447

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    BerkeyDavid, is that acreage enough to generate a surplus of buckwheat honey?
    6 yrs. 16 Hives T Zone 7a

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    bridgton maine
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    DO ANY OF YOU FOLKS put on a winter cover cover over the buckwheat. planted some last spring and still going strong but starting to seed now. I would like to get a good cover crop started- thinking winter rye in mid September just to improve poor soils. any ideas? soil is gravelly loam with good amount of granite dust from well drilling, and some cow manure mixed in. thanks

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,963

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Winter Rye is allelopathic - meaning it will keep other things from growing for a few weeks after you turn it under in the spring. This shouldn't discourage you from planting it - just be aware of this and make your time plans accordingly.

    Where in Bridgton are you located? I spent many summers as a youth on Moose Pond.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    1,264

    Default Re: The joys of buckwheat

    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Dewey View Post
    Winter Rye is allelopathic - meaning it will keep other things from growing for a few weeks after you turn it under in the spring. This shouldn't discourage you from planting it - just be aware of this and make your time plans accordingly.

    Where in Bridgton are you located? I spent many summers as a youth on Moose Pond.
    Thats good to know Andrew, I am planning on planting something as a green field for the game to hold my annual land over. Is that the case if it is poisoned prior to disking under as well? I am thinking oats this year. Does that apply to them? I used rye last year but planted at 1/3 harvest rate for cover on my perrenials . But plan on planting winter greens( wheat,rye, or oats) on all annual plots for winter cover in the future. That is great to know. Thanks. G

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