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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Fort Wright Kentucky USA
    Posts
    14

    Default Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    Hi, I'm very new to beekeeping and have only just built my first hive a TBH. My question stems from the fact that i have two different active hives living at two differnt friends houses. One is in a Cistern and one is in a wall of a shed. Neither is in any hury to have the bees removed and are willing to wait for me to be ready to try to capture them. I still haven't bought a bee suit or most of the tools because i figured i would have until next spring to even need them, but with finding these two hives i need to know if i should just order the stuff now and capture them right away or is it too late and i should wait?

    Thanks for your help

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Shreveport, Louisiana, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    "[I] need to know if i should just order the stuff now and capture them right away or is it too late and i should wait?"
    I would order and proceed. Smoke them modestly but consistently for twenty minutes or so to give them time to eat honey prior to beginning removal. Carefully keep some of the uncapped brood to anchor them. Feed them back their own honey generously inside the top bar hive after they have settled in. I hope it goes well for you. Cheers,
    Aren't they supposed to be the ones feeding me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    1,495

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    In my opinion not too late. The ideal time would be during the middle of the main flow. This time of year they can be a bit testy. Recomend using a vac if the hives have any size to them

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    967

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    Since your friends are willing to wait, and it is late in the season, it might be best to wait until spring. IMO, it would be very difficult to build back up before winter sets in.


    Shane

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,838

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    I agree with tsmullins. I am only a short distance from you, and I normally stop trapouts, and cutouts the 15th of July, unless it is an elimination trapout/cutout, and the owner will not wait until Spring.

    In a cutout there is a lot of mess for the bees to clean up, knit comb together, and prepare for Winter. A really good honey flow is a plus in a cutout/trapout. While there are plants blooming now, there is not a lot of nectar available. I would be careful about saving a lot of honey and placing in a hive from a cutout this time of year. The bees will put their priority in knitting the brood comb together and caring for brood. Dripping honey from too much honey comb saved, can be a big mess. I can doom your cutout.

    I would wait until Spring, if at all possible.

    cchoganjr

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Fort Wright Kentucky USA
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    Thanks for all your input everyone. I already lost one of those hives. I went to check it out yesterday and it turned out to be yellow jackets in the cistern. I plan to check out the one in the wall sometime this week. That buddy tells me its definitely bees and there is honey, but we shall see when i get there. At this point (assuming there are bees in that wall) I'm leaning toward waiting till spring to get them out. i've been reading on here and some other sites and i'm starting to feel like i might need more knowledge before tackling a cut out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    St. Petersburg, fl, USA
    Posts
    186

    Default Re: Is there a bad time to capture a hive?

    Here in Florida we don't have the wintering problems you do. I would wait until spring. The population will be at its lowest so it will be easier to work. Use this time to build or buy a bee vac and get your gear together.When you do the cut out do not try to keep too much brood. The bees need some to anchor but too much can cause problems for the bees if you damage a lot cutting it out. It is okay to give them a little of their honey but when you first hive them keep them closed up for twenty for hours so that they clean up any drips. other wise you may attract robbers.

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