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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, IN
    Posts
    114

    Angry Watch For Spiders

    This morning I walk to bee's to check them out as I always do. I was 30 or 40ft away from them and something didn't look right in front of one of them. A spider had spun a web right under the entrance and it had 25 or 30 bee's in it. So I knocked it down and cleaned up around the hive with a broom. My hives set on a deck below the house along a small creek so cleaning up is easy.


    Greg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    ludlow, Ma . USA
    Posts
    78

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    I saw two black spiders (I live in mass so they are not black widows). I am a huge arachnophobic, the spiders where on the outside of the outer cover and the bees where on the inside of the cover; I had to face two of my fears one is spider and the other is when the bees swarm around me. I faced the spider fear better, instead of dropping and running I carefully placed the cover on the ground and continued my hive inspection. I had a FitBit on me and it measures cal burned, when I looked at the Fitbit it showed a spike on my heartrate at the same time i was dealing with my fears. wife got a nice laugh at it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Hudson, Wisconsin,USA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Almost every time we inspect our two hives we find little web/egg nests of these little black spiders (size of my fingernail) on the inside of our outer covers. I don't like the little creeps either. Do you think they are just trying to find a dark, dry spot, or mean harm to the girls?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,770

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    A couple of years ago I made a rare, early morning inspection of my hives. About halfway through I felt a tickling on the front of my lower leg. I figured it was a bee that had crawled up my pants so I swatted at it and kept going. An instant later I felt a sharp pain which I assumed was a sting. Within a few seconds it turned into a burning pain, unlike a sting but I just ignored it. Later that day I pulled up the pant leg and there were two holes right next to each other like small fangs. There was an angry, red circle around the holes which was getting swollen. I left it alone and over the next few days it got worse first and then better. I still think it was a spider bite but I have no idea what kind. No matter because where before I kind of ignored them, I now pay a lot more attention.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Quincy, Mass USA
    Posts
    224

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Quote Originally Posted by nhoyt View Post
    I saw two black spiders (I live in mass so they are not black widows).
    I would be careful..... I have actually seen a black widow in the back of my woodpile..... From personal experience I can confirm that they are in Mass.... Spiders of Massachusetts
    Since '12 Zone 7a 5H TF SC

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
    Posts
    2,028

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    I once saw a black widow spider in Maine. The bee inspector had caught it in a jar after spotting it in a hive from away out on the blueberries .

    Wayne

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    971

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Yup, Black Widows can range north into Canada.

    I was mystified when I saw a large black spider with 4 red marks on its back in West Virginia, under tree bark. It looked like a Black Widow body, but the ones I grew up around (Southern Black Widows) had the classic red hourglass on the underside of the abdomen.

    I looked it up, and discovered the damyankee Black Widow. Y'all got 'em too.

    But they are not orb weavers ... not likely to see a classic net web made by one. Their webs tend to be a tangled little lair in a corner.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    586

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Brown Recluses like dark areas, they don't have to build a web either. Nice place for them under the cover and above the inner cover. We have plenty of them around here. They don't attack you, but if one gets on you and you force it to bite, you will get one nasty wound that takes months to heal.

    I hate the cockroachs that tend to inhabit the unguarded areas of a hive. Kill a ton of them with a hive tool around here. I guess they are drawn to the sweetness.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    brownwood, TX, USA
    Posts
    831

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    God I hate cockroaches. We have an abundance of black widow and brown recluse spiders in West Texas. Black widows have a bad reputation as killer spiders, but I know a couple of guys that have been bitten by them and it was much ado about nothing. One fellow didn't even seek medical attention, the other went to the emergency room and they gave him a mild antibiotic and sent him home. The brown recluse is a different and horrifying experience. Their bite causes necrosis, or the killing of cell tissue around the bite. The bite often leaves a huge scar, and it takes weeks to cure up. As stated above, they build very small webs in obscure places. One of my old pals has an indention is his thigh that looks like half of a soft ball was removed from his leg. It is from a brown recluse bite. The doctors had to cut away dead tissue twice and it left him with weakened muscle. It took months to correct. They're bad dudes.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Williamson/Burnet Co, Texas, USA
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Quote Originally Posted by lazy shooter View Post
    God I hate cockroaches. We have an abundance of black widow and brown recluse spiders in West Texas. Black widows have a bad reputation as killer spiders, but I know a couple of guys that have been bitten by them and it was much ado about nothing. One fellow didn't even seek medical attention, the other went to the emergency room and they gave him a mild antibiotic and sent him home. The brown recluse is a different and horrifying experience. Their bite causes necrosis, or the killing of cell tissue around the bite. The bite often leaves a huge scar, and it takes weeks to cure up. As stated above, they build very small webs in obscure places. One of my old pals has an indention is his thigh that looks like half of a soft ball was removed from his leg. It is from a brown recluse bite. The doctors had to cut away dead tissue twice and it left him with weakened muscle. It took months to correct. They're bad dudes.
    Since when is Brownwood in West Texas?

    I also see Black Widows about every time I'm out checking on my hive. I'm learning to just watch where I put my hands before I put em there. Haven't seen any recluses this year yet. I'm sure they're out there, just haven't seen em.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    971

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    My parasitology professor back in college related the bite his son got from a brown recluse. It didn't just leave a scar, it left a substantial crater. The necrosis destroyed a fist-sized mass of muscle tissue that never came back.

    But again, we're talking about a reclusive spider that does not make orb webs. I'd like a better description of the web the spider in the original post had spun. Was it a classic insect-catching net (an orb web)? Was it a funnel (funnel spiders are fun to watch)? We're spending a lot of time talking about spiders that the original probably was not.

    All spiders can bite, and all are venomous. Most folks can tolerate most spider bites and hardly notice. So here we are, beekeepers, getting all excited about the potential for harm from what I suspect is a pretty harmless little orb-weaver's bite, while keeping hundreds of thousands of stinging insects as an avocation!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    2,001

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Watch where you put your hands...

    Regular orb weavers are "trappers"...black widows are "hunters". I refer to black widows web building technique as "spitting a web out"...no shape, rhyme, or reason (unless you have a spider's mind) to it. If you pick up a board off of the ground (one of there favorite homesites) and you see a haphazard wad of spider web...BEWARE!!!

    I found these last Saturday when I was swapping out some bottom boards...they were all beneath one hive. Three big females. These widows had the best of both worlds as you might be able to make out from the bee carcasses. There were some wolf spiders that I left but the widows I gave the "shb pressure test" to...they failed the test. There was one small widow that I didn't realize was there until I was reviewing the pictures...it was there in one picture and gone in another so I figure it's still roaming around the hives...maybe it was a male?









    Oh, and I saw this little fellow slithering through the grass at dirt level where I had cleaned up a pile of wood and debris that had accumulated over the last four years in the beeyard. I was cleaning the bee's waterpan so I stood it on edge and "chased" him into it for his photo-op...he cooperated peacefully. I let him go and he's now guarding the beeyard for me. I've never seen one of these, but from what I can tell it is a juvenile "Ringneck" that is actually somewhat common over North America...supposedly it's mostly nocturnal and "slightly" venomous.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, IN
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Looks like a regular old guarder snake.

    Greg

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
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    2,001

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Quote Originally Posted by LanduytG View Post
    Looks like a regular old guarder snake.

    Greg
    "Guarder" snake...<chuckle>

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Spring Tx
    Posts
    117

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    I went out to the hive yesterday, and low and behold about 10ft. in front of the hive built in the girls flight path was a good size web. One girl in the web trying to break loose, the web appeared to have had holes in it, so she wasn't the first one. Went to the shed to get a broom too take it down, when I returned she had gotten loose, took it down, never saw the spider. Smart little critters to figure out where to put it !

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    2,001

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    And it will probably have the web re-built in no time at all....

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    971

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Sheesh, thread drift! Spiders and snakes!

    OK, I'll bite. Doesn't look like a ring-necked snake to me. The ring-necked has a plain grey body with smoother shiny scales. The one you have is brown, has keeled scales, and stripes. But for the ringed neck I'd guess a Dekays brown snake, but I think I recall a garter snake with an orange ringed neck. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diadophis_punctatus

    I've never had a ring-necked snake bite, and if it did the rear fangs would not break human skin.

    Ringneck001Compr.jpg Ringneck005Compr.jpg

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Greenfield, IN
    Posts
    114

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Quote Originally Posted by Intheswamp View Post
    "Guarder" snake...<chuckle>
    I can tell you I'm know genius. "Garter" In my 57 years it has always sounded like people saying guarder.

    Greg

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    2,001

    Default Re: Watch For Spiders

    Greg, I thought you were alluding to my mention of it guarding my bee yard, thus my "chuckle". To be honest I had to go look and be sure what the correct spelling was. I can usually spell pretty good...it's the pronunciation that kills me...I've got a guy at work that is constantly entertained by my murder of the English language.

    Ed

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