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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Romania, Sibiu
    Posts
    327

    Default Explain differences

    I don't intend to be a TF(I'll go for a partial approach using one OA dribble/year) but I'm curious about one thing.

    I have a yard of nucs(some of them are really strong by now in singles). Last treatment was 1 year ago using OAV, no VSH just regular queens from my area.

    How do you explain the huge differences in varroa infestation btw. hives?

    Bigger hives are much prone to higher numbers as they lay more but in my yard it turned out to be the opposite:

    Found 5 frame nuc with 20%, some other with 5% and some with less then 0.5%. I was inspecting with the purpose of gaining knowledge regarding the correlation btw. bee behavior and mite infestation. In many of my nucs I can see bees being a bit too restless and found this 2 being so calm so I tested these for mites and found those low numbers.

    So one is a 10 framer and the other a 5 framer with the same 0.5%.

    Thanks.
    Dfa (Humid continental warm summer climate)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lafargeville ny usa
    Posts
    1,220

    Default Re: Explain differences

    that's kind of how mites are, hard to predict. if you get lucky and have some low counts it is easy to think you found some magic answer, you have not. you have to monitor and manage or sooner or later things will get nasty. the 20% count hive is in the "dead hive flying range". less than .5% is great.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chickamauga, Walker County, Georgia
    Posts
    392

    Default Re: Explain differences

    Of course, mites (like everything else) are natural predators, attempting to gain access to a highly-protected area and having varying degrees of success in doing so. Their success, therefore, does not entirely correlate to what you do or don't do.

    Furthermore ... we should remember that "varroa mites," being a natural predator of honeybees, are also undoubtedly something that honeybees have encountered for, well, at least "hundreds of thousands of" years. They certainly know how to fight them off, and, I am equally sure, how to somewhat-tolerate their presence in the hive. It will be a continuous tug-of-war that is never stable from day to day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,369

    Default Re: Explain differences

    Honeybee? The mite that is giving problems now on the European honey bee does have a working arrangement with the Asian bee that is quite different. The European bee may be able to learn adequate coping mechanisms for this foreign invader but so far it appears to be a "work in progress".

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Romania, Sibiu
    Posts
    327

    Default Re: Explain differences

    I'm planning on doing a bit of selection regarding varroa. Using only one time treatment I think I can achieve that. My guess was that those 2 hives had a bit of success in removing the mites or smt. but of course I'm speculating. I have very little experience with bees and varroa.
    I'm anxious to see the results in Spring . So far so good: I don't expect a further big increase in numbers as laying has diminished.
    Dfa (Humid continental warm summer climate)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,593

    Default Re: Explain differences

    Sounds like a plan Cristian. There can be many reasons why one hive has less mites than another, could just be the position in the apiary.

    But all small beekeepers like you and me can do is breed from what appears to be the best, so good luck!

    Varroa mites have been living with American honeybees for something less than 30 years.

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