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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Knox Co, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    857

    Default Comb Honey Knife

    I have a few frames of comb honey and I'm looking for a knife to cut it. For those that do cut comb honey what is your preference? What do you think of these:

    http://www.betterbee.com/Products/Co...Cut-Comb-Knife
    http://www.dadant.com/catalog/produc...oducts_id=1108
    http://www.amleo.com/product.aspx?p=8AML

    Or, do you have another favorite?

    Thanks,

    Tom

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ft. Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    562

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    The serrated steak knife that you have in your kitchen drawer is what I've always used. Of course if you need an excuse for a new toy, go for it....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    tacoma, wa. usa
    Posts
    169

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    If you only have a couple to do, another kitchen choice would be the serrated bread knife....it's long, flexible and works very well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I use one of the cutters to mark it and then I cut it with a sharp paring knife. Judging by what I see in most people's kitchens, I don't think most people know what a sharp knife is... but a very sharp knife works better than anything else.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Schenectady, NY, USA
    Posts
    260

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I agree with Michael. When I used to go to more conferences there seemed to always be someone selling paring knives with blades made from old band saw blades. These are not stainless, but can be sharpened to a scary razor edge that lasts a very long time. They are still my favorite.
    Lloyd Spear, Owner of Ross Rounds, Inc. Manufacturers of round section comb equipment and Sundance Pollen Traps.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Knox Co, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    857

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Quote Originally Posted by lloyd@rossrounds.com View Post
    I agree with Michael. When I used to go to more conferences there seemed to always be someone selling paring knives with blades made from old band saw blades. These are not stainless, but can be sharpened to a scary razor edge that lasts a very long time. They are still my favorite.
    That is why I put the third link in my post. It is a high carbon blade on a knife used for grafting trees. High carbon blades are harder to find. They can dull a little quicker. But, they are easy to get very sharp.

    I see lots of people recommend serrated knives. But, it seems that a serrated knife would be more likely to leave a rougher/tattered/crushed edge.

    Tom

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Schenectady, NY, USA
    Posts
    260

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I agree with Tom...I don't understand the emphasis on serrated blades. The comb is super easy to cut and does not want to crush (as does bread, which I associate most with serrated blades). It is important to cut cleanly and not crush so that the cut edges drain quickly and thoroughly.

    Better yet...produce Ross Rounds, with no cutting required and no dripping, ever!
    Lloyd Spear, Owner of Ross Rounds, Inc. Manufacturers of round section comb equipment and Sundance Pollen Traps.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I used dental floss, made a perfect cut. I only did a couple frames though. Laid out the floss on the cooling rack, and just pulled it through itself. Made very clean cuts. i saw it on a video somewhere. G

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Limstone county, Alabama
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I use a filleting knife. The blade is very thin and sharp, and it slides through the comb with a minimum of crushed cells.
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls, and looks like work" -- Thomas A. Edison

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Cape Cod, MA
    Posts
    90

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Make sure the knife blade is not longer than the frame is wide (whichever size frames you use); otherwise the blade is raised up on one side or the other of the frame and won't make contact with the wax.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    The sequence I went through was to buy a cutter thinking it would speed the process. When it crushed the combs rather than cutting and sharpening did not resolve the issue, I went to the knife and used the cutter for marking before cutting. If I didn't already have the cutter, I might just cut a piece of plastic (like plastic lid from a margarine tub, which I would have to get from someone who actually eats margarine) and cut it to the size and use it for a template. That would be cheaper and would probably work well. I haven't done it, but it seems like that would be easy enough and cheaper.
    Last edited by Michael Bush; 07-25-2014 at 08:36 AM. Reason: typo
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Quote Originally Posted by Marysia2 View Post
    Make sure the knife blade is not longer than the frame is wide (whichever size frames you use); otherwise the blade is raised up on one side or the other of the frame and won't make contact with the wax.
    Im not sure I understand. I cut the combs out of the frames whole before cutting into pieces. G

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Camas, WA
    Posts
    1,957

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    I also use a knife to cut the comb from the frame. I use shallows that are the exact height of my cutter. Then I use the cutter to cut the 4 pieces from each frame. No waste and the cuts look great to me (an no one has ever complained).

    I rock the cutter slightly while cutting each section off. Then with the section in the cutter I move it to a draining rack for the night.
    Bruce

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Heber Springs, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    95

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Good article about cut comb honey.
    http://www.honeybeesuite.com/how-to-cut-comb-honey/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,584

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Quote Originally Posted by TWall View Post
    I have a few frames of comb honey and I'm looking for a knife to cut it. For those that do cut comb honey what is your preference? What do you think of these:

    http://www.betterbee.com/Products/Co...Cut-Comb-Knife
    http://www.dadant.com/catalog/produc...oducts_id=1108
    http://www.amleo.com/product.aspx?p=8AML

    Or, do you have another favorite?

    Thanks,

    Tom
    A nice sharp paring knife.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Cumberland Va.
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: Comb Honey Knife

    Quote Originally Posted by bbbthingmaker View Post
    Good article about cut comb honey.
    http://www.honeybeesuite.com/how-to-cut-comb-honey/
    Yep, thats where I saw it, it works great. G

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