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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Posts
    8

    Default Bee paralysis virus

    Anyone familiar with the Bee paralysis virus? I think my hive has it, I replaced the queen a week ago and I don't know if they are going to make it. I know it can't be "cured". I don't think it's Nosema because I don't see feces anywhere. Does anyone have information on how to help my hive?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,257

    Default Re: Bee paralysis virus

    Bee to bee contact Spreads the disease from one bee to another, making it communicable and easily transmitted from one colony to another.
    Studies have shown that CBPV remains viral when found in the feces of infected bees. CBPV was even passed on to healthy bees by being in the presence of infected bee feces alone. Symptoms of CBPV include severe trembling of the wings and body, crawling on the ground, hairlessness, darker or shinier appearance, death, etc. CBPV causes chronic paralysis disease which presents itself as two syndromes with two sets of symptoms.
    The Type 1 syndrome is generally seen as the most common type. Bees infected with Type 1 are unable to fly and are seen crawling on the ground or on plants, sometimes in large groups of thousands of individuals. Other symptoms include bloated abdomen, caused by distension of the honey sac with fluid, and partially-open dislocated wings. Within a few days of infection, the bees die which can cause a huge detriment to the productivity of the hive. These symptoms are identical to symptoms attributed to the “Isle of Wight disease” seen in Britain in the early 1900s.

    Type 2, At first, bees affected with the Type 2 syndrome can still fly, but they become hairless which causes them to appear darker, shinier and smaller than healthy bees. As a result, healthy bees attack the affected – nibbling them as if they were robber bees. Within a few days of infection, the bees become flightless, begin to tremble and ultimately die .

    Given that other bee viruses also cause some of these same symptoms, diagnosis cannot rely on visual inspection of symptoms alone. However, it has also been discovered that seemingly healthy bees were infected and carried CBPV. The reason the virus can sometimes go unnoticed in a host is still unknown.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,892

    Default Re: Bee paralysis virus

    More on CBPV, including some photos and references/links, here:
    https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index...aralysis_Virus
    ultracrepidarian >> noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside of his expertise

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,258

    Default Re: Bee paralysis virus

    How prevelant is this virus in N America?
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Otero County, New Mexico, USA
    Posts
    1,384

    Default Re: Bee paralysis virus

    Not sure there is anything that can be done for this. I have seen it a few times - never the Type 1 though. Seems like most hives have a few bees that match the Type 2 description at some point or another.
    NM desert/mountain beekeeper - Black Mesa Honeybees.

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