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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    sewell, nj
    Posts
    524

    Default question about oxalic acid treatment

    Mites spread from colony to colony by drifting workers and drones within an apiary so would it be beneficial to treat first thing in the morning when all the field bees are in?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,721

    Default Re: question about oxalic acid treatment

    Maybe. But it won't stop drifting after treatment.
    Go to Heaven for the climate, go to Hell for the company. -Mark Twain

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    3,064

    Default Re: question about oxalic acid treatment

    It might help but how much is questionable. considering bees will drift, particularly drones you would have to insure you treat every colony within your apiaries flight zone.

    Varroa exist primarily on the drones. or at least in the drone cells. It is likely they are primarily spread by drones which also are the most likely to drift.

    As far as I am concerned treated hives will build up another population of mites. Such measures to get more of them in a single treatment may delay that build up by a small degree. but not enough for me to get out their earlier to make the application. The new mites for the most part are not coming from your hive. This is the basic argument about treatment free beekeepers keepign their untreated hives near other yards. Their bees infect our bees. I do not necessarily agree with that claim. I believe any bees infect other bees. Treated, untreated and feral.

    Mites are a parasite that are 100% infectious and over time 100% lethal.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Athens, OH
    Posts
    2,721

    Default Re: question about oxalic acid treatment

    FWIW- I do it first thing in the morning because it's not so hot.
    Go to Heaven for the climate, go to Hell for the company. -Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    959

    Default Re: question about oxalic acid treatment

    I find it is much easier to place the vaporizer and seal the hives when the foragers are not coming and going. If you are doing dribble or spray it may not matter. Even bees that are off foraging will pick up enough OA to affect the mites when they return and mingle with the other bees in the hive.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    915

    Default Re: question about oxalic acid treatment

    What really helps controlling mites (in addition to OA) is to add VSH genetics to your hives. They are not the "silver bullet" but they are certainly a noticeable aid in controlling varroa, at least in my hives. I use the OA dribble method and last fall I didn't have enough mites to bother treating. This spring the hives were still in good shape. I credit this to the VSH queens I introduced last summer, so I am doing a few splits with new VSH queens this month. I will probably do a dribble in the fall just to be certain the mites aren't doing a "sneak" buildup.

    JMO

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

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