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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    24

    Default Re-queening issues

    I came out of winter with a really strong hive. I saw capped queen cells on April 18. I did a split a week later with the mother queen. The split is doing well.

    The parent hive raised a queen. I saw the virgin queen. She did not however manage to start laying. I looked for her twice with a friend and we couldn't find her. So on May 26 I introduced a mated queen after waiting 3 days. The bees were licking her and seemed non-aggressive towards her. Well, she is now missing and no sign of eggs except that now I have about 6 capped queen cells which means she must've laid a few eggs and then died or something. I have no evidence yet of laying workers. I have added a frame of eggs back into the parent hive from the split.

    My options:

    1. Wait it out and see if they succeed with the third queen
    2. Find a mated queen somewhere
    3. Combine the hive back together with the split.
    4. Something else...

    Ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,361

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    Wait. As long as you have decent numbers, give them a frame of brood every other week until you see eggs. You could get another queen, but since you have capped cells, they may be hatched by the time you get one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    OK. I did not realize how hard getting queen right would be when I made my split back in April. It is quite stressful!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    Hi BeeGurl. Hope you're doing well. I have never bought a queen, but from what I've read on here, it is not unusual at all for commercial queens to be superceded. I'd leave them alone and let them choose one of the queens that emerges for their new mother.
    Lawrence Heafner
    15 hives; 15 years; TF for 10; Zone 7B

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ash Grove MO. USA.
    Posts
    533

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    Yes there is some risk to raise your own queen. Probably about the same a buying one. That being said I raise mine. I probably have 20% that don't make it back from mating flights or don't get properly mated.

    I would let them raise their own. However by the time her brood hatches you'll be really low on bees unless you give them a frame of capped brood every 10 days or so.
    You can wait until population starts to fall off but I like to keep bees of all ages in the hive.
    I have several hives and I use a different hive for the doner and doesn't seem to hurt any of them but will really help this one.

    Last year I had a similar situation. While checking to see if my new queen was laying I found her with with a few eggs around her. I actually watched her lay one. I carefully closed the hive up and checked in a week. Much to my surprise every egg she laid had been turned into a queen cell.

    Did I damage her putting the frame back in? I'm very careful with any fram but especially when it's got a new queen on it.

    Regardless they raised a new one and all is well.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    I am going to wait for the hive to raise their queen. I will try to add some brood from another hive at the end of the week if I have some to spare. I have three hives. Only one is currently queen right! What a nightmare!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Vancouver, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,253

    Default Re: Re-queening issues

    I agree that it is stressful when hives aren't Queenright.

    This is just the start of of my 2nd year. I expect I had the same issues last year...but only in one hive I was aware of as they never raised a successful Queen. However they accepted the one I bought for them.

    This year I had 4 packages, 2 hives that came out of winter without laying Queens and 2 hives that I know swarmed...there were likely some I am not aware of as well.

    All but one of the packages super ceded their Queen. I purchased them Queens and although released and laying at least one superceded her. Now they have a Queen cell and look like they are changing reign again!

    The 2 from winter also superceded their purchased Queens...one went hopelessly Queenless and now have capped Queen cells from brood I gave them.

    I currently rank trying to keep hives Queenright along with trying to get them over the winter

    If the season was longer I don't think I would feel so pressured.

    I wanted to try raising a few Queens this year but taking frames from functioning hives to shore up the others leaves me wondering if I can get enough bees together for a cell starter hive.
    Janne....first hives April 2013, 19 hives, treat, plant zone 8b, at sea level, latitude 49.13, longitude 123.06

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