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  1. #1
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    Feb 2014
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    Default need help on identifying a possible problem.

    The other day I noticed what looked like mummified bee parts on the landing board. I really didn't think much of it, then I seen a bee drag one out yesterday. So today I opened it up to see how things were going. I installed the hive on may 18th from a nuc. They have the 3 and half of the 5 frames I added to the deep drawn. I see lots of fresh eggs capped brood and a good looking queen. But I seen on one of the frames that was with the nuc has really dark capped brood and some nurse bees are pulling the mummified bee parts out of the really dark caped brood. Is this foulbrood? Thanks forany input.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Springfield, Ohio, USA
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    I'm still getting my legs under me, but from what you've described (mummified brood), it sounds like you might be dealing with chalkbrood. When you say 'mummified' do you mean that the whole larva is in one piece? I hope that others will chime in.
    Pete. New 2013, 7 hives, zone 6a
    To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chemguy View Post
    I'm still getting my legs under me, but from what you've described (mummified brood), it sounds like you might be dealing with chalkbrood. When you say 'mummified' do you mean that the whole larva is in one piece? I hope that others will chime in.
    I have not seen them in one piece. By the time the bees get them out of the comb they are in pieces. The bee pieces are really dry and hard. What can be done about chaulkbrood?

  4. #4
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    Nov 2012
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Pete. New 2013, 7 hives, zone 6a
    To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Yea, sounds like chalkbrood. It gets set off with moist environments, but can be carried in the genetics also. Good hive ventilation helps, warmer weather helps. Sometimes it crops up when feeding as it puts more moisture into the hive environment. I myself would requeen with different genetics to help prevent it happening in the future.

  6. #6
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    May 2014
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    Redmond, WA
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    I'm not quite ready to agree this might be Chalkbrood as the description isn't complete; it could just as easily be chilled brood from the description.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2012
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by kenargo View Post
    I'm not quite ready to agree this might be Chalkbrood as the description isn't complete; it could just as easily be chilled brood from the description.
    I have had that thought, too. Without seeing the larvae, it is difficult to state anything with certainty.

    Do the larvae look powdery and dry?
    Pete. New 2013, 7 hives, zone 6a
    To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
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    Freedom, Indiana
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by kenargo View Post
    I'm not quite ready to agree this might be Chalkbrood as the description isn't complete; it could just as easily be chilled brood from the description.
    here are pics hope it helps. and works
    https://plus.google.com/photos/yourp...87176871796691

    https://plus.google.com/photos/yourp...87176871796691

  9. #9
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    Feb 2014
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chemguy View Post
    I have had that thought, too. Without seeing the larvae, it is difficult to state anything with certainty.

    Do the larvae look powdery and dry?
    They are dry and whole pieces. They are hard too.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by madams8220 View Post
    Of course it doesn't work….unless you're a Facebooker.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    IMG_20140602_072956~2.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Of course it doesn't work….unless you're a Facebooker.
    IMG_20140602_072956~2.jpg

  12. #12
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    I have so far not encountered chalkbrood in my hives, and have only seen it once in hives that were not my own; I didn't go into that hive but saw the mummies on the landing board. So, my opinion is based only on study and a single observation. Nonetheless, comparison of the photos you took to what I have seen and to those found by searching "chalkbrood" on the web shows a strong similarity.
    Pete. New 2013, 7 hives, zone 6a
    To study and not think is a waste. To think and not study is dangerous.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Freedom, Indiana
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chemguy View Post
    I have so far not encountered chalkbrood in my hives, and have only seen it once in hives that were not my own; I didn't go into that hive but saw the mummies on the landing board. So, my opinion is based only on study and a single observation. Nonetheless, comparison of the photos you took to what I have seen and to those found by searching "chalkbrood" on the web shows a strong similarity.
    it does seem to be, but i think the queen is laying good now there are tons of fresh capped brood and lots of eggs to. we will see though. thank you everyone for contributing.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default Re: need help on identifying a possible problem.

    Chalkbrood. The black mummies are when the fungus in in the reproductive stage. White mummies have vegetative..no spores yet.

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