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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Monroe Co., Indiana, USA
    Posts
    59

    Default Hello from Southern Indiana

    Brand new bee keepers (my wife and I). Will be posting once in a while with questions as we learn this new hobby! Installed two packages two weeks ago into our brand new hives. We have the standard set-up with bottom board, one deep hive body (10 frames), a top feeder housed in a short super frame, inner cover and telescoping outer cover for each of the two hives. Also have on standby an additional deep body and 10 frames to add to each hive later on once the first set of frames are filled out. We have, so far, added 1.8 gallons of sugar syrup to each top feeder which the bees have consumed quickly. We inspected the hives at 7 days and saw the queen in one of them, but not the other. Both queen cages were empty, so we hoped we had just missed her in the other hive. At 11 days I could stand it no more and re-opened the west hive (the one in which we could not see the queen) to look for her. I meticulously inspected each frame...but with no success. The cell foundation in that hive was now well under construction on 7 frames and there were two frames with capped cells. There were a few cells that protruded outward farther than the others. This gives me hope as I believe this is an indication the queen is doing her job. On both inspections, unfortunately, I forgot my reading glasses, and was unable to see larve planted in any of the cells. Will take the magnifying glass for our next lesson (inspection) later this weekend. Hopefully we will not have to ask for advice on how to install a new queen!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Bledsoe County, TN, USA
    Posts
    81

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Welcome to Beesource!
    Congratulations on your new hives. It sounds like you have a great plan. Seeing the eggs and larvae will be more of an indication of your queen than anything else. It is like not seeing the wind. LOL. Bee very careful not to squish her while you're inspecting. Yes, take your magnifying glass and give it a little more time. Better experts than me will have some great advice on this website.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,270

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Welcome, Your bees should do well in little Egypt.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Monroe Co., Indiana, USA
    Posts
    59

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Thank-you jrose1970 and Tenbears! It's nice to know I now have a place where I can get good advice and learn from folks who are veterans! I will bee very careful not to squish the queens. What worries me most is both of our queens came with fluorescent green dots on their backs. I feel like I should have been able to see her, but those other bees were just piled up thick on those frames...quite amazing how hard they work. Thanks again!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Lakeland, Florida
    Posts
    543

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Welcome aboard! A lot of us newbees hanging around. Great place to learn, educate, and entertain oneself!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Knox, Pa. USA
    Posts
    1,270

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    RD35 the queen can usually be found on a frame that has the most bees on it. Capped brood that bulges out is general drone brood. If you have newly capped worker brood then you had a queen at least 10 Days ago, I always look for brood in varying stages of development. that way I can date when the queen was for sure last present. As I do not always concentrate on finding her! If I see eggs I know she was there at least in the past 3 days, I also find it helpful to gaze at the whole frame rather than inspecting every bee to see the queen. by watching the overall picture I can see the slight trail of emptiness that follows the queen.

    Walmart has 3 pairs of reading glasses for $7.97 place a pair in your hive tool box, and one in the breast pocket of your bee jacket. That way you will always have a pair when working the bees. (the words of experience) LOL

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,997

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Welcome 35!
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    788

    Default Re: Hello from Southern Indiana

    Welcome, and enjoy.

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