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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Frederick, CO
    Posts
    5

    Default Nectar Flow Question(s)

    Hello,

    I live on the Front Range of Colorado, north of Denver. I've been trying to research the nectar flow(s) of my area, but am having trouble coming up with much.

    I'd like to know when the major flows are for my area and what they are (speaking of types of flowers). Anyone know? Is there a site I may visit with this information?

    Starting week four this weekend with my first hive.

    Thank you!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,460

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    Are you in town? Out in the country? Up high? Way down in the valley (like only a mile high)? North face? South face? All of these will change things dramatically... I had bees in Laramie at 7,200 just outside of town. Hard to say what the "main flow" was or when it was. A lot of things bloom at different times along the way. But what blooms in an alpine meadow on the south side of the mountain will be different than the north side... my guess is you'll have to map it out yourself.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Frederick, CO
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    Thanks Michael!

    I live in Frederick and my hive is set up just a few miles from my house on a friend's animal farm. It's a bit north of HWY 52 east of Firestone/Frederick. I'm worried that there may be too much corn grown in the area. I don't see a lot from neighboring farmers coming up yet, mostly it looks like the wild grasses that grow out here everywhere. The bees are bringing in pollen from somewhere, but I don't have anything to compare against. I don't know if the spring build up is slow or average or what. I do have other options for where I can place the hive.

    Clay

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Finksburg MD
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    NASA tracks the nectar flow nationwide. They use volunteers with scale hives. They are always looking to add more volunteers.
    http://honeybeenet.gsfc.nasa.gov/Hon...orage_info.htm

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,460

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    > I'm worried that there may be too much corn grown in the area.

    My bees have been in foraging range of corn for 40 years.

    It's the weeds and wildflowers that the bees will be living on.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Frederick, CO
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    Thanks Michael!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Nectar Flow Question(s)

    I used to run about 60 hives up around there. Alfalfa & clover will be your main flows - normally early to mid-June through July, with others into September. Miscellaneous others thrown in like fruit trees, dandies, flower gardens, soil conservation plantings, and on, etc. I used to figure it was pretty much over in August, but every year is unique. The weather has been changing enough that there now seems to be an early main in June-July, and often a secondary main in August-Sept.

    Alfalfa is a gangly purple flowered bush/plant, and often cut at peak bloom for premium feed value. Flows are governed by natural cycles - some years there are two cuttings, others - three, depending on the timing and persistence of our unpredictable rains. The cuttings usually come at the time when they could be providing the most benefit to our bees, but make better tastier hay for horses & cattle, fetching a higher a premium, so...

    So what your bees will likely have to forage on is somewhat governed by that. Clover is a spindly white to bright yellow flowered plant/bush. Similar concept to alfalfa. Both have been raised agriculturally in the area, and still may be. As a result both, being hardy plants, may often still occur scattered along windrows, irrigation canals, stock ponds and such, providing ample bee forage all summer with natural encouragement (rain). Dry years are anther story...

    Bottom line - in a decent average year of moisture, you will likely never have enough bees...
    Last edited by Colobee; 05-20-2014 at 09:08 PM.

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