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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Default Re: first successful install

    When it's cold I always feed warm syrup. If the syrup is cold, I warm it up...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Josephine County,Oregon,USA
    Posts
    139

    Default Re: first successful install

    Quote Originally Posted by shannonswyatt View Post
    Hopefully they a drawing comb. You can't see it for some time, then all of the sudden it is there.
    I agree. My new package,for my second and new hive/installed April 16, is clustered at the top of the first 4 bars and I haven't seen a thing when I looked except a ball of bees. I'm not worried because they've eaten--but a relatively small amount of syrup(a quart in a week over the rainy days).They are active flying when the sun hits them and it's warm enough.Last year my first package did the same thing but I read here it takes awhile for them to get started and for me that was true. They begin several bars under cluster cover up top and don't make one full bar at a time. I haven't seen pollen coming in for mine either but if they are flying and I assume they are bringing in nectar or pollen when I'm not looking as also stated above. It helps that I went through this last year!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: first successful install

    Alright all is well. I went in today and they have at least 3 half drawn combs. there may be more but I stopped when I saw the queen was alive and well. I didn't take the time to see if there were any eggs but I did notive pollen getting packed in. they went through about a pint of sugar syrup. They had created a traffic jam today in it and there were about 30 that were just about to drown. I scooped them out on the ground and they started cleaning themselves. I refilled and added some more beads.

    20140425_123138.jpg

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: first successful install

    Comb is finally solidly visible through the glass. We are in a Cold snap right now so they probably won't make much progress until the weekend. Our daytime highs are not going to make it out of the 50's today.



    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    672

    Default Re: first successful install

    Good news!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: first successful install

    Alright a couple of pictures from last night. The first 5 bars look about the same. They had really stalled out on building comb and now they are back at it. The new comb is all being added to the sides of the older comb. I am not sure why they built the bars 3/4 out then moved to the next bar back. Bar 6 is 3/4 built but empty. They have just started on bar 7. I added a bar between 3 and 4 and added one more bar at the back so they have 12 to work with. I am guessing that all this brood will be emerging in the next week.








  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Vancouver, Washington
    Posts
    228

    Default Re: first successful install

    Gorgeous! Isn't it such a thrill?

    In one of my two hives, the bees also built "less" comb on a greater number of bars. Maybe it's my short attention span hive!

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: first successful install

    Alright things are still going good in hive #1. They don't seem to build as fast as some of you but they are making progress. About a week ago I noticed them building comb with much larger holes than any of the other combs. I figured that was destined to hold honey. I went ahead and added spacers to make the bar 1.5" wide. They had also started on the next bar, it was only about a 2" piece of comb. I moved that between bar 4 and 5. Things seemed to slow down after that. The queen was still laying and after a few days I could see brood and capped brood through the window. I was kind of excited to have the chance to see brood crawl out.

    The larger comb is on the right.


    Unfortunately I was not able to see any of the brood come out, the population of this hive has to have at least doubled, if not tripled. This is a weekish later.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Default Re: first successful install

    >I also should have listened. My thinking was is I hang the queen I risk messed up comb. If I direct release I risk loosing a queen.

    You have a 99% chance they will mess up all the comb in the hive if you hang the queen cage and leave it too long. You have a 0% chance they will kill the queen if you direct release (unless there is a queen loose in which case it is irrelevant as you still have a queen). You have a 1% chance the queen will fly, in which case you have a 50% chance she will return... you have a 15-20% chance they will abandon the queen (caged or not) and move next door to a better queen because of the quality of the queens... you just have to play the odds...

    Hanging the queen cage in a foundationless system "just to be safe", is not "safe"...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Isle of Wight, VA
    Posts
    546

    Default Re: first successful install

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    You have a 0% chance they will kill the queen if you direct release (unless there is a queen loose in which case it is irrelevant as you still have a queen). ...
    Michael, how do you feel about direct release of a replacement queen in a hive that has been queenless for some time? The beek that I bought her from said he only has a 10% success rate in reintroducing a queen for a hive that has been queeless more than 5 days. Made me kind of nervous. I had her in a jelly jar in the hive for ~30 hrs and then directly released her. Looked 15 hrs later for eggs to steal to another hive and found that the nuc already had hatched their own queen so there were 2 of them running around the hive (neither one laying eggs). So the newly introduced queen got put back in the screened jam jar and introduced to 2 frames from another queenless hive. I'm hoping she lays it up with eggs before Sat, when I will have to put her in the main hive with all the queenless bees. Just trying to make sure they don't do her in.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Default Re: first successful install

    >Michael, how do you feel about direct release of a replacement queen in a hive that has been queenless for some time?

    I never direct release a queen to a hive. A package is really just a swarm of sorts. A hive is a different animal entirely. The only direct introduction I ever do to a hive is a frame with the laying queen and her entourage and her brood into a hive that knows it's queenless.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    Posts
    82

    Default Re: first successful install

    How long do the bees stay in the hive before they go forage? We had a nice sunny day and most were still just festooning in the hive. They had completely built out the first inserted bar in the brood area so I went ahead and added one more bar. All the capped brood from post 26 were out. and now there is capped brood on the perimeter of all those combs.


  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,320

    Default Re: first successful install

    >How long do the bees stay in the hive before they go forage?

    Sometimes they have to sit and think a while. The colony is making up it's mind what it plans to do. Sometimes they sit like this a while and then move to a different part of the hive and go to work. Sometimes they stay there but go to work... how long it takes them to make up their mind varies from colony to colony...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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