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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Romania, Sibiu
    Posts
    299

    Default against the tide

    Yesterday while reading a topic about queen rearing I ran into Kirk Webster site with articles and some videos from some finish guy that had visited him. It's amazing to see people who think so clear, so naturally.
    It's my opinion too that we should simplify our lives to the maximum and live close to land where we were born from and were we'll go in the end.
    After reading some of the articles I am sure that this varroua thing could be dealt in a different manner. I will try to follow the same path.

    You have my respect and love guys for what you do.

    ... so far I've only used OAV in the autumn. I'll keep an eye on the counts and probaly this year I will not treat as I will be making nucs from 7 hives.

    Regards,
    Cristian
    Dfa (Humid continental warm summer climate)

  2. #2

    Default Re: against the tide

    Hello Cristian,

    Kirk Webster is one of the most intelligent persons I have ever met. Often a person like him, philosopher, feels strongly the vanity of all material things. He is running a program of apprentices, this way he is guiding by hand young peope to get a good start in beekeeping, and life.

    All the best to you!

    http://kirkwebster.com/
    Treatment free, honey production, isolation mated queens, www.saunalahti.fi/lunden/varroakertomus.html

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Romania, Sibiu
    Posts
    299

    Default Re: against the tide

    My area might have a big advantage regarding this matter.

    I noticed last summer a total brood break on both my hives at the end of August and all September. At that time mite counts were under 2%. I think the brood break is dued to the cold nights near the mountains. I asked a beekeeper nearby about it and he confirmed the habbit. Another beekeeper has also told me that I can easily get away with one treatment in autumn.
    My first concern when starting with bees were the treatments. I didn't want to use amitraz as everybody does in my country, so I choosed OAV. It worked ending up killling about 200 mites in the big hive. I probably could leave them without treatment. I have to find out what the acceptable threshold is in my area and I have to do it alone as here nobody cares in counting the mites; they just treat cause they've been told to.

    I will read the info on the page you've send and also continue to read Kirk's articles. Having the knowledge and methodology gives me a more relaxed perspective. I will not let my bees die in any case. They are too expensive for my money. I will breed from the more resitant ones. Definetelly this is the key to it.

    Regards,
    Cristian
    Dfa (Humid continental warm summer climate)

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