Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 120
  1. #61
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,551

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Very true, but you may have done that. Until you get laying brood it is up in the air.

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Thanks! I'll just have to chalk this up to the cost of an education. Live and learn I guess.

    Is there anything else I can do with this queen so I don't loose her as well?

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Bar View Post
    Thanks! I'll just have to chalk this up to the cost of an education. Live and learn I guess.

    Is there anything else I can do with this queen so I don't loose her as well?
    If you had some open brood to give I wonder if you could make up a nuc for her?

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    That's the problem. I'm new and these are all new hives.

    If I have any open brood, it's in brand new hive. I'll check around and see if I can get any from another local beekeeper, but almost for sure it will have to come from a Langstroth hive. Mine are all Top Bar.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Bar View Post
    That's the problem. I'm new and these are all new hives.

    If I have any open brood, it's in brand new hive. I'll check around and see if I can get any from another local beekeeper, but almost for sure it will have to come from a Langstroth hive. Mine are all Top Bar.
    Ohhh, I misread that before. I see what you're saying. I wonder if there is a way you can bank her and keep her alive in case something happens in one of the other hives. Or maybe bank her until one of the others can spare some resources... which might be a slim chance in the first year. That would be good insurance to have her around.

    You could also make up a Langstroth nuc if you are able to get some brood from a local.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    How would I go about "banking" her? I've not heard that term before.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Bar View Post
    How would I go about "banking" her? I've not heard that term before.
    I'm not the right person to ask, and it maybe isn't a great idea for your situation. You could probably search here.

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...=banking+queen

    Worst case, maybe you can find someone nearby that needs a queen and make their day? Maybe "pay it forward" to someone you may need help from later on?

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Exeter, WI
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    If you have a local club, it is probably easier to see if anyone needs a queen. In early spring there are usually people looking for queens. You could easily sell it to someone to recoup your money. The hives that got the extra bees will get off to a great start, they may even be strong enough that you could make a split later in the year if ou want to fill the now empty hive. Or just keep it until next year and hope to make some splits then.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Sounds good. When I get home, if I don't think the hive can make it with the new queen, I'll see if anyone can use her.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Quote Originally Posted by Top Bar View Post
    Sounds good. When I get home, if I don't think the hive can make it with the new queen, I'll see if anyone can use her.
    If you're correct and there's only 30-40 bees in the hive, that battle has already been decided.
    Last edited by jwcarlson; 04-17-2014 at 10:07 AM.

  11. #71
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Yeah, I think that's the case. It was cold when I looked through the window, and I just want to be sure.

  12. #72
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    I just got a text message from my brother. I asked him to watch some land and see if they're bringing in pollen. He said "a few with big yellow calves and a couple of them dancing". It's 53 degrees today.

    The bees basically haven't been leaving the hive for the past 3-4 days, and they have never brought back any pollen. Hoping against hope that this gal can pull them out!

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lexington, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Good Luck JW!

  14. #74
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,551

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Pollen is a good sign. Can't make bees without pollen. Did he say which dance? Mambo, Electric Slide, Macarena?

  15. #75
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Quote Originally Posted by shannonswyatt View Post
    Pollen is a good sign. Can't make bees without pollen. Did he say which dance? Mambo, Electric Slide, Macarena?
    Chicken dance, this is Iowa afterall, it's going to be something corny.

  16. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"


  17. #77
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,408

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    If you had the resources to bank the queen, you'd basically have the resources to restore her colony (the missing package bees - those that dispersed when their queen was missing).
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  18. #78
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Bethesda,MD, USA
    Posts
    1

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Ditto the General's comment.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clinton, Iowa
    Posts
    763

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Installed caged queen Wednesday. Checked today and found comb and eggs! Also saw the queen purely by chance. Have some nectar or syrup in the combs plus some pollen. Too windy to feel comfortable pulling comb very far out of the hive. I'm lucky I did not break the comb.

    Here's a video my brother took.


    Had the hive open for about a minute is all. Just long enough to confirm they had released her and they were building comb. Took about 24 ounces of syrup since Wednesday evening. Very much relieved. Walked over to the neighbor's pussy willow and weeping willow and watched some honeybees work along with some mason bees. Pretty awesome day.

    Want to stress again how incredibly lucky I was that I didn't send the comb with queen into the bottom of the hive.
    Last edited by jwcarlson; 04-20-2014 at 07:31 PM.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,551

    Default Re: Clustering/Festooning on "honey bars"

    Good job! I saw queen there. You can't twist those bars. Folks with langs will turn the frame, what you want to do with a top bar is lift it up to your eye level. If you hold the bars without your thumbs you will have less of a tendency to twist the bar. It is a natural thing to do so don't kick yourself the first time you break off a comb!

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst ... 23456 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads