Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 32 of 32
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Whitla Ab. Canada
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Quote Originally Posted by CMYSIX View Post
    worried about imported bees but he gets his from new zealand, go figure.... when were NZ bees good brutal cold winter bees?
    I'm not worried about imported bees in general, just what effect the genes from them will contaminate a long surviving feral hive. Because like you say N.Z bees are not necessarily cold weather bees and I don't want to ruin a good feral hive. I am just glad to have been able to locate bees at all this year.
    Colino
    A Bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it rains.- Robert Frost

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,115

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    For what it's worth, I agree with the posts that state that there are almost certainly a number of feral survivors in your area. I don't see how one feral hive can survive 9 years or even 3 without other feral survivors for queens to mate with. Your NZ genetics will have much less effect on say 10 colonies than on one.
    Who knows, the gentics may even have a positive impact on the feral population by bringing in more deversity.
    If you do want to keep your genetics from the feral survivors, just eliminate as many of your drones as you easily can. Then next year or even this year, split your hives and let the new queens mate with the drones from the ferals. Or, pinch your queens after they have started laying. Or similar techniques. That is the easiest way to get those genetics in your hives.
    View yourself as fortunate.
    Last edited by heaflaw; 04-08-2014 at 09:03 PM. Reason: thought of more to say
    Lawrence Heafner
    15 hives; 15 years; TF for 10; Zone 7B

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Whitla Ab. Canada
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Quote Originally Posted by heaflaw View Post
    For what it's worth, I agree with the posts that state that there are almost certainly a number of feral survivors in your area. I don't see how one feral hive can survive 9 years or even 3 without other feral survivors for queens to mate with. Your NZ genetics will have much less effect on say 10 colonies than on one.
    Who knows, the gentics may even have a positive impact on the feral population by bringing in more deversity.
    If you do want to keep your genetics from the feral survivors, just eliminate as many of your drones as you easily can. Then next year or even this year, split your hives and let the new queens mate with the drones from the ferals. Or, pinch your queens after they have started laying. Or similar techniques. That is the easiest way to get those genetics in your hives.
    View yourself as fortunate.
    Ok I'm getting a clearer picture now. There must be other feral hives around but I know for sure that there are no commercial or hobby hives within 5 or 6 miles. Whatever DCA there is around here is most likely feral, so it's pinch the new queens after they start laying and let them raise their own queens which they may do anyway according to a video I watched by Michael Palmer. When the new queens mate it will be feral drones that do the job because the packages probably won't be producing any drones at first. While the new brood won't be fully feral they might inherit enough survivability to make it through our tough winters. I don't expect much honey this year anyway and what I really desire is longevity of my stock with minimum intervention all the while not having to drive to the neighbors to tend my hives.
    Thank you all for putting my mind at ease, this forum is truly an important resource.
    Colino
    A Bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it rains.- Robert Frost

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,658

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Just a comment on the sequence of things. You shouldn't pinch the package queens until you are absolutely certain that you have mated queens. Once you know things are good with your new queens then feel free to dispose of them.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,841

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Also because you don't know how good the genetic is after it is mixed with your NZ bees,
    you might want do a split or 2 before pinching your package queens. You don't want to
    deal with a laying worker hive. I would evaluate first before making them queen less.
    I luv bee source!

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,407

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    I think this is much ado about nothing.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 12 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Whitla Ab. Canada
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Quote Originally Posted by AstroBee View Post
    Just a comment on the sequence of things. You shouldn't pinch the package queens until you are absolutely certain that you have mated queens. Once you know things are good with your new queens then feel free to dispose of them.
    Quote Originally Posted by beepro View Post
    Also because you don't know how good the genetic is after it is mixed with your NZ bees,
    you might want do a split or 2 before pinching your package queens. You don't want to
    deal with a laying worker hive. I would evaluate first before making them queen less.
    Okay I won't pinch them until they've built up enough to start a couple of nucs with the 2 queens and I will leave the parent hives with resources to build new queens. Thanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by RiodeLobo View Post
    I think this is much ado about nothing.
    I've formulated a plan about what I want to do with my bee keeping so I'm just being cautious and I want to build for the future. I don't need to use my bees for income so I want to do it in as environmentally compatible fashion as I can. The bees have been there for 9 years and I have lived long enough to know my ability to screw things up. If I have to destroy something just because I need something to do than I won't do it. With the plan everyone has helped me work out it looks like a go. Besides if it is a none issue I've got the time to be, "better safe than sorry".
    Colino
    A Bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it rains.- Robert Frost

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Posts
    363

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Your best insurance for longevity will be in numbers. The more hives you have going into winter the better your chances of succeeding in a severe environment.

    If you got 10 swarms off that feral hive chances are at least a few would not make it (just the inherent variability in nature). If it were me I'd keep the original two queens if they are building up good but do at least one split from each hive and let them raise their own queens in nucs. Then you have at least four hives going into winter w/ at least two 50% native queens (if one or both hives supercede then daughter queens would be average 75% native).

    Those NZ bees may surprise you.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,759

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Colino, you appear to want to do the natural thing so let nature weed out the genetics that don't work.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Whitla Ab. Canada
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Quote Originally Posted by JClark View Post
    Your best insurance for longevity will be in numbers. The more hives you have going into winter the better your chances of succeeding in a severe environment.

    If you got 10 swarms off that feral hive chances are at least a few would not make it (just the inherent variability in nature). If it were me I'd keep the original two queens if they are building up good but do at least one split from each hive and let them raise their own queens in nucs. Then you have at least four hives going into winter w/ at least two 50% native queens (if one or both hives supercede then daughter queens would be average 75% native).

    Those NZ bees may surprise you.
    I discussed our swarm window with another bee keeper from around here. It turns out that it is mid July to mid August, so that really leaves little time for swarms to build up for winter. Any swarms that do make it through our winters will be good stock. I'm putting out 36 traps this year within a 25 mile radius, so some of the swarms will be from managed colonies and some will be feral, I think I will combine any I catch into hives with good numbers in the hopes that they over winter. I'll try to determine which would be the best queens to keep and these hives will be kept at my neighbors place 5 miles away. Of course all this depends on if I catch multiple swarms or any swarms at all. If I catch swarms from the feral colony I'm concerned about, they will be in my home yard.

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Colino, you appear to want to do the natural thing so let nature weed out the genetics that don't work.
    I never ever thought I would think of myself as a tree huger, but grand children have a way of changing your world view.
    A Bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it rains.- Robert Frost

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,759

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Quote Originally Posted by Colino View Post
    I never ever thought I would think of myself as a tree huger, but grand children have a way of changing your world view.
    You don't have to be a tree huger to impact the world in a positive way but you do have to look at your past and make changes if what you were doing was more harm then good.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,841

    Default Re: Depending on your replies, I may have to quit before I start.

    Remember that the drones also have the 50/50 genetic make up. How do you handle the NZ drones in your
    parent hives to control this part? Do you allow your NZ drones to fly freely or let the F1 daughters to make the
    50/50 drones with less of the NZ genetic influence. Don't forget about the drones too.
    I luv bee source!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads