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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Valdosta, Ga USA
    Posts
    50

    Default waxing hive boxes

    Do any of you Beeks wax dip your brood and super boxes? If so how long should they last compared to a good paint? Is there any difference using paraffin vs bees wax besides the cost?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lorain, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    Are you dipping new or used boxes? I just had all of my old, used boxes hot paraffin wax dipped. Here is how the process went for me -- I scraped them before having them dipped, I painted a couple with Do it Best brand exterior porch paint, those boxes paint held up to the process, NO bubbling or peeling. The other boxes that still had "old" paint on them had most of it bubble and peel. The one box that was cleaned down to natural wood looks really nice, the color darkened slightly due to the Paraffin wax penetrating deeper into the wood, and I really like the look. As far as performance -- I put them out on the deck and they are all shedding water nicely. The only problems that I have encountered is the boxes that I did not paint and had peel, did not have the wax penetrate the wood under were the old paint was. So now I'm scraping again and trying to use a heat gun to spread the wax to those areas. I still do not know if I can paint over the wax, though they say that you can. AND 2 of my medium boxes DID warp and twist, due to this process, I took a plane to them on the top and bottom on opposite corners and that seemed to solve that issue. Many of my frames also warped and twisted. I HAD to dip my boxes because of their questionable past. Now from my current experience and a discussion with a former local bee inspector that is mentoring me- He dipped some New boxes once and had the same issue of boxes warping, he also told me that he found NO difference in dipped vs. painted.--- If I were starting out with NEW boxes, I would NOT go through the expense of dipping my boxes.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    I dipped mine in beeswax and rosin. I bought the paraffin but couldn't bring myself to use it... I think paraffin would work. The bees actually treat the beeswax rosin mix like propolis, gathering it from my gloves and other equipment when I'm dipping.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesdipping.htm

    I dipped them in 2007. Some still look like new and some are gray. It seems to depend on the angle of the grain how much it soaks up and how it ages.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lorain, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    Michael, have you ever had any warp or twist? I have never seen anyone mention it on other threads, so I was shocked when it happened to my boxes. When my mentor seen it he said "It's a common thing" !?! I had the opportunity to have my boxes put in an autoclave @ 185F-200F for 4 hours, now I wish that I had done that.

    I'm going to try painting over the wax on the next nice day that we get here in Ohio. Do you have any suggestions on prepping them?

    I would like to amend my last statement from my last post. If I were starting out with all new white pine boxes I'd paint them. BUT If I were starting out with all new cypress or some other beautifully grained wood I would hot wax or beeswax/rosin dip them and then not paint them as I really do like the way that they look.
    I am female, I like pretty things.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    >Michael, have you ever had any warp or twist?

    No.

    >I have never seen anyone mention it on other threads, so I was shocked when it happened to my boxes. When my mentor seen it he said "It's a common thing" !?! I had the opportunity to have my boxes put in an autoclave @ 185F-200F for 4 hours, now I wish that I had done that.

    I "cooked" mine at about 250 F for 10 minutes. I don't know what would happen in 4 hours...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Laurel Hill, Fl
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    Quote Originally Posted by JellyB View Post
    Michael, have you ever had any warp or twist? I have never seen anyone mention it on other threads, so I was shocked when it happened to my boxes. When my mentor seen it he said "It's a common thing" !?! I had the opportunity to have my boxes put in an autoclave @ 185F-200F for 4 hours, now I wish that I had done that.

    I'm going to try painting over the wax on the next nice day that we get here in Ohio. Do you have any suggestions on prepping them?

    I would like to amend my last statement from my last post. If I were starting out with all new white pine boxes I'd paint them. BUT If I were starting out with all new cypress or some other beautifully grained wood I would hot wax or beeswax/rosin dip them and then not paint them as I really do like the way that they look.
    I am female, I like pretty things.
    I'm a guy and I like pretty hive boxes too. Mine are all Cypress, painted with clear, semi-gloss poly. I would suggest you try lightly scorching your new boxes with a torch. lauri does that and they are the best looking hives I've ever seen.
    Robbin NW Florida(8A) / 14 hives / 2 nd Year / 4 TF - 10T {OAV}

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lorain, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    My friend owns a Tattoo Shop and dabbles w/Bees, she has an Autoclave that is big enough to put deeps into. She has "inherited" old woodenware also. She said that she read an abstract on AFB & EFB from Belgium that tested different methods of eradicating these diseases and found autoclaving to be the most through process of eradication. Therefore this is the method that she uses, then she Paints. I DID autoclave numerous frames @ 200F for 4 hours with NO warping or twisting, VERY time consuming, but we had a nice visit.
    Again, I had my boxes dipped for 2 reasons: #1 questionable past, #2 time constraints.
    I'm just kind of disappointed at the results, considering the cost.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Lafayette, LA - USA
    Posts
    299

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    I thought I read the spores didn't die till 1800 degrees or something crazy like that.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,316

    Default Re: waxing hive boxes

    Some sources say 230 degree Fahrenheit will do it. Others say it takes 320 F. (maybe someone is dyslexic?) I did not easily find a definitive and authoritative number, which seems odd considering its importance.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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