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  1. #21
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    914

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    At the moment I'm looking at 8-channel multiplexers added to the scale amplifier card to enable seven additional sensors off the card. Most of them seem to use a 3-bit address (3 more wires from the controller). It would work.

    For my more grandiose plans of peppering a hive or other instrumentation needs with temperature sensors, those compact little DS18B20's would be the hot ticket ... as I understand it no multiplexing would be needed. A list of addresses would be, and it might take some software tweaking to operate them, as Arduino usually uses 7 or 8-bit I2C addresses. (Just checked, yup, I'd downloaded the datasheet already.)

    For a job like that I might fall back on the UEIDAQ thermocouple datalogger, which has the additional advantage of being able to measure to 1320C.
    Last edited by Phoebee; 03-09-2014 at 06:50 PM.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Edgefield, SC
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    32

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    I saw one hive monitor that used a webcam and PC software to count the number
    of bees in and out of the hive.
    I would like to see this idea expanded to count the number of mites seen on the bees going in and out.
    Would that not be useful to tell the mite load of a hive?
    Sure, you wouldn't see ALL of the mites on EVERY bee but I bet it could eventually tell
    you the overall hive mite load.

  3. #23
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Quote Originally Posted by LizardKing View Post
    I saw one hive monitor that used a webcam and PC software to count the number
    of bees in and out of the hive.
    I would like to see this idea expanded to count the number of mites seen on the bees going in and out.
    Would that not be useful to tell the mite load of a hive?
    Sure, you wouldn't see ALL of the mites on EVERY bee but I bet it could eventually tell
    you the overall hive mite load.
    That was one of my early thoughts, but it turns out the mites mostly hide in the segments of the abdomen and don't show up well. They're also more on drones, which don't come and go as often as workers. Most photos you see of them show a mite on the bee's back on the thorax, but it turns out that's very rare. If they would do that an image recognition program could probably spot them. Might be a tall task for an Arduino, though.

  4. #24
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    Dec 2008
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Thank you for the updates. Keep us posted.

    I will try to pursue the 4-20ma route before we see green grass.

    Crazy Roland

  5. #25
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    I took a quick look at 4-20 mA, and there are chips to do it, but I didn't get far with it. The ones I looked at were kinda large and pricy but I don't see why they have to be. Most likely I'd do the same front end as the Arduino system, but just have boards made that use the 4-20. These little boards are pretty cheap and easy to have fabricated. The strain gage amplifier chip is a INA125 ... the datasheet shows the strain gage application. Just go from there to the current output device.

    The I2C system is probably superseding it because it transmits the data serially, which also deals well with distance. A lot of systems can now read it, and I'm starting to warm up to it. But 4-20 is still available.

  6. #26
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Warning, if you are not an electrical engineer, your eyes will probably glaze over at the technical discussion that follows.

    Starting with a sound track from a hive pilfered from YouTube, I played the track thru a Harmon Kardon HK 725 preamp, using every button available to cut highs and boost lows. I re-recorded the resulting signal in mono on a Sony pocket recorder at its lowest sample rate. This simulates a sample rate we might get on an Arduino computer recording bursts of sound, using adequate low pass filtering to achieve a valid Nyquist criterion while still capturing bee buzz.

    I used GNU Octave (been needing to try it out) to process the signal. Octave is similar to MatLab except for two major differences. First, MatLab costs $3000 for a basic single-user license. GNU-Octave is free, although modest donations are encouraged. Second, Octave lacks a lot of bells and whistles that MatLab has. However, both are equipped with FFT toolboxes, and can take a .wav file and tell what frequencies are present and at what amplitudes.

    Attached are a single pass of a 1024-sample stretch of sound, at a 11,025 Hz sample frequency, and 16-bits, plus two frequency plots which sum 16 and 32 such passes. Supposedly all this could be done by an Arduino computer, although maybe at a slightly slower sample rate (which would show low frequencies even better).

    The two main peaks are at around 120 Hz and 240 Hz. Supposedly the 240 Hz peak is young nurse bees. If this peak goes away, you need to inspect the hive (probably should have a couple of weeks earlier) to find out why you don't have young bees. Possibly because the queen stopped laying a while back.

    I am hoping to make this a standard feature of the hive monitoring system. I don't know how many of you will care, but the cost to add it is a couple of chips and a $5 microphone, and it would be optional. The peaks would probably be represented by two numbers, with the 240 Hz number expected to be higher than the 120 Hz number, so you would not need to be an EE to read this, just know what the numbers normally are and know to inspect the hive if they look different than normal. I would expect this to normally shift during the year, especially when the winter bees take over. You could watch the young nurses come on-line in the spring.

    8K-LPF-FFT-1024.jpg
    8K-LPF-FFT-1024-16pass.jpg
    8K-LPF-FFT-1024-32pass.jpg

  7. #27
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Searching on apidiction doesn't turn up much. Searching here on Apidictor is more fruitful. Here's what is archived on BS. I don't know how solid the underlying research is, but clearly the signals are present and will say something about hive health. If my version works it could run automated and probably add something like $10 a hive to the cost of the hive monitor. The boards would all be the same, and mostly it would be if chips were soldered in and a microphone plugged in.

    http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/apidictor/

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Deer River, MN
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    11

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Hi Phoebee, I've been watching your post with interest. There was a Kickstarter project a few months back that you might be interested in. If nothing else, it might give you some ideas for your own project. Best wishes in your endeavor.

  9. #29
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Cool, I'll have to take a closer look at that project. Ultimately I expect to add a weather station and solar performance station.

  10. #30
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    Jan 2014
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    One of our bee association senior members just sent a link to something related. It is a morass, and open source is not the most profitable business model:

    https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/o...-beehives#home

    Scanning over it, this is a disorganized mess of ideas, but at least some measure of the level of interest. One link may be more on target:

    http://colonymonitoring.com/cmwp/

    The hive weight scheme shown in the link above shows a variation on the usual bathroom scale scheme: One must manually operate a device that lifts and lowers the hive onto an essentially unmodified mechanical or electronic bathroom scale, thus requiring a visit and notepad datalogging.

    And this leads to a NASA website. It does give a Scale Hive Protocol.

    http://honeybeenet.gsfc.nasa.gov/About.htm

  11. #31
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    Mar 2013
    Location
    Menlo Park, CA, USA
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    57

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    In case you haven't seen it, Hivetool.net is pretty cool. One of our local guild members (Redwood City, CA) has two of his hives streaming data to this, and I'd love to get mine hooked up. He was actually able to identify real time when a swarm issued, and rushed home to capture it from a tree in his yard. If this implementation could be adapted to something like an Arduino (I think there is a Raspberry Pi implementation) it would be less infrastructure and less power requirements than using an old laptop.

  12. #32
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    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Yup, that's the idea.

    Tho' I confess to just wanting to have fun tinkering, too.

    My friend Simon has some boards in the works. I never had much luck with the Seeeduino Mega. I probably could get it to run but these things evidently ship with a buggy USB interface and I've not had time to get it talking. The differential amplifiers I ordered from Grove turned out to have had their design changed around the day I ordered ... not what I wanted, didn't work as advertised, improperly documented, and I was not prepared to reverse engineer them to correct the problem. The Chinese designer thinks they may get a round tuit one day.

    Simon thinks he can build better for not a lot more. I eagerly await the first box of toys.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Ravensdale, Washington, USA
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    16

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    I just got my 2 hives setup. My first(s)!!! I built an Arduino Hive controller. It monitors (and can maintain with heat and fan) environmental variables of the hives. Unfortunately I did not get it from the bread board and into the hives as quickly as I had hoped. I was hoping to have it done and in the hive BEFORE the packages arrived... all well I was too slow and the bees arrived Monday.
    All the sensors, heater, fan and LCD screen (with all needed wiring) are in place but the Arduino, the shield I am putting the electronics on and the power supply are still in my house....

    It consists of:
    Arduino Mega 2650 (could not fit the program on a smaller Arduino)
    Ethernet shield with SD card
    2 ds18b20 temp sensors (one for outside box temp or solar gain and one for the bottom board temp where the heater is)
    2 DHS22 (digital humidity and temp sensors on for outdoor and one for inside)
    Real Time clock
    Barometer
    Photo-resistor (light sensor for rough idea of lighting conditions)

    It logs all the temp, humidity, light, and any controls conditions (fan or heater) to the SD card every minute (changable) and logs the time/date info. It also sends that data to my webserver (any computer would work but I went "cloud" lol) so I can graph that data and have it more convenient than out in the yard on an SD card....
    It has a few internal webpages (some I am still working on) that show the status and condition of the hive (done). A page for network settings or DHCP(done). A page for setting temp controls such as when the fan turns on and heater(in progress). Finally a page to change the other settings such as email warnings (when too hot or cold or SD card write fails or whatever...) log interval, email addresses and servers, (working on this)
    It emails me when it starts and many of the conditions of the hive and controller.
    It displays on the 40X2 LCD the hive temp/humidity, outdoor temp/humidity, the air pressure and the date and time. It will tell you when it writes to the sd card or is updating the server or sending an email as well as some other error info in required. I built an RGB LED back-light into the LCD and it changes color based on outdoor temps.... if it is too cold to open the hive it is blue and it turns yellow when it is "ok but get out quick" and green when it is "ok"
    It has a cover switch so if the box is opened it logs the data immediately (does not matter if you had logging set to every 100 hours it will log right now) and sends an email. One could add text messaging to this output if they wanted as well... warnings can be a good thing....

    Everything is changeable in the well noted Arduino sketch. As soon as I finish up the perfboard (what a bad idea!! I should have just had one made from a good schematic...) I will work on the code again to finish up the webpages to change the settings. That way you do not have to reload the Arduino just to change how often it logs, or where the emails go, or at what temp (if any) the fan or heaters turn on). I also need to add the ability to change it from Celsius to Fahrenheit (it is in Fahrenheit)

    Pretty much everything works and I will put it in with the code that is on it. I have just been adding additional webpages to configure the settings and storing them to the eeprom instead of those variables being in the compiled program..... time.. time... just never have enough it seems....

    I would love to add a scale, a mic and a web camera (camera would be separate from Arduino and would require me to put a laser on it to destroy incoming moths and beetles hahaha ) as well as a 3 axis tilt sensor (BEARS/wind) and a "gauge" for my feeder. I have an "out of feed" idea but would like a more accurate level to be displayed... maybe with a flex resistor and a float.... )
    .
    Happy to share code if people are interested. I have a schematic drawn onto the inside cover of a cardboard box that would be helpful as well (if you can read it....)
    I have a bunch of little projects to finish up and will be posting all my build info... including the insulated hives I built... But this is not the thread for that.
    I log into beesource about once a week so don't get mad if I do not get back to you quickly. Just send me a message and I will get back to you eventually.
    April 21, 2014 - 3 Hives - 2 packages and 1 swarm

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Freeland, MI, USA
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    40

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    Glad to hear people are wrestling with the same things I am! I wanted to measure temp, humidity and hive weight but decided I needed to start simple so I stuck with just temp and humidity for now. I'm using an Arduino Uno, three DHT-22 temp/humidity sensors (one on the outside of the hive for ambient, one in the brood box and one near the Arduino at the top of the hive), an SD card shield to log the data, and a 6 AA battery pack for power. I built a ventilation type board to house the electronics. I put plastic mesh on the bottom and on the vent holes that the bees hopefully won't chew through. I'm still unsure of where to dangle the sensor for the brood box. I guess between two drawn frames in the middle of the box would be the best. Hopefully they won't build a bunch of bridge comb around it. Otherwise I guess I'd put it between the first or last frame and the hive body. I'd love to be able to set up solar power but that would be a future project. I have some "sleep" code in between polls of the sensors, so hopefully the batteries will last more than a few weeks.

    Here are some photos

    ArduinoVentBoard.jpg
    ArduinoTestDeploy.jpg

  15. #35
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    Jan 2014
    Location
    Manassas, Virginia, USA
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    914

    Default Re: Arduino Bee Projects?

    I got sidetracked for a while. The Seeeduino Mega is still in a box, never could get it to load code, probably due to a USB driver issue. The Grove strain amplifier turned out to be a waste of time. They changed the design, and apparently populated it with the wrong gain resistors so it has almost no sensitivity.

    My buddy MSimon got a little carried away with the hive scale project, and instead of just building a shield or stain amplifier, he threw in a processor. Alas, he's a Forth enthusiast, and hates C, so this will be a different learning experience for most Arduino users. It shouldn't be hard to learn, but I need to get handle on it. The board is fabricated and has two A-D channels, 24-bit if my memory serves correctly. He provided me with a USB board to communicate with it. I've yet to plug it in, but did get out the schematic and found out I need a 3.3V supply for it. Parts for that shipped today.

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